Department of English

DEPARTMENT OF

English Language and Literature

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English Undergraduate Course Offerings

 

Each year Queen’s English offers a variety of courses and approaches from which you can choose, whether you are building your degree program or looking for an intriguing elective. Descriptions of the courses offered in the 2016-17 academic year are available at the links below. These descriptions provide an idea of the readings and assignments for which students will be responsible.

 

SNEAK PREVIEW! Select 200-Level Courses for 2016-17

 

ENGL 217 001/3.0 Postcolonial Literatures: Introduction to Postcolonial Literature: Contemporary African Literature

Poster for ENGL 217 - Postcolonial Literatures

 

Term: winter

Instructor: Sarah Kastner

Description: This course will provide students with a general introduction to the central ideas, debates, and themes that preoccupy contemporary ‘African Literature’. Exploring various genres and critical approaches, we will trace major Anglophone literary movements on the continent from the mid-twentieth century to present, in order to develop an understanding of what unifies African writing. We will then ask critical questions about contemporary African writing, its shifting themes, its new locations, and its relationship to globalization. Authors covered may include: Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugi wa Thiong'O, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Buchi Emecheta, Nuruddin Farah, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Nadine Gordimer, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nnedi Okorafor, Taiye Selasi,and Binyavanga Wainaina.

"Show a people as one thing, over and over again, and that is what they become."

- Chimamanda Ngezi Adichie

Requirements: Assessment will include one or more essays, participation in lively discussion, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 234 001/3.0 The Short Story in English: Creating Character in the Short Story

Poster for ENGL 234 - The Short Story: Creating Character in the Short Story

 

Term: fall

Instructor: Dan Krahn

Description: Prose fiction excels at creating and exploring character and identity; the ideas of the self—who we are, how we create and maintain who we are, and how we relate to other people—have been some of prose fiction’s central concerns. Short stories, with their razor-sharp focus and emphasis on impactful storytelling, offer unique challenges and opportunities for representing character and identity. This course explores the ways character is created and represented in the works of four masters of the short story: James Joyce, Vladimir Nabokov, Flannery O’Connor, and Alice Munro. Short stories can play by the rules; they can also break them. In both cases, the characters they create are memorable, complicated, and startlingly human—brief, bright images of who we are.

"She has passed into Art. It doesn't happen to everybody."

- Munro

Requirements: Assessment may include one or more essays, several quizzes, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 237 001/3.0 Children’s Literature

Poster for ENGL 237 - Children's Literature

 

Term:  fall

Instructor: Patricia Oprea

Description: This course explores the history of children’s literature and focuses particularly on works that contain humanized animals. Children’s literature often appeals to a dual audience: children and adults can derive satisfaction and instruction, though potentially for different reasons. Students who have read works on the syllabus as children may find the experience of returning to these books as adults both surprising and rewarding. Students will explore a variety of works that contain material suitable for children (such as lessons about the importance of friendship and hard work, imaginative adventures, and heroic characters), yet also contain material that may be more comprehensible to adults (such as totalitarian politics, abuse of animals, and the struggle for survival). Students can expect a variety of genres: picture books, fairy tales, novels, TV shows, and movies. Works may include the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen, The Berenstain Bears, Watership Down, Black Beauty, Alice in Wonderland, White Fang, Charlotte’s Web, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh, Animal Farm, My Little Pony, and The Lion King.

Requirements: Evaluation will consist of several scheduled in-class responses, two writing assignments (one of which will be an essay), and a final exam.

 

ENGL 238 001/3.0 Comics and Graphic Novels

Poster: Queen's University, The Department of English Language and Literature Presents ENGL 238. Joker: How'd you get so smart and broody? Batman: I took Nicky's comics class, duh. Leave me alone.

 

Term: winter

Instructor:  Nicole Pacas

Description: In 1938, when Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel created a strong man who secretly liked wearing tight clothes, they forever changed the landscape of comics. In 1954, when Dr. Fredric Wertham claimed that comics seduced child readers into becoming juvenile delinquents, he influenced the way comics were bought, sold, and displayed. In the late 1970s, when Will Eisner called his comic a “graphic novel,” he challenged the way we think about comics as literary texts and as works of art.

This course examines the development of comics throughout the twentieth-century by focusing on the theoretical, formal, and narrative elements of comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels. We will attempt to define what comics are, whether they are literature, how verbal and visual languages work together, and why comics are not just for kids (were they ever really just for kids?). Texts for this course may include works by Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Lynda Barry, and selections from The Walking Dead, Archie, Wonder Woman, and X-Men.

With comics by: Shuster and Siegel, W.M. Marston, S. Lee and J. Kirby, D Messick, N. Gaiman, Kirkman and Moore, A. Bechdel and many more!

"...words and pictures, married, might possibly produce a progeny more interesting than either parent"

- Theodor Seuss Geisel

Requirements: Assessment for this course will include in-class quizzes, two essays, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 244 001/3.0 Modern British Fiction

Poster for ENGL 244 - Modern British Fiction

 

Term: winter

Instructor:  Emily Murphy

Description: What do we mean when we say “modern,” “modernity,” or “modernism”? How do space, nationality, or identity shape the modern experience? This course engages with these questions through the fiction of the modernist period. Three major themes structure the course: Literary London, Literary Paris, and Global Modernity. Through these geographical themes, we will explore the dynamics of celebrity, authorship, personality, and artistry that emerged in the period. Texts may include Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Gertrude Stein’s Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, in addition to more contemporary reflections on the period like Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris.

"On or about December, 1910, human character changed."

- Virginia Woolf

Requirements: May include one literary close-reading assignment, short response papers, a major project proposal and a major project.

 

ENGL 257 001/3.0 Elizabethan Shakespeare

Poster for ENGL 257 - Elizabethan Shakespeare

 

Term: winter

Instructor:  Allison Goff

Description: The works of William Shakespeare have been an integral part of education in the humanities. We study Shakespeare’s plays thematically, dramatically, and linguistically to help develop our critical thinking and analytical skills. This course will explore how Shakespeare’s own education, with its emphasis on classical learning and rhetoric, influenced the methods and modes of writing in his early plays. We will consider how the different plays employ rhetorical exuberance to instruct, craft arguments, inspire nationalism, defend honour, seek revenge, and woo a lover. We will also consider how examples of rhetoric in these plays shift in relation to gender, morality, social class, and political authority. The plays chosen for this course will cover the three major theatrical genres in which Shakespeare wrote: tragedy, comedy, and history. Selected texts may include Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, Taming of the Shrew, Love’s Labour’s Lost, and Henry V.

"Sir, he hath never fed of the dainties that are bred in a book. He hath not eat paper, as it were, he hath not drunk in. His intellect is not replenished. He is only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts."

- Shakespeare

Requirements: This course will be evaluated through short quizzes, one close reading assignment, one essay, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 258 001/3.0 Jacobean Shakespeare

Poster for ENGL 258 - Jacobean Shakespeare

 

Term: fall

Instructor: Jaspreet Tambar

Description: This course will study the second half of Shakespeare’s career, with a focus on the tragedies. Students will learn how modern tragedy, beginning with Shakespeare, redefined such notions as “fate” and “the individual” that were central to the great tragedies of classical antiquity. Primary readings will include Julius Caesar, King Lear, Othello, Coriolanus, and Macbeth. We will also examine theories of tragedy, as by Aristotle and Hegel, and consider Shakespeare’s Romantic critics, like Coleridge and Hazlitt, who secured the bard’s reputation as an unmatched genius in English arts and letters.

"Blood will have blood."

- Macbeth

Requirements: Assessment will include quizzes, one or more essays, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 271 001-5/3.0 Issues and Themes: Special Topics I - Literature and Digital Culture - Cyber-Lit: 21st Century Fiction and Digital Culture

Poser for ENGL271-5: Cyber-Lit

 

Term: fall

Instructor: Aislinn McDougall

Description: From the proliferation of television and film in the 1950s and 1960s, to the impact of the personal computer, the internet, the smart phone, and social media, we have come to live in a media-saturated society that seems to have little time for the page-turners of the past. Or does it? From Orwell and Bradbury to Pynchon and DeLillo, many 20th century fiction authors grappled with the inundation of new media technology. But what about now? In conversation with current cultural critics, this course sets out to interrogate the status of literature in the popular culture-praising, social media-ridden 21st century. We will examine the influence of digital media on fiction in terms of content, form and style, and explore contemporary longings to escape the linearity of the traditional novel, to mimic the infinity and haphazardness of the internet, to include a participatory and sometimes multitudinous readership and to experiment with visual media in literature itself. We will open up discussions about the social and political implications of media saturation such as isolation, narcissism, terrorism, body image, identity and transparency both within and outside of the fiction to be studied. A provisional reading list includes: Mark Z. Danielewski’s The Familiar Vol. 1 (2014); Dave Eggers’ The Circle (2013); Jennifer Egan’s Look at Me (2001); Thomas Pynchon’s Bleeding Edge (2013); Alina Simone’s Note to Self: A Novel (2013); as well as Skip Brittenham and Brian Haberlin’s 3D graphic novel, Shifter (2013) and discussions of popular digital literatures and games such as The Sims, Second Life, Bioshock, and Mass Effect.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based on 2 essays, some creative assignments and a final exam.

 

ENGL 271 001-6/3.0 Issues and Themes: Special Topics I - Literature and Violence – Violence and Catastrophe in 20th Century Literature and Film

Poster for ENGL271-6 Literature and Violence

 

Term:  winter

Instructor: Adam Cotton

Description: This course explores and scrutinizes the relationships and tensions between violence, catastrophe and 20th Century literature and film. It examines the formal and thematic entanglements of these two mediums. Art may conceal or even initiate and propagate violence and catastrophe; yet, art can expose horrendous crimes and aid the oppressed in their struggle against injustice and subsequent trauma. Such contradictions will leave students asking: do the arts de-humanize as much as they humanize? Why is violence and catastrophe in the 20th Century so inextricably linked to Literature and film? The texts and films selected for this course are drawn from a wide range of historical, cultural and social contexts and conditions.

Students will probe articles, autobiographies, diaries, films, manifestos, novels and poems—written and directed by feminists, war veterans, sufferers of mental illness, victims of racism, survivors of the Holocaust and the Soviet labour camps, Fascist dictators, and artists who confront, personally, the horrors of violence and catastrophe.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based upon two written assignments, participation, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 278 001/3.0 Literature and Place: The World in Ruins

Poster for ENGL 278 - Literature and Place: the World in Ruins

 

Term: fall

Instructor: Jon deTombe

Description: While the news daily heralds imminent disasters of war, climate change and outbreaks of disease, this course will examine literary representations of the post-apocalyptic world. Students will investigate the ways in which a person’s interactions with nature, society and language change following a cataclysmic event. The course will begin with several Romantic authors, reading texts as reflections of contemporary anxieties about population growth, war, the environment, science and religion. Other readings may include texts by H. G. Wells, Samuel Beckett, Walter M. Miller, Margaret Atwood, Cormac McCarthy and Emily St. John Mandel.

Requirements: Assessment will include quizzes, one or more essays and an examination.

 

 

Course Descriptions

100-Level Courses 2016-17

 

ENGL 100/6.0 Introduction to Literary Study

Term: full year

Instructors: Molly Wallace (100 001, full year & 100 002, fall,) Scott-Morgan Straker (100 002, winter,) Chris Fanning (100 003, full year)

Description: An introduction to literary study, with an emphasis on the formal analysis of a diverse range of poetry and prose. Specific content and approach vary from section to section, but all sections share the goals of developing sensitivity to genre, cultivating writing skills, and providing students with a set of literary terms and critical techniques as a foundation for further literary study.

Note: ENGL 100 is a prerequisite for all subsequent ENGL courses. This course is offered in two sections, each involving two lectures and one tutorial per week. Students must enrol in the same section and the same tutorial for the entire year. Enrolment preference is given to first-year students.  Also offered as an online course; first-year on-campus Arts students are excluded from the online section.

 

ENGL 160/6.0 Modern Prose Fiction

Term: full year

Instructors: Robert May

Description: This course is designed to promote interest in and appreciation for modern and contemporary prose fiction by introducing students to a selection of the most influential short stories and novels of the twentieth century. The course will provide students with a vocabulary for reading and discussing twentieth-century works of prose, and it will explore some of the most important themes, ideas, and preoccupations in modern and contemporary prose fiction. American, British, Canadian, and world authors will be represented.

Requirements: Evaluation methods will include written assignments, class attendance and participation, periodic quizzes, and a final exam.

Note: This course is intended for the non-major and does not contribute to an ENGL degree. Enrolment is limited to students not registered in an ENGL Plan, and preference is given to upper-year students. This course may not be used as a foundation for an ENGL Plan or a prerequisite for upper-year ENGL courses.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from ENGL 100/6.0, ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 112/6.0, ENGL 160/6.0.

200-Level Courses 2016-17

 

The prerequisite for ENGL 200–299 is a minimum grade of C in ENGL 100/6.0. Note that courses at the 200 level have limited enrolments. Students registered in an English plan applying to take these courses have priority over those applying to take them as electives.

Registration in a Major or Medial English plan is a prerequisite of the ENGL 290 seminar course (30 students max). The format of all other 200-level courses is lecture and discussion. These non-required 200-level courses are subdivided into broad Surveys (English 201–229) and courses in genre (230–249), authors in context (250–269), issues and themes (270–289), and theory and criticism (291–299). Grading is shared between instructors and teaching assistants.

 

 

ENGL 200 001/6.0 History of Literature in English

Term: full year

Instructor: Scott-Morgan Straker

Description: This course surveys the major periods, important developments, and most influential authors of literature in English from the Middle Ages to the present. It tells the story of how English literary culture began as the property of a small population in a remote corner of Europe and grew into the global phenomenon it presently is. Thus, the first half of the course will focus exclusively on British literature, and primarily on poetry, because that is what there was; the second half will feature increasing amounts of prose, and a broadening geographical scope.

Texts that are remote from us in time can be difficult to approach unless readers have a sense of the forms, styles, and preoccupations that obtained in different periods. This course aims to provide a set of orientation points that help readers to approach, say, an Augustan, a Romantic, a Modernist, or a Postcolonial text with with an informed sense of what to look for.

That said, this course is about more than just great books and famous writers. Literature always creates a relationship between writers and readers, and we will focus on both parties of that relationship by asking the following questions:

  1. Who is reading? Sex, social class, and race influence a reader’s access to literature in different periods.
  2. How do they read? The shift from manuscript culture to print culture, and then to global mass market, affect not only the number of people reading but also the type of text that becomes popular.
  3. Why do they read? The hardest question to answer, this one forces us to consider the different purposes literature can serve (instructional, entertaining, politically subversive, etc.), as well as the most basic question of what qualifies as literature in the first place.

Requirements: Essays, quizzes, participation (in class and online), and a two-hour exam at the end of each term.

 

ENGL 200 002/6.0 History of Literature in English

Term: full year

Instructor: Elizabeth Hanson

Description: This course traces the historical development of literature in English from its beginning to the present. We will begin with the writing down of Anglo Saxon oral poetry at the end of the first millennium and conclude with a consideration of English as a world literary language at the beginning of the third millennium. On the way we will discuss important events and movements in literary culture such as the Renaissance, Romanticism, Modernism, and the development of post-colonial literature in English. We will consider historical issues such as the impact of printing and new methods of publication on literary forms and the ways that participation in literary culture is determined and contested. We will also attend to the history of literary forms, considering the emergence of new genres, borrowings between genres, experiments with narrative, the development of English meters, and the changing registers of literary language.

The course will be organized around the study of canonical authors, e.g. Geoffrey Chaucer, Christopher Marlowe, John Milton, William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Wallace Stevens and Derek Walcott. Students will learn historical and intellectual contexts for their works, practice appropriate strategies of close reading and develop a precise and sophisticated critical vocabulary.

 

ENGL 215 001/6.0 Canadian Literature

Term: full year

Instructor: Heather Macfarlane

Description: Canada is home to a long and rich variety of literary traditions, making it impossible to speak of one Canadian literature. In order to determine what Canadian Literatures are, and how they influence our perception of Canada, we will examine both the similarities and differences between various communities’ literatures, as well as the contexts in which they were written. Starting with examples of traditional Indigenous literatures, we will look at novels, short stories, plays, poetry, songs and films from many communities, regions and historical periods with the goal of demonstrating the impact of literature on our understanding of diverse and shared experiences.

Requirements: 2 essays, 1 test, participation, 2 exams.

 

ENGL 217 001/3.0 Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures: Contemporary African Literature

Term: winter

Instructor: Sarah Kastner

Description: This course will provide students with a general introduction to the central ideas, debates, and themes that preoccupy contemporary ‘African Literature’. Exploring various genres and critical approaches, we will trace major Anglophone literary movements on the continent from the mid-twentieth century to present, in order to develop an understanding of what unifies African writing. We will then ask critical questions about contemporary African writing, its shifting themes, its new locations, and its relationship to globalization. Authors covered may include: Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugi wa Thiong'O, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Buchi Emecheta, Nuruddin Farah, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Nadine Gordimer, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nnedi Okorafor, Taiye Selasi,and Binyavanga Wainaina.

Requirements: Assessment will include one or more essays, participation in lively discussion, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 234 001/3.0 The Short Story in English: Creating Character in the Short Story

Term: fall

Instructor: Daniel Krahn

Description: Prose fiction excels at creating and exploring character and identity; the ideas of the self—who we are, how we create and maintain who we are, and how we relate to other people—have been some of prose fiction’s central concerns. Short stories, with their razor-sharp focus and emphasis on impactful storytelling, offer unique challenges and opportunities for representing character and identity. This course explores the ways character is created and represented in the works of four masters of the short story: James Joyce, Vladimir Nabokov, Flannery O’Connor, and Alice Munro. Short stories can play by the rules; they can also break them. In both cases, the characters they create are memorable, complicated, and startlingly human—brief, bright images of who we are.

Requirements: Assessment may include one or more essays, several quizzes, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 237 001/3.0 Children’s Literature

Term:  fall

Instructor: Patricia Oprea

Description: This course explores the history of children’s literature and focuses particularly on works that contain humanized animals. Children’s literature often appeals to a dual audience: children and adults can derive satisfaction and instruction, though potentially for different reasons. Students who have read works on the syllabus as children may find the experience of returning to these books as adults both surprising and rewarding. Students will explore a variety of works that contain material suitable for children (such as lessons about the importance of friendship and hard work, imaginative adventures, and heroic characters), yet also contain material that may be more comprehensible to adults (such as totalitarian politics, abuse of animals, and the struggle for survival). Students can expect a variety of genres: picture books, fairy tales, novels, TV shows, and movies. Works may include the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen, The Berenstain Bears, Watership Down, Black Beauty, Alice in Wonderland, White Fang, Charlotte’s Web, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh, Animal Farm, My Little Pony, and The Lion King.

Requirements: Evaluation will consist of several scheduled in-class responses, two writing assignments (one of which will be an essay), and a final exam.

 

ENGL 238 001/3.0 Comics and Graphic Novels

Term: winter

Instructor:  Nicole Pacas

Description: In 1938, when Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel created a strong man who secretly liked wearing tight clothes, they forever changed the landscape of comics. In 1954, when Dr. Fredric Wertham claimed that comics seduced child readers into becoming juvenile delinquents, he influenced the way comics were bought, sold, and displayed. In the late 1970s, when Will Eisner called his comic a “graphic novel,” he challenged the way we think about comics as literary texts and as works of art.

This course examines the development of comics throughout the twentieth-century by focusing on the theoretical, formal, and narrative elements of comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels. We will attempt to define what comics are, whether they are literature, how verbal and visual languages work together, and why comics are not just for kids (were they ever really just for kids?). Texts for this course may include works by Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Lynda Barry, and selections from The Walking Dead, Archie, Wonder Woman, and X-Men.

Requirements: Assessment for this course will include in-class quizzes, two essays, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 244 001/3.0 Modern British Fiction

Term: winter

Instructor:  Emily Murphy

Description: What do we mean when we say “modern,” “modernity,” or “modernism”? How do space, nationality, or identity shape the modern experience? This course engages with these questions through the fiction of the modernist period. Three major themes structure the course: Literary London, Literary Paris, and Global Modernity. Through these geographical themes, we will explore the dynamics of celebrity, authorship, personality, and artistry that emerged in the period. Texts may include Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Gertrude Stein’s Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, in addition to more contemporary reflections on the period like Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris.

Requirements: May include one literary close-reading assignment, short response papers, a major project proposal and a major project.

 

ENGL 257 001/3.0 Elizabethan Shakespeare

Term: winter

Instructor:  Allison Goff

Description: The works of William Shakespeare have been an integral part of education in the humanities. We study Shakespeare’s plays thematically, dramatically, and linguistically to help develop our critical thinking and analytical skills. This course will explore how Shakespeare’s own education, with its emphasis on classical learning and rhetoric, influenced the methods and modes of writing in his early plays. We will consider how the different plays employ rhetorical exuberance to instruct, craft arguments, inspire nationalism, defend honour, seek revenge, and woo a lover. We will also consider how examples of rhetoric in these plays shift in relation to gender, morality, social class, and political authority. The plays chosen for this course will cover the three major theatrical genres in which Shakespeare wrote: tragedy, comedy, and history. Selected texts may include Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, Taming of the Shrew, Love’s Labour’s Lost, and Henry V.

Requirements: This course will be evaluated through short quizzes, one close reading assignment, one essay, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 258 001/3.0 Jacobean Shakespeare

Term: fall

Instructor: Jaspreet Tambar

Description: This course will study the second half of Shakespeare’s career, with a focus on the tragedies. Students will learn how modern tragedy, beginning with Shakespeare, redefined such notions as “fate” and “the individual” that were central to the great tragedies of classical antiquity. Primary readings will include Julius Caesar, King Lear, Othello, Coriolanus, and Macbeth. We will also examine theories of tragedy, as by Aristotle and Hegel, and consider Shakespeare’s Romantic critics, like Coleridge and Hazlitt, who secured the bard’s reputation as an unmatched genius in English arts and letters.

Requirements: Assessment will include quizzes, one or more essays, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 271 001-5/3.0 Issues and Themes: Special Topics I – Cyber-Lit: 21st Century Fiction and Digital Culture

Term: fall

Instructor: Aislinn McDougall

Description: From the proliferation of television and film in the 1950s and 1960s, to the impact of the personal computer, the internet, the smart phone, and social media, we have come to live in a media-saturated society that seems to have little time for the page-turners of the past. Or does it? From Orwell and Bradbury to Pynchon and DeLillo, many 20th century fiction authors grappled with the inundation of new media technology. But what about now? In conversation with current cultural critics, this course sets out to interrogate the status of literature in the popular culture-praising, social media-ridden 21st century. We will examine the influence of digital media on fiction in terms of content, form and style, and explore contemporary longings to escape the linearity of the traditional novel, to mimic the infinity and haphazardness of the internet, to include a participatory and sometimes multitudinous readership and to experiment with visual media in literature itself. We will open up discussions about the social and political implications of media saturation such as isolation, narcissism, terrorism, body image, identity and transparency both within and outside of the fiction to be studied. A provisional reading list includes: Mark Z. Danielewski’s The Familiar Vol. 1 (2014); Dave Eggers’ The Circle (2013); Jennifer Egan’s Look at Me (2001); Tao Lin’s Taipei (2012); Thomas Pynchon’s Bleeding Edge (2013); Alina Simone’s Note to Self: A Novel (2013); as well as Skip Brittenham and Brian Haberlin’s 3D graphic novel, Shifter (2013) and discussions of popular digital literatures and games such as The Sims, Second Life, Bioshock, and Mass Effect.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based on 2 essays, some creative assignments and a final exam.

 

ENGL 271 001-6/3.0 Issues and Themes: Special Topics I – Literature and Violence in 20th Century Literature and Film

Term: winter

Instructor: Adam Cotton

Description: This course explores and scrutinizes the relationships and tensions between violence, catastrophe and 20th Century literature and film. It examines the formal and thematic entanglements of these two mediums. Art may conceal or even initiate and propagate violence and catastrophe; yet, art can expose horrendous crimes and aid the oppressed in their struggle against injustice and subsequent trauma. Such contradictions will leave students asking: do the arts de-humanize as much as they humanize? Why is violence and catastrophe in the 20th Century so inextricably linked to Literature and film? The texts and films selected for this course are drawn from a wide range of historical, cultural and social contexts and conditions.

Students will probe articles, autobiographies, diaries, films, manifestos, novels and poems—written and directed by feminists, war veterans, sufferers of mental illness, victims of racism, survivors of the Holocaust and the Soviet labour camps, Fascist dictators, and artists who confront, personally, the horrors of violence and catastrophe.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based upon two written assignments, participation, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 278 001/3.0 Literature and Place: The World in Ruins

Term: fall

Instructor: Jon deTombe

Description: While the news daily heralds imminent disasters of war, climate change and outbreaks of disease, this course will examine literary representations of the post-apocalyptic world. Students will investigate the ways in which a person’s interactions with nature, society and language change following a cataclysmic event. The course will begin with several Romantic authors, reading texts as reflections of contemporary anxieties about population growth, war, the environment, science and religion. Other readings may include texts by H. G. Wells, Samuel Beckett, Walter M. Miller, Margaret Atwood, Cormac McCarthy and Emily St. John Mandel.

Requirements: Assessment will include quizzes, one or more essays and an examination.

 

ENGL 290 001/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation – Medieval Drama: Selections from the York and Towneley Cycles

Term: fall

Instructor: Ruth Wehlau

Description: Medieval cycle plays are a lively and accessible, telling stories from the Bible, yet often filled with comic horseplay. This course will involve the careful close reading of a selection of plays from two major late medieval northern cycles, the York Cycle and the Towneley Cycle, including the Towneley Second Shepherds’ Play, the York Crucifixion, and the Towneley Last Judgement. All plays will be read in Middle English, but students will receive help in acquiring the skills needed to read and pronounce the language. Some portion of class time will be devoted to “workshopping” the plays, i.e. reading the plays aloud in order to investigate how they might have been performed in their own day.

Requirements: Students will be expected to write an essay and an exam, and to do a class presentation and report. Students will also be assessed on their class participation and will be expected to read or perform a portion of a play in conjunction with other students.

 

ENGL 290 001/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation – Charles Dickens's Bleak House

Term: winter

Instructor: Heather Evans

Description: The course will focus on Bleak House, one of Charles Dickens's longest and darkest novels. Reading the novel in stages throughout the term will allow us to appreciate the implications of the serialized publication history of the work and provide opportunity to consider the role of the periodical press in nineteenth-century culture.

Requirements: Regular attendance, active participation, a seminar presentation, an essay, and a final exam. Additional short written assignments may also be required.

 

ENGL 290 002/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation – Ulysses

Term: fall

Instructor: Heather Evans

Description: “There are two kinds of people,” declared a recent contributor to The Economist, “Those that have read Ulysses, and those that haven’t.” Since its scandalous publication in 1922, James Joyce’s epic novel, structured around Homer’s Odyssey, has been variously the subject of groundbreaking censorship trials, lauded as one of the greatest masterpieces of English literature, condemned as an impossibly difficult novel to read, mocked as a ludicrously overwrought story of a day in the life of its rather ordinary protagonist Leopold Bloom, illustrated by artistic luminaries such as Henri Matisse, made sexy by Eve Arnold’s 1955 photographs of Marilyn Monroe reading the book in a playground, and the inspiration for countless pilgrimages to Dublin and pub crawls through the city. Named by British actor Stephen Fry as his favourite book, Ulysses, Fry says, is not only a great work of comedy, but it is “the most affirmative book”; “you’ll be astonished by how beautiful it is, and it’s a book like no other that you can return to again and again and again and again.” As the writer in The Economist asserted, the novel’s “patient readers are marked for life by having read it.” Without necessarily promising a life- altering experience, our journey through Joyce’s often dark and dingy Dublin and irrepressibly sympathetic exploration of human nature – pimples, warts and all -- will begin with an introduction to Joyce’s Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and will provide opportunity to develop close reading and critical interpretation skills.

Requirements: One essay, a final exam, regular attendance and active class participation, and a seminar presentation; may include short written assignments.

 

ENGL 290 002/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation – Reading Byron's Don Juan

Term: winter

Instructor: Mark Jones

Description: Lord Byron’s Don Juan (published serially and anonymously in 1819-1824, and left unfinished at Byron’s death) both riveted and scandalized contemporary readers. It was panned by reviewers for immorality but sold more copies than any contemporary literary work. Byron called it an “epic satire”; others have classed it (though it is in ottava rima) as picaresque or historical novel. It parodies the Bible, satirizes religion, cross-dresses, denounces war, and idealizes piracy and young love. W.H. Auden called it “the most original poem in English,” Virginia Woolf “the most readable poem of its length ever written.” It is, at any rate, in all its variety, a great vehicle for an introductory course in critical reading and writing. The syllabus of ENGL 290-002 includes the whole of Don Juan with supplementary critical materials. The seminar seeks to develop skills in the analysis and interpretation of literature, and especially of poetry.

Requirements: Eighty-percent attendance is required to pass. Other requirements include regular preparation and participation, occasional reading quizzes, one individual or group seminar facilitation, two or three essays (2,500 words total), and a two-hour final exam.

 

ENGL 290 003/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation – Reading Michael Ondaatje

Term: fall

Instructor: Heather Macfarlane

Description: The study of literature is a multidisciplinary undertaking, and offers insight into such numerous domains as aesthetics, language, sociology, gender, geography, politics and psychology, to name but a few. This seminar will allow participants to engage intimately with two or three Ondaatje texts in order to develop close-reading skills and hone their ability to think critically. Through discussion, research and writing we will consider a broad range of critical approaches to the texts themselves and to literature in general, and examine the impact of literature on our understanding of the world around us.

Requirements: Test, 10-minute presentation, annotated bibliography/article review; participation; final exam.

 

ENGL 290 003/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation – "(What Did I Do to Be So) Black and Blue": Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

Term:  winter

Instructor: Asha Varadharajan

Descriptions: In Unspeakable Things Unspoken: The Afro-American Presence in American Literature, Toni Morrison reflects, tellingly, on the "miscegenation" of the literary canon rather than simply its "range" or "flexibility" or, indeed, its "diversity." This provocation frames our interpretation of Morrison's first novel, The Bluest Eye. Our discussions will ponder some of the following questions: if, as Morrison suggests, African-Americans have been condemned to "silence" and "unbeing," why does her novel shape that silence and inhabit that unbeing rather than break the former and transcend the latter? Why is Morrison's focus a language worthy of the wealth and complexity of African-American culture rather than what she describes as a "lazy" realistic or sociologically revealing mode of representation? Morrison asks: what makes a work "black?" Could The Bluest Eye provide the beginnings of an answer? The Bluest Eye invites intimacy by denying readers "safe harbors;" our aim, in deploying tried and true methods (deconstructive, narratological, psychoanalytic, feminist) of literary interpretation, will be to learn to respect the enigma that is Morrison's finest novel. If none of these forms of inquiry interest you, come and find out how The Bluest Eye nuances, perhaps even challenges, Lupita Nyong'o's speeches and Lady Gaga's 2016 performance at the Oscars! The course will be designed to interpret The Bluest Eye in light of socio-economic contexts and multi-media intertexts.

Requirements: Grades will be based on voluntary and assigned participation, 1-3 short writing assignments to assess the progressive acquisition of sophisticated interpretive skills, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 292 001/6.0 Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory

Term:  full year

Instructor: Maggie Berg

Description: This is an introduction to literary criticism and theory. It asks what we are doing when we read literature and why we are doing it. We will examine what people have proposed about the nature of the literary work of art and its role in our lives. Fall term will consider various ways in which people make sense of a literary text by relating it to its: author, social context, language and style, or reader. Winter term will focus on recent theories that are relevant to how we read literature, including Marxist, structuralist, poststructuralist, feminist, psychoanalytic, and queer. Each term we will employ literary texts as case studies, so that we can see the implications of the various theories for how we read a work of literature. The theories are demanding, but they raise important issues not only about how we read, but also about who we are and the way we live our lives.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based on two term papers, two one-page papers, a mini-project and an exam at the end of the year.

300-Level Courses 2016-17

 

To take 300-level English courses, one must:

  • be enrolled in an ENGL BAH program (Medial or Major),
  • have successfully completed ENGL 200/6.0 and ENGL 290/3.0, and
  • have obtained a minimum GPA of 2.4 in all previous ENGL units.

Minors with a minimum grade of B+ in at least 18.0 previous ENGL units may take 6.0 units at the 300 level, if space permits. Note that courses at the 300-level have limited enrolments. Students registered in an English Plan applying to take these courses as Core courses have priority over those applying to take them as Option courses.

 

ENGL 306 001/6.0 The Northern World: Vikings and Saxons – Irish, Icelandic and Anglo-Saxon Literature

Term: full year

Instructor: Ruth Wehlau

Description: This course will introduce students to the literature of peoples from three major islands of north-west Europe — Ireland, Britain, and Iceland — who all interacted with each other during the Middle Ages. Works to be read include the Irish epic The Táin, and the poem Sweeney Astray; Norse myth and legend, and Icelandic sagas; and a variety of Old English poems, including Beowulf. All works will be read in translation. Classes will involve a combination of lecture and discussion.

Requirements: Students will be assessed on the basis of class participation, a class presentation, essays, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 311 001/6.0 Middle English Literature

Term: full year

Instructor: Margaret Pappano

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the diversity of medieval literature in the British Isles from around the year 1000-1500. Beginning with Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman texts, this course will trace the rise of English in relation to other languages of the British Isles, considering how it gains authority as a written language, particularly in dialogue with Latin. The focus of the course will be on Middle English texts from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries when the language becomes more familiar to modern readers. We will spend some time learning Middle English and honing translation and pronunciation skills. The course situates medieval texts from a wide variety of genres in their cultural and historical contexts, attentive to the diverse audiences that contributed to establishing English as a national literary language. The course will examine important aspects of medieval culture as they intersect with our literary texts, such as oral poetics; knighthood and the court; religious practices; heresies; artisans, merchants and civic life; ideas of death and apocalypse; specific forms of premodern gender identities. As an exciting feature of medieval literarture, the course will examine the manuscript contexts for texts as we study them. Some texts and authors include: Beowulf, Marie de France, Christine of Markyate, Chaucer, Malory, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, anonymous romances, morality and cycle plays.

Requirements: regular attendance, translation quizzes, short assignments, three essays, final exam

 

ENGL 321 001/6.0 Renaissance Poetry and Prose

Term: full year

Instructor: Gwynn Dujardin

Description: This survey course tracks the development of poetry and prose in England in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Focusing on the definition of English as a literary language, the composition of English verse and prose forms, and the cultural status of the poet or prose author, the course asks the following questions: How do authors define and endorse English writing, in relation to classical, continental, and medieval literatures? How do authors circulate their work, and conceive their reading audiences? How are political and religious conflicts represented, and how do authors make their own views known through their work? How are (what we consider) private concerns, such love and marriage, gender and sexuality, publicly defined and represented through English Renaissance texts? By considering these and other related questions, the course prepares students for further study in English Renaissance literature as well as other literatures in English.

Requirements: Class meetings will include both lecture and discussion, and course requirements include attendance and participation, 2-3 writing assignments; a creative project; and a final exam.

 

ENGL 340 001/6.0 Romantic Literature

Term: full year

Instructor: Mark Jones

Description: ENGL 340 is a survey course in English Romantic literature, including the poetry and poetics of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Keats, and fiction by Austen and Mary Shelley. The chief learning objectives are to enhance students’ interest and expertise in the featured works and authors and to develop disciplinary skills in reading, discussion, research, and writing. The chief learning component is not the regular lecture but the course of reading, as supplemented with online study materials, lecture, discussion, quizzes, and writing.

Requirements: Include regular reading and attendance, ten or more reading quizzes, three writing assignments, and a three-hour final exam.

 

ENGL 347 001/6.0 American Literature and the Long 19th Century

Term: full year

Instructor: Laura Murray

Description: The United States of 1780 — a small mercantile colony on the edge of a continent — and the United States of 1910 — a preeminent industrial global power — have little in common. And yet there are fascinating continuities across this broad swath of history, and even with today’s USA. For example, white Americans showed both a devotion to the principle of rights and a persistent practice of getting around that principle; a commitment to geographical expansion and a fear of people and lands on or beyond the “frontier”; a desire to emulate Europe and a desire to reject it. In this course, literature will provide a window into how Americans near and far from power imagined their past, their present, and their future, and how they tried to persuade others to share their views. Authors will include Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Theodore Dreiser. Readings will extend beyond novels and poetry to oratory, memoir, manifesto, and journalism.

Requirements: Requirements include quizzes or small preparation assignments most weeks; a fall essay on an assigned topic; a research essay in the winter on a student-generated topic proposed in advance; and a final exam.

 

ENGL 356 001/6.0 British Fiction of the 19th Century

Term: full year

Instructor: Sally Brooke Cameron

Description: The nineteenth century witnessed the rise of the novel as one of the dominant literary forms. The novel was a particularly popular mode for thinking through new and sometimes even radical ideas about the modern individual and his/her relationship to social environments or political agency. This course will chart the evolution of the novel form through a representative sampling of texts. Class lectures and reading assignments will position primary texts within their relevant historical contexts so that we can come to understand the role this new literary form played in the development of nineteenth-century ideas about class, gender, nationhood, and citizenship. We will, for example, look at the range in gendered and classed characters associated with an ever-growing range in novel genres, including domestic fiction, the bildungsroman, the social problem novel, and sensation fiction. Possible authors include (but are not limited to): Jane Austen, Maria Edgeworth, Walter Scott, the Brontë sisters, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Wilkie Collins, Marie Corelli, George Gissing, and Thomas Hardy.

Requirements: Two researched term papers, short response papers, regular participation and in-class quizzes, a midterm & final exam.

 

ENGL 360 001/6.0 Modernist Literature: Poetry and Fiction

Term: full year

Instructor: Jessica Moore

Description: From Ezra Pound’s imagism to the work of the Lost Generation—so named by Gertrude Stein—to the mass marketing of genre fiction, the idea of how to write literature and to categorize its literary modes underwent a drastic change in the 1890s-1940s. Modernist writers questioned the existing forms of social and cultural order, favouring the individual experience over abstract ideologies and traditional configurations of social roles. This course explores the works of American and British writers in their active pursuit of a redefinition of literature, as well as of social and cultural norms, throughout the modern period. Writers will likely include Henry James, T.S. Eliot, Evelyn Waugh, and Edith Wharton, amongst other literary modernist writers, but we will also foray into the work of pulp writers of genre fiction working in the same contemporary context. We will focus on the great turn to art and imagery as a locus of meaning, the shift from the traditional to the innovative, and individual psychology and agency in the midst of an age of doubt, disillusionment, cynicism, and crisis.

Requirements: 2 short essays; 1 longer essay; in-class quizzes, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 389 001/6.0 Context North America – The Environment in Contemporary North American and Indigenous Literature

Term: full year

Instructor: Petra Fachinger

Description: This course will explore how nature and the relationship between humans and the non-human world are constructed in contemporary American, Canadian, and Indigenous literature in this age of climate change, environmental crises, population growth, and loss of biodiversity. We will begin by considering the non-fiction texts of some of the precursors of ecological writing (Henry David Thoreau, Catharine Parr Traill, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson) and the Creation and Re-Creation stories in the Anishinaabe tradition, as retold by Basil Johnston. The course is organized in six interconnected sections: climate change; reading and writing water; ecosystem of war; endangered species; biodiversity and organic farming; waste and pollution. We will consider a variety of modes and genres, including the graphic novel, Indigenous ways of storytelling, life writing, drama, and poetry to explore questions of ecological poetics and the relationship between aesthetics, responsibility, and environmental activism. We might include texts by Julia Alvarez, Louise Erdrich, Ann Eriksson, Linda Hogan, Helen Humphreys, Thomas King, Barbara Kingsolver, Jim Lynch, Josh Neufeld, Ruth Ozeki, Annabel Soutar, and Rita Wong.

Requirements: Attendance and participation, 2 in-class midterm exams (fall/winter), an “eco diary” (fall), and final paper (winter).

400-Level Courses 2016-17

 

To take 400-level English courses, one must:

  • be enrolled in an ENGL BAH program (Medial or Major),
  • have successfully completed ENGL 200/6.0 and ENGL 290/3.0, and
  • have obtained a minimum GPA of 2.4 in all previous ENGL units.

Minors with a minimum grade of B+ in at least 18.0 previous ENGL units may take 6.0 units at the 300 level, if space permits. Note that courses at the 400-level have limited enrolments. Students registered in an English Plan applying to take these courses as Core courses have priority over those applying to take them as Option courses.

You may take these courses more than once provided that the topics are different, and all versions that you take will count toward your program and toward your GPA. The same is not true of non-repeatable courses: only one version of non-repeatable courses may count toward your program and GPA. If you have any questions about which courses are repeatable, or about how repeatable courses work, contact the Undergraduate Chair.

 

ENGL 411/825 001-2/3.0 Topics in Medieval Literature II – Anglo Saxon Language and Literature

Term: winter

Instructor: Ruth Wehlau

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the language and literature of the Anglo-Saxons. Students will be introduced to the grammar and vocabulary of Old English, and will read a variety of Old English poem, including elegies such as The Wife’s Lament and The Wanderer, heroic poetry, riddles, maxims and charms, and selections from Beowulf in the context of current critical approaches. Works will be read partly in translation, partly in the original Old English, but with ample glossing and/or side by side translation. Classes will consist of close class reading and discussion.

Requirements: Students will be assessed on class participation, a class presentation, an essay and an exam.

 

ENGL 421 001-1/3.0 Topics in Renaissance I – Classical, Popular Drama: Queer Shakespeare: Difference, Sex, and Sexuality

Term: winter

Instructor: Cathleen McKague

Description: The queer is that which defies definition and containment: it is the deviant, the transcendent, the unfixed and the unfixing. This course examines representations of the queer in the works of Shakespeare and some of his fellow playwrights. We will investigate concepts such as the difference between homoeroticism and homosociality; the presence of lesbian desire in early modern drama; boy theatre; crossdressing; androgyny; sexlessness; and that which is ambiguous and undefined. Specifically, we will view these works through an English Renaissance lens to discover what gender, sex, and sexuality meant during this era, as well as ways in which playwrights challenged, perpetuated, or even altered existing norms. Possible readings include Shakespeare’s As You Like It, Coriolanus, Macbeth, and Twelfth Night; Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II; John Lyly’s Galatea; Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher’s Love’s Cure; and Ben Jonson’s Volpone and Epicene. We will supplement our study of these plays with discussions of the Haec Vir and Hic Mulier pamphlets, King James’ letters to his male favourites, and real-life “roaring girl” Moll Firth, among other contextual, historical documents and phenomena.

Requirements: As this seminar is discussion-based, participation and attendance will be a part of the final grade. The course work will involve one short paper; a class presentation; a longer essay; and a two-hour final exam.

 

ENGL 421 001-3/3.0 Topics in Renaissance I – Magic in the English Renaissance

Term: fall

Instructor: Gwynn Dujardin

Description: Raised on Harry Potter and supernatural romance novels and shows such as “Merlin,” “Heroes,” and “Fringe,” students today are well acquainted with fictional depictions of the supernatural. This class will reflect on the contemporary appeal of the occult while examining representations of magic in late sixteenth and early seventeenth-century England. Topics we’ll consider include the relationship of magic to early modern philosophies of language and theories of knowledge, ways that belief in the occult both squares with Christian theology and contributes to the emergence of science, the social and economic forces driving belief in witchcraft and alchemy, and the use of magic as an allegory for literature and/or theatre. Prospective readings include treatises on magic and witchcraft, popular accounts of alleged witchcraft and sorcery, and texts such as Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, Thomas Dekker’s The Witch of Edmonton (co- authored with John Ford and William Rowley), Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist, and William Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

Requirements: Class meetings will be discussion-based and student-led, and smaller primary source projects will lead to a final term essay and 2-hour exam.

 

ENGL 441 001-4/3.0 Topics in Romanticism I – Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Term: fall

Instructor: Mark Jones

Description: ENGL 441 is an introductory seminar in the poetry and poetics of one of the founding figures of English Romanticism. The syllabus includes Coleridge’s most famous lyric and narrative poems (from the “Conversation Poems,” the “Rime,” and “Christabel” to “Work without Hope”), some less famous political odes and sonnets, and excerpts of influential prose writings in philosophy, politics, and criticism. The chief learning objectives are to enhance students’ interest and expertise in the featured works and develop disciplinary skills in reading, discussion, research, and writing.

Requirements: Eighty-percent attendance is required to pass. Other requirements include regular preparation and participation, occasional reading quizzes, one individual or group seminar facilitation, one or more essays (2,500 words total), and two-hour final exam.

 

ENGL 442 001-1/3.0 Topics in Romanticism II – Romanticism and the Visual

Term: fall

Instructor: Emma Rosalind Peacocke

Description: William Hone’s 1821 pamphlet, “The Political Showman,” concludes with an engraved image of repressive politicians cowering beneath the narrator’s gaze, and with the reassuring message that these ferocious creatures “cannot take a step beyond the reach of MY EYE” – the pupil of which is a printing press. Just as Hone makes vision inextricable from the written and printed word, this course will focus on Romantic literature and print culture’s imbrication in the visual – both in the visual arts and in ways of seeing and appreciating. Course texts will include illuminated books by William Blake, descriptive poetry by John Keats, William Wordsworth, and Felicia Hemans, passages from novels by Jane Austen, and visionary poems by Anna Laetitia Barbauld and Lord Byron. We will encounter less frequently taught authors like John Thelwall and John Clare, writers on the picturesque such as Uvedale Price, and illustrated books like the very funny Dr. Syntax’s Tour in Search of the Picturesque. Critics like John Barrell and Gillen D’Arcy Wood have established the political and social nature of Romantic vision, while recent works by Elizabeth Fay, Christopher Rovee, Sophie Thomas and Gavin Budge all use the idea of vision to establish the philosophical and ethical underpinnings of Romanticism. Note: “Romanticism and the Visual” will feature tours and seminars in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and the W.D. Jordan Library Special Collections.

Requirements: Reading Journal, Agnes Etherington Art Centre Short Assignment, W.D. Jordan Library Special Collections Short Assignment, Multi-stage Essay Assignment, In-Class Presentation and brief Written Report on In-Class Presentation.

 

ENGL 446 001-2/3.0 Topics in the Literature of the Americas I – Poe and Hawthorne

Term: fall

Instructor: Tracy Ware

Description: This course will focus on the short fiction of Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne’s stories have long been influential, both for their distinctive qualities and for their sense of regional and national identity. Although he was a sceptical outsider to New England, Poe recognized Hawthorne’s importance in reviews that have become landmarks in the theory of the short story. By contrast, Poe never fit readily into a national canon: he was suspicious of nationalism; he has been enthusiastically received outside of the U.S.; and his most original work lies in such new or unusual genres as detective fiction, science / speculative fiction, puzzles and hoaxes, stories of terror, and the “prose poem.” In these and other forms, Poe remains inescapable for those interested in popular fiction and film. We will read the selections of their work available in the Norton Critical Editions, though we will also read Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter.

Requirements: The course work will involve one seminar presentation, a mid-term examination, a term paper, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 446 001-1/3.0 Topics in the Literature of the Americas I  – Literary NYC in the Gilded Age: Between Extravagance and Corruption

Term: winter

Instructor: Jessica Moore

Description: New York City has always been a locus of dynamic change and shifting cultural scenes, but with great change, diverse growth, and rapid urbanization in the 1870s to the turn of the century came underlying corruption, violence, and social division. The Gilded Age is so called for its opulence, elegance, and glamour—an age of beautiful things—but it was a surface that could be easily chipped away. During this period, New York became known for its extravagant wealth and opulent aesthetics—expensive costume balls, social gatherings, and a surge in the interior decorating industry—but also for its vice and violence, from politicians on the take, to the rich getting richer on the backs of the poor, to gangsters trying to get a territorial foothold. This course aims at identifying and engaging with the divergence between New York’s dual natures in the Gilded Age of America: outward extravagance and an underbelly of corruption, wealth and poverty, politics and culture, upper and lower classes, industry and a fascination with the occult. Works to be read in this course will likely include fiction and poetry written or set in New York during this turbulent period, and we will focus on the question: what did it mean for a quickly developing city to be so united and yet so divided in its values and prospects for the future?

Requirements: Close-reading assignments; 1 short seminar presentation; final essay; and final exam.

 

ENGL 451 001-1/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature I – At Table with the Victorians: Nineteenth-Century Gastronomy and Food in Victorian Literature

Term: fall

Instructor: Heather Evans

Description: This course will offer an introduction to the history and literature of nineteenth-century gastronomy, the art of fine dining. Treating the long nineteenth century as a grand literary banquet, we will whet our appetites on gastronomic treatises by writers such as Alexandre Balthazar Laurent Grimod de la Reynière, William Kitchiner, Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, and Thomas Walker, and nibble our way through tasty essays, fiction and poems penned by both epicurean and abstemious writers, such as Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Lewis Carroll, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Sarah Grand. Along the way, we will snack on Victorian cookbooks and stir up issues such as vegetarianism, famine, the emergence of the restaurant, women cooks, tippling, temperance, and the importance of tea.

Requirements: One seminar presentation, one term paper, active participation, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 452 001-1/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature II  – Late Victorian Popular Fiction

Term: winter

Instructor: Chris Bongie

Description: Genre fiction as we understand it today (horror, romance, fantasy, science fiction, spy novels, etc.) first took shape in the closing decades of the nineteenth century, when the achievement of nearly universal literacy in Britain paved the way for a new mass readership and the consolidation of perceived boundaries between “high” and “low” culture. This seminar course provides an introduction to late Victorian popular fiction, examining the work of several bestselling authors such as George du Maurier (Trilby) and Marie Corelli (Ziska), as well as surveying a range of genres that gained prominence in the 1890s, such as detective fiction (notably, Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Sign of Four), horror fiction (Richard Marsh’s The Beetle), and science fiction (H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds). Readings will also include a selection of literary and cultural criticism from the period that will provide students with a sense of the material conditions in which authors of the late Victorian period worked.

Requirements: Two minor (3 page) research assignments; two discussion-leading assignments; one (8-10 page) essay; one in-class exam; class participation & excellent attendance.

 

ENGL 452 002-2/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature II  – Animals and Animality

Term: winter

Instructor: Maggie Berg

Description: Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species (1849) had an enormous influence on Victorian culture and literature, creating anxieties about the species divide and about humans’ closeness to animals. This course will examine Victorian literary and visual depictions of animals and of human animality. We will consider the role and significance of animals in a variety of genres, and will explore Victorians’ fears of their own animal natures.

Literary texts may include The Animals Reader; Alfred Lord Tennyson, “In Memoriam,” Anna Sewell, Black Beauty; Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey; Wilkie Collins, Heart and Science; Virginia Woolf, Flush, Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton. We will also examine visual art by Edwin Landseer, Charles Burton Barber, and others.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based on a seminar presentation, a presentation of a visual image, a term paper, participation and an exam.

 

ENGL 456 001-1/3.0 Group II: Special Topics I – Thomas De Quincey: On Drugs, Death, and Detectives

Term: winter

Instructor: Robert Morrison

Description: This course examines Thomas De Quincey and his portraits of addiction in works such as Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) and On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts (1827; 1839; 1854). It then examines the ways in which De Quincey’s various self-representations are exploited, undermined, and appropriated in a series of texts, including Charles Baudelaire’s The Flowers of Evil (1857), Arthur Conan Doyle’s Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892), Peter Ackroyd’s Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem (1994), and David Morrell’s Murder as a Fine Art (2013).

 

ENGL 461 001-1/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary British Literature I – War Literature Between the Wars: Elegies and Memoirs of the First World War and the Spanish Civil War

Term: winter

Instructor: Patricia Rae

Description: This seminar will concentrate on an important strain in the literature and culture in Britain between the First and Second World Wars (1919-1939). Its focus will be on examples of the elegy and the memoir, two important genres in an era marked by a “boom in sorrow” (W.H. Auden.)

In the first half of the course, we’ll think about the discourses of consolation deployed during the First World War and in its aftermath, starting with some poetic elegies. We’ll then turn to some poetic anti-elegies whose aim is to disrupt or prevent consolation. We’ll then turn to two famous war memoirs by Siegfried Sassoon and Vera Brittain, once again asking how these texts process, and model a response to, loss. In the course of our discussions we’ll study certain key concepts for the study of elegy, mourning, memory (both personal and collective), public monuments, and commemorative ceremonies.

In the second half of the term, we’ll begin asking questions about what happened to the consolatory (and anti-consolatory) discourses of World War I as the 1930s progressed and Fascism became a mounting threat in Europe. In this context, we’ll focus mainly on some poems and memoirs from the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), a conflict widely regarded as a dress-rehearsal for the world-wide confrontation with Fascism in World War II. This conflict was a very different one from World War I – for British volunteers who supported the Spanish Government, a cause not recognized by their own government back at home. Looking at a parallel set of texts to those we’ve looked at from World War I, including two more war memoirs by male and female writers (George Orwell and Nan Green), we’ll ask what difference it makes to these texts that the cause was an “unofficial” one. Our study of this war’s writings will culminate in a wider reflection on war and “collective memory”: on the institutions that reinforce the memory of certain wars and not others.

Requirements: one group seminar, one research paper, final exam.

 

ENGL 464 001/6.0 Literary Modernism

Term: full year

Instructor: Patricia Rae

Description: During the first half of the twentieth century many modernist writers experimented radically with language in an effort to confront their inheritance from the nineteenth-century and “make it new” (Ezra Pound). In the process, they collaborated with visual artists, crafting manifestoes about the creative process. This interdisciplinary seminar course will explore some of those experiments, with a view to understanding the creative processes behind them, how they work, and what they encourage their readers to understand about the modern world. We will look at literary and visual texts as examples of particular movements within modernism (Impressionism, Symbolism, Futurism, Expressionism, Imagism, Vorticism, Cubism, Surrealism, the New Realism), comparing their strategies and thinking about them with reference to their movements’ manifestos. Throughout the course, we’ll ask questions about the historical and social circumstances fueling these movements and also about the potential of their experiments to shape where history and society are headed. In what ways were these experiments the response to technological changes and to imperialism? What influence did the Great War have on literary and artistic experimentation? How did experimental artists respond to the challenge posed by the Great Depression and the rise of totalitarianism in the 1930s? What was the legacy of the first modernist experiments for “late modernism” during and after World War II?

Writers considered will include Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, Stéphane Mallarmé (in translation), Arthur Symons, Ezra Pound, T.E. Hulme, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, H.D, Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein, Winifred Holtby and George Orwell.

Requirements: two essays (one short, one long), two collaborative group presentations, final exam.

Note: For the final assignment, there will be an option for students interested in creative writing and visual art to craft their own manifestoes and creative works, modeling some of the principles we’ve studied.

 

ENGL 466 001-4/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I – Transnational Contemporary Fiction: Transnational Perspectives in Contemporary Canadian Writing

Term: winter

Instructor: Petra Fachinger

Description: This seminar explores the representation of transnational contexts in contemporary Canadian writing. Transnationalism has become fundamental to debates about literature as scholars wrestle with the interrelated phenomena of economic and cultural globalization, migration, diaspora, and global travel. What are the connections among literature, nationalism, and cultural identity in the context of ever-expanding transnational relations? What is the relationship between diaspora and transnationalism? How is the intersection between the local, the national, and the transnational imagined in Canadian fiction? The increasingly transnational character of Canadian writing also raises questions about the creative, institutional, and political conditions that shape it and about identity formation, trauma, multidirectional memory, and citizenship. The seminar is organized in three interconnected sections: transnational shifts in Asian Canadian fiction; narratives of war, terrorism, and peacekeeping; writing the global city. We might include texts by Anita Rau Badami, Gurjinder Basran, Steven Heighton, Carrianne K.Y. Leung, Kyo Maclear, Shani Mootoo,Tessa McWatt, Madeleine Thien, Ayelet Tsabari, Fred Wah, and Rita Wong.

Requirements: Attendance and participation, midterm exam, quizzes, final paper.

 

ENGL 466 002-3/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I – Canadian Short Story Collections

Term: winter

Instructor: Tracy Ware

Description: In Canada, short fiction remains vital though sometimes overshadowed by the novel, though Alice Munro’s Nobel Prize reveals that the shadow can be lifted. This course will investigate the ways in which five authors arrange their stories into books: at one end of the spectrum, a sequence of stories may have the same protagonist, as in Margaret Atwood’s Moral Disorder; at the other end, a miscellaneous collection may be most notable for the diversity of its stories. Somewhere in between come the works of Alistair MacLeod and Munro, with their recurring themes and strong sense of place. In addition to Moral Disorder, we will read MacLeod’s The Lost Salt Gift of Blood, Munro’s Runaway, Thomas King’s Medicine River, and one other book.

Requirements: The course work will involve one term paper, one seminar presentation, a mid-term examination, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 467 001-2/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I – Language, Culture & Politics: Words in Place: Settler and Indigenous Stories of Kingston/Cataraqui

* A Principal's Dream Course *

Term: winter

Instructor: Laura Murray

Description: In this course, students will read and write in a deeply personal and local way, examining their own relation to the colonial history of Kingston and by extension Canada. The course will engage with the Indigenous history of Kingston via archival materials and community conversations, and by analogy to other places in Canada where Indigenous and settler discourses of “heritage” may be at odds. We will also reflect on our own personal relationships to the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe territory on which Queen’s sits, provoked and inspired by literary examples. In collaboration with graduate students in an Indigenous Public Art course, we will experiment with modes of inscribing or reinscribing the land, and practice unsettling writing about specific places, their inhabitants, and their histories. Thus this course is partly theory, partly creative writing, partly Canadian literature, and partly Indigenous literature. Students with backgrounds and interests in any of those areas are most warmly invited to join it. While as an advanced course in the Department of English the course has prerequisites, requests to waive those will be entertained in cases where a student can demonstrate other appropriate experience or knowledge.

Requirements: The course is based on active participation. Assignments will include journalling and writing in various genres, and a final group project in public space with an accompanying individual analytical or reflective component.

 

ENGL 471 001-1/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary American Literature I – African American Literature and Culture

Term: fall

Instructor: Kris Singh

Description: In a recent memoir, Austin Clarke, who was born in Barbados and lives in Canada, explains that at the start of his literary career his “nearest models” were African American writers like James Baldwin and Richard Wright. Clarke reminds us that literary influence is not contained by national borders. He is echoed by Paule Marshall, who was born in the United States to Barbadian parents: “I don’t make any distinction between African-American and West Indian. All o’we is one as far as I’m concerned. And I, myself, am both.” In this course, we will investigate the transnational literary crosscurrents evident in this expanded idea of African American literature by juxtaposing writers like Baldwin, Wright, Clarke, and Marshall. More than simply considering the Caribbean presence in African American literature or the African American influence on Caribbean and black Canadian literature, this course aims to simultaneously read within and without borders. In reflecting on the constitution of individual and collective identities, we will pay attention to the promise of the American dream, the (dis)integrative capacity of religious traditions, and racialized understandings of space.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based on regular reflection assignments, an oral presentation, a term paper, and a final examination.

 

ENGL 476 001-2/3.0 Topics in Postcolonial Literatures I – Contemporary Caribbean Literature

Term: winter

Instructor: Chris Bongie

Description: This course will introduce students to some of the broader concerns of postcolonial studies by focusing on the particular case of anglophone Caribbean literature. The primary focus will be on contemporary Caribbean novels, although the course will begin with a unit centered on Derek Walcott’s 1958 play Drums and Colours that will establish an historical backdrop for the more recent works to be studied in this course. Our consideration of Walcott will be followed by a unit featuring Erna Brodber’s Myal (Jamaica, 1988) and Edwige Danticat’s The Farming of Bones (Haiti/US, 1998), which will examine the construction of (racial/national/gender) identity in two novels set in the early twentieth century. The next unit will be focused on Marlon James’s epic novel about slavery and its abolition, The Book of Night Women (Jamaica, 2009); this section will also include a discussion of historical documents associated with the Haitian Revolution (1791-1803) in order to get us thinking about the ways in which postcolonial literature responds to and reworks colonial discourse. In the final unit of the course, we will be reading two novels with a contemporary setting, David Chariandy’s Soucouyant (Canada/Trinidad, 2007) and Oonya Kempadoo’s All Decent Animals (UK/Guyana/Trinidad, 2013), that engage with the theme of diaspora and issues associated with that theme (such as intergenerational memory and cultural hybridity).

This seminar course is open to non-ENGL students with third- or fourth-year-level standing and an interest in postcolonial and/or Caribbean studies. Please contact the Department for permission.

Requirements: Five brief (2 page) response papers; one discussion-leading assignment; one in-class exam; minor homework assignments; class participation & excellent attendance.

 

ENGL 482 001-2/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures II – Introduction to Indigenous Literatures: Seeking a Critical Centre

Term: winter

Instructor: Heather Macfarlane

Description: Ojibway poet and scholar Kimberley Blaeser’s groundbreaking 1993 essay, “Native Literature: Seeking a Critical Centre,” cautions that applying western critical frameworks to Indigenous texts can be an act of colonization when meaning is imposed on the text by the dominant culture and the works are taken out of their specific cultural contexts. In order to remedy this, Blaeser suggests that meaning should come from within the text rather than outside it. Accordingly, this course examines Indigenous literary works through the lens of foundational works of Indigenous literary criticism in order to determine the themes, aesthetics and politics characteristic of the literatures in question. We will examine textual and theoretical approaches to land, language, spirituality, storytelling, colonization, literary nationalism, reconciliation, racism, gender, sexuality and residential schools, and considers the role that Indigenous literatures play in shaping perceptions of Indigenous identity both within and outside the cultures in question. Texts may include Introduction to Indigenous Literary Criticism in Canada, and works by authors such as Eden Robinson, Lela Kiana Oman, Tracey Lindberg, Tomson Highway, Louise Halfe, and Daniel David Moses.

Requirements: Seminar presentation, essay, participation, exam.

 

ENGL 482 001-3/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures II – Contemporary North American Indigenous Literatures

Term: fall

Instructor: Petra Fachinger

Description: This seminar examines contemporary Aboriginal and Native American literatures. We will study the themes, aesthetics, and politics of novels, short stories, poetry, and plays written in English. While close attention will be given to territorial, tribal, national, and cultural diversity, as well as the heterogeneity of the texts, pan-Indigenous approaches will be considered where appropriate. We will discuss textual and theoretical approaches to topics such as representations of trauma and racism, decolonization and resistance, gender and sexuality, the environment, Indigenous-non-Indigenous relations, and crossing borders. We might include texts by Sherman Alexie, Beth Brant, Darrell Dennis, Cherie Dimaline, Louise Erdrich, Eric Gansworth, Joy Harjo, Linda Hogan, Lenore Keeshig, Thomas King, Kevin Loring, Lee Maracle, Scott Momaday, Eden Robinson, Drew Hayden Taylor, and Richard Wagamese.

Requirements: Attendance and participation, midterm exam, quizzes, final paper.

 

ENGL 486 001-3/3.0 Group III Special Topics I – The Graphic Novel: Visualizing History and Bearing Witness to Trauma

Term: winter

Instructor: Heather Evans

Description: “It is rare for a new genre to appear in any art form,” remarks Stephen E. Tabachnick in an essay on pedagogy, yet “[with] the emergence of the graphic or comic book novel, precisely that phenomenon has been happening before the excited gaze of [readers] of both literature and the visual arts.” This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore and to apply to this relatively new literary form the close reading and critical analytical skills they have become accustomed to applying to more familiar genres. Framed loosely by a consideration of the history of the genre, we will interrogate the relationships between the graphic novel and other forms of sequential art. Given that the development of the graphic novel by writers such as Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Joe Sacco, Marjane Satrapi, and Alan Moore has coincided with growing representation in literature of troubling social phenomena, our course will especially focus on ways that the genre gives voice to personal trauma such as mental illness, sexual abuse, and loss, and bears witness to such cultural trauma as racism, revolution, war, and genocide.

Requirements: One seminar presentation, one term paper, active participation and a final exam.

 

ENGL 487 001-1/3.0 Group III: Special Topics II – Contemporary Muslim Literature: Muslim Identity in the Diaspora

Term: fall

Instructor: Margaret Pappano

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the growing body of writing by and about Muslims as a diverse but distinctive diasporic group, particularly in North America and Europe. Our objective is to gain a more complex understanding of Muslim identities by examining how Muslims represent themselves as well as the contexts in which they write. The course will focus on experiences of colonization, occupation, war, immigration, citizenship, racialization and racism, and the consequences of 9/11 in shaping Muslim lives. In particular, this course explores the complex and conflicting attitudes and practices around gender and sexuality that inform Muslim identities as well as how Muslims are perceived by non-Muslims. The course thus addresses contemporary debates about hijab and niqab in Canada and elsewhere. In addition to literary texts such as novels, memoir, poetry, plays, and film, this course explores theoretical and historiographical writing on Muslim identities. Some authors include: Susan Abulhawa, Lela Aboulela, Monica Ali, Nafisa Haji, Mohja Kahf, Yussef El-Guindi, Amina Wadud.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion, oral presentation, midterm essay, final essay, final exam.

 

ENGL 487 002-2/3.0 Group III: Special Topics II – Science Fictional Worlds

Term: fall

Instructor: Jessica Moore

Description: Ray Bradbury writes, “As soon as you have an idea that changes some part of the world, you are writing science fiction. It is always the art of the possible, never the impossible.” Iain Banks similarly adds, “Science fiction is trying to find alternative ways of looking at realities.” As these writers exemplify, science fiction is the process of visualizing and magnifying our conception of what reality and “worlds” are—how they exist and function, their limits and constructions, their potential evolution and destruction. Whether physical in scope or ideological, the notion of a “world” in this exciting genre is always transformative and under transformation as alternate realities, futuristic dimensions, and interstellar space serve as more than a backdrop to the complex social constructs and themes the genre examines and challenges. From the sub-genres of time travel, cyberpunk, post-apocalyptic, and space opera, this course offers the opportunity to not only engage critically with science fiction as a literary genre, but also to study how the technological imagination in narrative has changed over time, and, through microscopic as well as telescopic lenses of literary inquiry, to question our world as we choose or choose not to perceive it.

Requirements: Close-reading assignments (with creative options); 1 short seminar presentation; final essay; and final exam.

 

ENGL 489 001-1/3.0 Group III: Special Topics IV – Literary Screen Plays

Term: winter

Instructor: Armand Garnet Ruffo

Description: The dramatic screenwriting seminar and workshop offers students an opportunity to learn the craft of writing for film. The aim of the course is to provide students with a solid foundation for writing their own screenplays. The class will therefore be structured as both an academic seminar and a writing workshop. Students will present selected scenes from films, closely examining fundamental storytelling elements while working on their own writing project. The goal will be to adapt an existing short story into a screenplay that adheres structurally and dramatically to acceptable screenwriting practice. To facilitate this process there will be weekly reading and writing assignments. For example, you will be asked to provide a complete breakdown of your characters, to write a logline, a synopsis, and an outline. As this course is designed to be part workshop participation and attendance are essential, and only motivated students committed to the workshop process should consider enrolling. It is also highly recommended that students taking the class have some experience in creative writing or in film studies.

 

ENGL 491 001-1/3.0 Topics in Literary Interpretation I – Autobiography and Life Writing: Witnessing Life Stories

Term: fall

Instructor: Dale Tracy

Description: This course explores contemporary autobiographical poetry and prose that performs the act of witnessing. To witness can mean either to see or to tell, either to experience first-hand or to pay attention to what’s happening to someone else. We will study different aspects of witnessing through two thematic halves of the course. In “Digging for Clues,” we will consider the mystery involved in bearing witness to one’s own experiences. The writers we will study trace prompts and intuitions to find their life stories. Through texts exploring actions like making, growing (up), digging, dyeing, and dying, we will approach witnessing as cyclical, involving the past, present and future. We will ask, what does witnessing reveal and what remains unknowable? “Writing What It Is” will move further into the memoirist’s mind as we question what forms of authority one relies on to recall and express what one has witnessed. Bearing witness may concern the personal and social, natural and cultural, inherited and creative. These texts seek combinations of these possibilities to respond to personal suffering, social injustice, and, more generally, the role of the past in the present.

Requirements: Evaluation will be based on participation, one presentation, one essay, and a final exam.

Online Courses Summer 2016

 

ENGL 100 700/6.0 Introduction to Literary Study (CDS)

Term: summer

Instructor: Robert May

Description: This English course introduces you to the four main literary genres: fiction, poetry, drama, and the essay. It is also designed to improve your writing skills, and to develop your knowledge of literary terms and critical techniques as a foundation for further literary study. Why study literary genre? “We need poems and stories and novels and plays, as well as essays,” replies the great American writer Scott Russell Sanders. “Each genre offers us paths through the dark woods of this life, and we need all the paths we can find.”

Requirements: Essay 1, 10%; Essay 2, 10%; Essay 3, 15%; Essay 4, 15%; Close Reading Forums, 15%; 1 Live Online Symposium, 5%; Final Proctored Exam, 30%

 

ENGL 200 700/6.0 History of Literature in English (CDS)

Term: summer

Instructor: Leslie Ritchie

Description: An historical survey of literature from the British Isles and beyond. Through the study of representative works, the course aims to familiarize students with the characteristics of literary periods from the Middle Ages to the present.

Requirements: Essay #1, 15%; Individual Close Reading Assignment, 10%; Small Group Research Assignment, 10%; Essay #2, 25%; Interactive Group Participation (5 x 2%), 10%; Final Proctored Exam, 30%

 

ENGL 281 700/3.0 Legends of King Arthur: Medieval to Modern (CDS)

Term: summer

Instructor: Ruth Wehlau

Description: This course introduces students to the literary tradition surrounding King Arthur, from the early medieval period to the twentieth century, focusing on the tradition within Great Britain. The course will follow the Arthurian myth, its stories and its characters, as they evolve through time in different contexts, and through different genres, from early romances to twentieth-century musical drama. Special attention will be paid to notions of kingship, nation, and gender as represented within Arthurian literature.

Requirements: Online discussions, 15%; Short written responses to discussion questions (2 x 10%), 20%; Essay (1800-2000 words), 30%; Exam (two-hour, proctored), 35%