Queen's Film and Media

Queen's Film and Media

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Film and Media Course Offerings: 2018-19

(Timetable is Subject to Change without Notice)

NOTE:  STSC 300*, STSC 339*, DEVS 305, IDIS 311*, and IDIS 410* may be used as Optional Film units and also see NEW FILM Centric Options. These FILM Centric Options include INTS 326/3.0; LLCU 206/3.0; LLCU 207/3.0; LLCU 214/3.0; LLCU 226; LLCU 249/3.0; LLCU 308/3.0; LLCU 309/3.0; LLCU 326/3.0; LLCU 328/3.0; LLCU 358/3.0; RELS 237/3.0; SPAN 458/3.0. 

See Programs for required Courses.

(This Film Centric Options list contains courses offered through other Departments. In accordance with Academic Regulation 2.5, students do not have enrollment priority in all of these courses. Access to these courses may only be made available during the Open Enrollment period, and then only if space permits.)

Learning Hours Legend:

L Lectures G Group Learning
T Tutorials I Individual Instruction
S Seminars O Online Activities
Lb Labs Oc Off-campus Activity
Pc Practicum P Private Stu

 


Course Offerings 2018-19:

FILM 104/3.0                                     Film Form and Modern Culture to 1970

Introduction to tools and methods of visual and aural analysis and to historical and social methods, with examples primarily from the history of cinema and other moving-image media to 1970. NOTE Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.


FILM 106/3.0                                      Film Form and Modern Culture from 1970

Introduction to tools and methods of visual and aural analysis and to historical and social methods, with examples primarily from cinema and other moving-image media dating from 1970 to the present. NOTE Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24G;12O;48Oc) EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from BISC 100/3.0; FILM 106/3.0.


 FILM 110/6.0 Fall/Winter                  Film, Culture and Communication

Introduction to analysis of film, television, new media and other related forms of contemporary culture. Includes classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema, Canadian film and television, alternatives in international cinema, as well as recent developments on the internet, in gaming, and in social media.

LEARNING HOURS 216 (24L;24Lb;36T;36Pc;96P)

Instructors: G. Kibbins/S. Lord/S. MacKenzie/D. Naaman


FILM 206/3.0 Fall                              Research, Writing, and Presentation Methods

Topic for 2018: “How I Learned to Survive Film Studies and Love 1980’s Cult Cinema”

Designed to teach academic ‘survival skills’ to second-year students (and beyond), this course cultivates effective reading, writing and presentation practices. Moving from introductory workshops on professionalism, time management and procrastination, to more detailed tutorials on writing foundations, thesis construction, and visual analysis, this course prepares students with the necessary knowledge to navigate Film Studies. Sourcing visual texts from 1980’s Cult Cinema, films will include Ladyhawke (1985), Teen Wolf (1985), Clue (1985), and Adventures in Babysitting (1987). Assigned readings for this course will range in complexity and focus. Students should prepare for an organic classroom experience that is paced to accommodate learning needs while still meeting the instructor’s expectations. Students should be ready to craft written assignments, complete in-class exercises, participate in discussion, and present work in a structured and supportive environment.

NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/3.0 and FILM 104/3.0).

Instructor: D. Vena


FILM 210/3.0 Winter                           The Horror Film

This course will offer an introduction to horror cinema and horror film scholarship by way of historical and contemporary texts, with emphasis placed on cultural analysis and criticism. This class argues that far from being exclusively concerned with simple scare tactics, horror exorcises larger social anxieties over gender, race, sexuality, class, and place. Challenging traditional film canons that either locate horror as the purview of male auteurs or as low budget, indie spectacles, this course challenges students to reassess their assumptions about horror and to view it as one of the most dynamic and intelligent genres available to viewers. Students should be prepared to watch a range of domestic and international films, including Dracula (1931), Eyes Without A Face (1960), Persona (1966), and Candyman (1992). Assigned readings will all speak to the evolving body of horror film scholarship, with complimentary assignments meant to further student’s theoretical and analytical understandings of the genre. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Level 2 or above.

Instructor: D. Vena


FILM 214/3.0 Winter                           Mobile Communications

This course involves both media studies and production. Students will use their own mobile devices to complete a series of creative projects, while learning theoretical and practical aspects of mobile media communications.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;36O;36P)

Instructor: S.Hart


FILM 215/3.0 Fall                             Science Fiction Cinema

This course examines the emergence and continuing popularity of the science fiction film from a global perspective. It explores the history and transformations of the genre and the ways in which science fiction film has been mobilized in popular media to address larger cultural, political, and sociological issues. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Level 2 or above.

Instructor: P. Gauthier


FILM 216/3.0 Fall                           Historical Inquiry

This course explores what historical research can tell us about how movies are made, how they are watched, and what they mean. In the Fall of 2018, FILM 216 will focus on silent films made between World War I and the Great Depression. This was the period in which cinema evolved from a fascinating novelty into one of the world’s major arts, into an industry closely linked with national identity, and into a global entertainment medium. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/3.0 and FILM 104/3.0).

Instructor: P. Baxter


FILM 226/3.0 Fall                            Critical Inquiry

Textual analysis of narrative and other films, including examination of formal, aesthetic, and narrative techniques and conventions, and their production of meaning in social and political contexts. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/3.0 and FILM 104/3.0).

Instructor: K. Bertrand


FILM 236/3.0 Winter                        Media and Cultural Studies

Introduction to cultural and social theory of film and other media as it relates to the tension between citizenship and consumerism. Examines roles, functions, and impact of mass media technologies, institutions, and practices in both scholarly and practical forms. NOTE Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;24O;36P)

Instructor: I. Robinson


FILM 240/3.0 Fall                           Media and Popular Culture

This course on the dynamics between media and popular culture takes an interrogative approach. It is organized around a series of questions that will introduce students to a range of key concepts in media and mass communication studies, with the goal of providing a theoretical structure to support critical analysis of contemporary cultural trends. NOTE Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;36PS;36O)

Instructor: P. Gauthier


FILM 250/6.0 Fall/Winter           Fundamentals of Media Production

A foundation in media production techniques relevant to graphic, sound, and moving-image formats. Topics include project design, technical workflow, and the aesthetic and social aspects of screen-based media. Students undertake several group projects in the first term and a major video production in the second term. NOTE Production supplies $250. Priority will be given to students with the highest overall GPA on FILM courses, including those at the 100-level. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0.

LEARNING HOURS 216 (48L;24Lb;60G;24O;60P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization.

Instructors: E. Pelstring / A. Guerrero Cortés


FILM 260/3.0 Spring                     Digital Media Theory and Practice

Survey of digital media theories and online mass communication practices, with emphasis on social and mobile technologies. Course considers the impact of digitalization on the creative and culture industries. NOTE Only offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (72O;48P)

Instructor:  P. Gauthier


FILM 300/3.0  Spring                           Hollywood: The Dream Factory

This course examines Classical Hollywood Cinema from the early 1940s until its demise at the end of the 1950s. NOTE Only offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0).

Instructor: S. MacKenzie


FILM 303/3.0 Fall                                 World Cinemas

This course offers an overview of recent filmmaking and media practices from various continents. We will explore how intimate, personal styles of filmmaking converge with theories of globalization, hybridity, transnationalism, and remediation, through the study of a selection of films greatly influenced by the political, cultural, economic, social, and historical forces at work in a number of countries around the world. NOTE Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0) or (LLCU 209/3.0; DEVS 240/3.0) or permission of the Department.

Instructor: K. Bertrand


FILM 305/3.0 Winter                            European Narrative

In 2018-2019, we will be exploring various versions of historical and political imaginaries in European cinemas, concentrating on the works of Sergio Leone and Margarethe von Trotta. Screenings will include six films by Von Trotta (The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum [Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum, co-dir.Volker Schlöndorff, West Germany, 1975];The Second Awakening of Christa Klages [Das zweite Erwachen der Christa Klages, West Germany, 1978]; Marianne and Juliane [Die bleierne Zeit, West Germany, 1981]; Rosa Luxemburg[West Germany, 1986]; Vision(Vision – Aus dem Leben der Hildegard von Bingen, Germany, 2009]; Hannah Arendt[Germany, 2012]) and six films by Leone (A Fistful of Dollars [Per un pugno di dollari, Italy/West Germany/Spain, 1961]; For a Few Dollars More [Per qualche dollaro in più, Italy/West Germany/Spain, 1965]; The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly [Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo, Italy/West Germany/Spain/USA, 1966]; Once Upon a Time in the West [C'era una volta il West, Italy/USA/Spain, 1968]; Duck, You Sucker! [Giù la testa, Italy/Spain/USA, 1971]; Once Upon a Time in America [C'era una volta in America, Italy/USA, 1984]).

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: S. MacKenzie


FILM 306/3.0                                         Comparative Contemporary Film in Europe

Intermediate study of thematic and stylistic trends in recent European cinema, with reference to social and political changes. NOTE Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.


FILM 308/3.0 Winter                            Popular Cultures

Just a joke: Women in Comedy

 

This course will explore the performances of gender within various comedy scenes and medias from the post-war period to present day North America, focusing primarily on the ways that women resist, denaturalize, take pleasure in, and expose the terms of femininity through comedic performances. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students.

 

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24S;48P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0).

Instructor: L. Rodgers


FILM 312/3.0 Fall and Winter                   Screenwriting

 Approaches to dramatic storytelling for the screen. Students analyze examples from existing works and, through practical exercises, prepare a short, original screenplay.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36S;72P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 315/3.0 Fall                                         Communication Technologies and Creative Practice

Intermediate study in the evolution of digital visual communications theory and practice. Covers readings about social and technological developments in computer mediated communication, and involves creative investigation of interactive digital media through design projects.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: A. Guerrero Cortés


FILM 322/3.0 Winter                                      Canadian Film and Television to 1980

Intermediate study in history and critical analysis, from early cinema to the tax-shelter boom and the institution of Telefilm Canada.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: B. Allan


FILM 331/3.0 Winter                                       Women and Film

Intermediate study in feminist approaches to the cinema and to films produced by women. Critical examination of critical and theoretical literature, and examples of narrative, documentary, and experimental cinemas.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (Level 3 and registration in a GNDS Plan and GNDS 120/3.0, GNDS 125/3.0).

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 335/3.0 Winter                                    Culture and Technology

Research and studies in relations of media, technology, and culture. Critical examination of cultural and communication technologies and the employment of technology within selected examples from film, television, and digital media. NOTE Only offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24O;48P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0).

Instructor: P. Gauthier


FILM 337/3.0 Fall                                         Cinema and the City

An intermediate study of representations of the city in cinema and visual culture, the social histories from which these representations emerge, and the changing environments in which cinema is viewed. NOTE Also offered at the Bader International Studies Centre, Herstmonceux. Learning Hours may vary.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (Level 3 and registration in a GPHY Plan and GPHY 101/3.0, GPHY 227/3.0, GPHY 229/3.0).

Instructor: K. Zaiontz


STSC 339/3.0 Winter                                        Media and Performance

An intermediate study that examines how performance shapes our social experiences and lived identities. From the daily acts of self-performance on social media to mega events, performance binds contemporary cultural practices, small and large. NOTE Students will be required to attend a limited number of Kingston-based cultural productions over the course of the term. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;12G;12Oc;60P) PREREQUISITE Level 3 and registration in an ARTH, ARTV, DRAM, FILM, MUSC or STSC Plan.

Instructor: K. Zaiontz

STSC courses may be used as Optional Film units.


FILM 340/3.0 Winter                                        Advertising and Consumer Culture

This course reviews advertising strategies across a range of different media to understand the construction and functions of consumer culture and citizenship in politics, economics, art, and everyday life. We shall critically examine theories and case studies primarily from North America. NOTE Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning hours may vary. NOTE Assignments include online and on-campus exams, online discussion forum participation requirement, short reflective essays, and some creative design work.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;36O;36P) PREREQUISITE (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0) or (COMM 131/3.0 or COMM 231/3.0 or PSYC 342/3.0).

Instructor: I. Robinson


FILM 345/3.0 Fall                                         Television: Structure and Function

In this course we will look at the role of television in shaping cultures, worldviews, and understandings of self and identity, including issues of gender, race, class, ethnicity and others. We will explore a range of examples from the broadcast network era to present day web-series considering how television has changed as the result of globalization, industrial convergence, digital media, and participatory culture. 

 

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: B. Bonnis


FILM 351/3.0 Winter                              Documentary Production

Advanced motion picture production course. Each student produces a short documentary using video and/or 16mm film. Emphasis will be placed on unconventional approaches and techniques. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;30G;30P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 351/3.0; FILM 355/6.0.

Instructor: D. Naaman


FILM 352/3.0 Winter                           Production: Issues of Form and Structure

Advanced practical course in film and video aesthetics. Starting with the screening and analysis of selected works, each student will script, produce and edit a short video or 16mm work that explores particular formal questions. Emphasis will be placed on unconventional approaches and techniques. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: G. Kibbins


FILM 353/3.0 Fall and Winter                Narrative Production

An advanced course on the conception, planning, shooting, and editing of narrative film and television. Working in groups of four, students will produce short, professional quality videos (maximum length eight minutes) for a public screening. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;30G;30P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 353/3.0; FILM 365/6.0.

Instructor: A. Guerrero Cortés


FILM 356/3.0 Fall                               Animation Production

A combined study of the history and theory of film animation with the production of animated films. Requirements will include both research essays as well as the conceptualization and production of an animated film. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 356/3.0; FILM 385/6.0

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 360/3.0 Fall                          The Documentary Tradition

Intermediate critical and historical study in non-fiction film and television, based on selected examples from Canada, including productions of the National Film Board and the CBC, and international documentary cinemas.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 355/6.0; FILM 360/3.0.

Instructor: D. Naaman


FILM 368/3.0 Fall                      Animation Theory and Criticism

A course on the history, theory, and practice of animated films. Requirements include a series of screenings, writings, and a practice based critical project.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;12Oc;60P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 368/3.0; FILM 385/6.0.

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 370/3.0 Fall                  The Experimental Tradition

“Handmade and Process Cinemas”

In 2018-2019, we will be exploring handmade and process cinemas, terms used to describe the material manipulation of analog and digital works in the experimental tradition through artisanal practices such as scratching on film, tinting and toning, painting on film, glitching, solarisation, hand processing, and using environmental factors (such as mold, radiation, and environmental damage) in the production of works. Artists include Peggy Ahwesh, Pia Arke, Stan Brakhage, Mary Ellen Bute, Isidore Isou, Helen Hill, Philip Hoffman, Evelyn Lambart, Len Lye, Deirdre Logue, Norman McLaren, Marie Menken, László Moholy-Nagy, Caroline Monnet, Man Ray, Jenn Reeves, Carolee Schneemann,Phil Solomon, and Joyce Wieland.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 370/3.0; FILM 375/6.0.

Instructor: S. MacKenzie


FILM 395/3.0                            Internship

Students can apply to undertake a practical internship in media production, criticism or curatorship. All internships must be approved in advance by application to the Undergraduate Coordinator. Approval will depend on the quality of the proposal and the academic record of the applicant. Students are required to write a report about their experience and are evaluated jointly by their employer and a faculty member from Film and Media. It is the responsibility of students, not the Department of Film and Media, to arrange internships. NOTE Students will be given a grade of Pass/Fail for work done.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (120I) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM and permission of the Department.


FILM 410/3.0 Fall                        Video Production for Digital Media

Creative investigation of media, culture, and technology, focused through the medium of video from its invention to its current digital forms. Practical experiments will be guided by critical texts and case studies that contextualize video-based practices in a variety of fields. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 24.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: E. Pelstring


FILM 415/3.0 Fall                Contemporary Theory: Special Topic

Remediation: Archives and the Textures of Time

This course is focused on the study and creation of new archival processes and forms of access for the robust audio-visual histories of media makers whose cameras and microphones are used to contribute to community resilience, and as tools of critical reflection of colonial and patriarchal archives. We will work in the state-of-the-art Vulnerable Media Lab and in the seminar to “make the old new again” through remediation projects. We will work with “born digital media” alongside a variety of “obsolete” and “marginal” media, all of which share their own kinds of material vulnerabilities. We will develop methods and processes to ensure this media art history is preserved and made available according to culturally specific and ethically driven forms of access, thus engaging in new conversations about cultural heritage.

 

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructor: S. Lord


FILM 430/3.0 Winter                     Authorship: Special Topic

Advanced seminar on cinema authorship. Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane and Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause are two cornerstones of US cinema in the studio era.  Over seven decades, these two artists followed parallel paths, from their Wisconsin childhoods, through theatre and radio, to Hollywood and beyond, and yet their work was individually distinctive and, to varying degrees, distinguished.  Through discussion of a selection of films and readings by and about the two directors, this course examines Welles and Ray and their work in the frames of personal, professional, and cultural history.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 400/3.0-001 (2014 onward); FILM 430/3.0.

Instructor: B. Allan


FILM 435/3.0 Winter                  Culture and Representation - Special Topic: Indigenous Women's Film and Media

Film 435 is a journey into Indigenous and Inuit Women’s film, videography and contemporary media projects. Inspired by the amazing works of strong and dedicated Indigenous women from the Americas and from Australia, this course will explore such topics as indigenous methodologies and aesthetics, indigenous feminism, visual sovereignty, decolonization, self-recognition, survivance, language revitalization and cultural reappropriation.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 400/3.0-003 (2014 onward); FILM 435/3.0.

Instructor: K. Bertrand


FILM 440/3.0 Fall                       Non-narrative Film: Special Topic

“Self-Reflexive Cinemas”

In 2018-2019, we will be exploring self-reflexive cinema in fiction and non-fiction works, and the ways in which a process of political self-reflexivity challenges the ideologies that underlie dominant forms of narrative cinema and the political certitudes of realism. Engaging with questions arising from debates around class, gender, Indigeneity, colonialism, queer studies, and formalism, we will consider works by a range of artists, including: Peter Brook, Věra Chytilová, Federico Fellini, Ritwik Ghatak, Jean-Luc Godard, John Greyson, Jørgen Leth, Djibril Diop Mambéty, Dušan Makavejev, Victor Masayesva, Albert and David Maysles, Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen, Pierre Perrault, Sally Potter, Marlon Riggs, Jean Rouch, Helma Sanders-Brahms, Vilgot Sjöman, Agnès Varda, and Charlotte Zwerin.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department. EXCLUSION No more than one course from FILM 400/3.0-005 (2014 onward); FILM 440/3.0.

Instructor: S. MacKenzie


FILM 445/3.0 Winter                    Narrative Film: Special Topic - Latin American Cinema

Latin American Cinema: ​This course explores the thematic and stylistic trends of Latin American Cinema(s) with an emphasis on how each one reflects or rejects its particular social, political, and cultural context.  Students will examine a selection of Latin American films in order to explore not only the aesthetic contributions the films have made, but also how they represent discourses of memory, history, gender, race, class, and identity. 

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructor: A. Guerrero Cortés


FILM 450/3.0 Winter                 The Business of Media

A 12-week course that serves as a general primer on the current business of media in Canada as it pertains to narrative storytelling. Students explore business considerations throughout the production cycle, from development to production to distribution and marketing, as well as examine various different career paths in media.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Oc;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 24.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructor: A. Jansen


FILM 455/3.0 Fall                   Cross-Platform Storytelling

A practical special topic course that explores how a single story can be told across different popular media with special attention to emerging platforms and technologies, from graphic novels to video games, augmented reality to virtual reality.

LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructor: A. Jansen


FILM 460/6.0 Fall/Winter              Major Project

Seminar that draws on students' previous work to enhance advanced research, production and writing for final project in creative writing, criticism, journalism, production and/or curating and programming film, media, and digital culture. Topics from theory, criticism, and history of film, media, digital culture, film festivals, media arts exhibitions and museums will be addressed to suit individuals. Examples from narrative, documentary, experimental film or digital media art will be analyzed. Student projects will be published online and/or exhibited at the new Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. NOTE Open to FILM Major students only.

LEARNING HOURS 228 (36L;36G;36O;120Oc) PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major Plan and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructors: S. MacKenzie/D. Naaman/G. Kibbins


FILM 500/6.0 Honours Thesis

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. May be an essay or a film or video project. Apply for FILM 500/6.0 or FILM 501/3.0, but not both, to the Undergraduate Coordinator by end of Level 3. NOTE To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


FILM 501/3.0 Honours Thesis

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. May be an essay or a film or video project. Apply for FILM 500/6.0 or FILM 501/3.0, but not both, to the Undergraduate Coordinator by end of Level 3. NOTE To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


FILM 510/6.0 Directed Studies

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. Enables a student to pursue an area of study not covered in regularly offered courses. Applicants must obtain approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator and supervising instructor. NOTE To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


FILM 511/3.0 Directed Studies

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. Enables a student to pursue an area of study not covered in regularly offered courses. Applicants must obtain approval of the Undergrad Coordinator and supervising instructor. NOTE To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department

 


 

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