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Queen’s PhD candidate chasing 3MT national title

The national competition for the Three Minute Thesis is currently underway and Amanda Brissenden is representing Queen’s University.

[Amanda Brissenden]
Amanda Brissenden won first prize at the Queen's Three Minute Thesis competition.

After taking top spot in the Queen’s 3MT and then earning a national berth with a third-place finish at the Ontario competition, Brissenden, a PhD candidate in Chemical Engineering, who specializes in Biomedical Engineering, is one of 12 contestants from across the country.

The national competition is conducted via videos from the regional events. The videos are currently available on the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) 3MT website. The winner will be selected by a team of judges and announced in the first week of June.

At the same time, the People’s Choice Award is decided through online votes and the Queen’s community can help Brissenden by viewing her video and casting a ballot online.

The voting period for the People’s Choice Award is currently open and concludes on Sunday, May 26.

“The 3MT is an excellent opportunity for graduate students to hone their communications skills and share the impact of their work with the local, national and global communities”, says Fahim Quadir, Vice-Provost and Dean, School of Graduate Studies. “Amanda has done a remarkable job of explaining her interdisciplinary research in a concise yet engaging manner. We are very proud that she represents Queen’s at the national 3MT and we wish her the best for her participation in this competition.”

Brissenden’s presentation, “Building Blocks for a Healthier Spine,” delves into her research which involves using polymers to augment the human spine and help alleviate pain.

To learn more about the Three Minute Thesis, visit the Queen’s 3MT webpage.