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Interactive sessions focus on Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

In support of Queen’s University’s ongoing effort to help answer to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Faculty of Health Sciences is hosting a series of interactive sessions from May 15-17, led by Barry Lavallee, a member of Manitoba First Nation and Métis communities and a University of Manitoba-trained family physician specializing in Indigenous health and northern practice.

“We are so pleased to have Dr. Lavallee on campus to host three sessions with staff, faculty and students,” says Leslie Flynn, Vice Dean, Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, “I know that his time here will bolster our efforts to meet our commitment to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action as they apply to healthcare and health professions education. We are engaged in a process of fostering inclusion in the Faculty of Health Sciences and hosting important conversations about Indigeneity, cultural safety and our healthcare system.”

A dynamic presenter, Dr. Lavallee speaks articulately, practically, and passionately on issues of social justice in medicine across Canada. Dr. Lavallee’s clinical work has focused on the health and healing needs of First Nation and Métis communities. He has a Masters of Clinical Sciences from the University of Western Ontario and his research and clinical areas are chronic diseases, transgenerational trauma, impact of colonization on Indigenous communities and international Indigenous health. 

“As physicians and health care providers our role in addressing reconciliation is to critically examine the role Indigenous specific racism plays as a determinant of health for Indigenous Peoples,” Dr. Lavallee says. “More specifically, what role do we play in addressing this form of racism in our profession?”

The three interactive events are:

May 15, 4 pm
Racism as an Indigenous Social Determinant of Health
Public Lecture – Britt Smith Lecture Hall, School of Medicine

May 16, 8 am
Teaching Methods for Addressing Cultural Safety: Promoting Indigenous Health
Faculty Development Workshop – University Club, George Teves Room

May 17, 8 am
Indigenizing Educational Research and Workforces in Healthcare: Struggles and a way forward
Heath Science Education Round – Richardson Laboratory, Room 104

Of special note, following Dr. Lavallee’s presentation on Wednesday, Laura Maracle, Indigenous Cultural Safety Coordinator for Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre, will lead attendees in the KAIROS blanket exercise, a participatory history lesson developed in collaboration with Indigenous Elders, knowledge keepers, and educators that fosters truth, understanding, respect and reconciliation among Indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.

This series was developed collaboratively between the Indigenous Health Education Working Group, Faculty of Health Sciences Decanal Leadership, and the Office of Professional Development and Educational Scholarship.

To learn more or to register for the programs, visit the Faculty of Health Sciences website.