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Building a strong foundation of leadership

  • Human Resources Foundational Leadership Program
    Kate Kittner and Viet Tran talk about their experiences in taking the Queen's Foundational Leadership Program during the graduation ceremony.
  • Human Resources Foundational Leadership Program
    Participants in the Queen's Foundational Leadership Program speaks with sponsors and visitors about their final presentations at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.
  • Human Resources Foundational Leadership Program
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf speaks to the latest cohort of the Queen's Foundational Leadership Program during the graduation ceremony.

When Kate Kittner signed up for the Queen’s Foundational Leadership Program offered by Human Resources, she was hoping to build upon her managerial skillset and to enhance those skills through formal training and interaction with others from across the university.

Reflecting as she completed the program, that’s exactly what she got, she says.

The comprehensive program helps managers at Queen’s gain advanced training in leadership development including best practices in management, communication and coaching skills, and strengthening employee engagement. Gaining skills through 14 classroom sessions, the participants then form teams and apply this knowledge as they develop a project that supports an aspect of the university’s strategic framework.

The groups presented their final projects during a graduation event at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

A key element of the program is the use of self-reflection, something that Kittner found very useful.

“I gained a better understanding of my strengths and how to leverage those, but also how to improve my weaker areas. Through self-reflection on my weaknesses, I can focus in on how to do things differently,” says Kittner, Office Manager of Professional Development & Educational Scholarship at the Faculty of Health Sciences. “It’s not a massive change, but a different way of approaching things depending on who you are working with. It is meeting them in a more comfortable, collaborative way, resulting in successful working relationships. It really makes you think about what you bring to the team, good and bad, and how to adapt your approach to teamwork.”

Viet Tran, Mechanical Engineer at Physical Plant Services, heard about the Queen’s Foundational Leadership Program from colleagues who had taken it previously and thought that it would help him further develop his skills and provide a valuable networking opportunity.

“I consistently try to improve myself and the program was definitely a great opportunity to assist us in growing as leaders, especially the first part when we completed numerous self-assessments,” he says. “I also liked the group component, the Action Learning Project. I had a similar experience in an MBA program. It’s a good opportunity to take the things that you’ve learned in the beginning and apply them at the end.”

This year’s Action Learning Projects touched upon an array of topics including academic advising, employee recruitment, institutional data, and support for students with autism spectrum disorder.

The Queen’s Foundational Leadership Program has been running for 10 years now and over that time Shannon Hill, Learning and Development Specialist, Human Resources, has seen the course evolve and improve with each cohort. Looking over the long term, Hill says that the status of the program has continued to grow and meet the needs of the participants while at the same time creating an extensive network across the institution.

“We’re seeing some good momentum in terms of numbers of graduates. You talk about the tipping point when enough managers have been involved in this program and a common language, understanding and competency level is achieved. I think the main thing is the camaraderie, the network they develop and continue to grow and sustain themselves over years, so that’s been nice to see,” Hill says, adding that past graduates return for the closing event to support their colleagues. “You’re really seeing that reputation of the program grow and the results we’re seeing from it are quite pervasive across our professional managerial group at Queen’s.”

Announced at the final event is that the office of the Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) will formally review all the projects and provide support for those meeting the university’s priorities.

Another new development, Hill adds, is the creation of the Foundational Leadership Alumni Group, which will meet for the first time on June 20. This meeting will bring together past participants in the program to discuss the direction for the new group.

“This is really going to formalize that community of practice, that professional network for graduates of the program of the last 10 years,” Hill says.

The next cohort is scheduled to start January 2020 with applications being accepted December 2019.

Visit the Human Resources website to learn more about the Queen’s Foundational Leadership Program.

Championing sustainability on campus

Queen’s Hospitality Services is making the university’s carbon footprint smaller.

Queen's Hospitality kitchen staff preparing meals.
Queen's Hospitality staff participating in Forward Food - a two-day culinary training program focused on plant-based meals.

Each year, Queen’s Hospitality Services works to reduce waste and make its carbon footprint smaller. Sustainable Kingston, a non-profit organization created by the city, has recognized these efforts by naming Hospitality Services the 2019 Organizational Sustainability Champion.

Hospitality Services operates the food services on campus, and it runs a range of initiatives to lessen its environmental impact and promote food security. One of its ongoing goals has been to significantly cut down the number of single-use items on campus. In September 2018, for instance, all in-house retail brands operated by Hospitality Services switched entirely to paper straws, which has diverted an estimated 280,000 plastic straws from landfills over the past academic year.

Through the ECO Beverage Card incentive program, Hospitality Services has also reduced the consumption of single-use cups on campus by 10 per cent. Launched in 2018, the ECO Beverage Card rewards customers for using reusable mugs by granting one free coffee or tea when they collect 7 stamps on their card.

Most recently, Hospitality Services has prevented the waste of approximately 100,000 single-serving plastic cups simply by adopting bulk sauce pumps, which customers use to apply condiments directly to their food.

Through its We Love Local initiative, Hospitality Services pairs its environmental mission with investment in the regional economy. It works with Deodato’s, a local produce wholesaler, to purchase in-season fruit from over 27 farmers in Ontario and Quebec. Buying food this way not only supports area farms, it is environmentally friendly, as it does not rely on the large amounts of fossil fuels that are required to transport produce internationally.

Since early 2018 Hospitality Services have facilitated the donation of over 1,700 meals at campus dining halls through Swipe It Forward. This program enables students to give their unused meal-plan swipes to peers who are facing food insecurity, simultaneously diverting waste and distributing food to those who need it. All unused food on campus is also donated daily to local charities.

Hospitality Services is also working to lessen its carbon footprint by expanding its offerings of plant-based foods, which are more environmentally friendly than meals centred on meat. Over reading week, for example, nineteen chefs at Queen’s took part in Forward Food, a two-day culinary training program focused on preparing plant-based food. Rustic Roots, which serves only vegan dishes, also opened this year in the Ban Righ dining hall.

“By paying attention to every detail, we’re working to eliminate as much waste as we can and to constantly reduce our carbon footprint,” says Jennifer Pete, Associate Director Housing and Ancillary Services. “At Hospitality Services, we see ourselves as an integral part of the university’s efforts to promote sustainability. I think we’re showing that promoting food security and protecting the environment go hand in hand. And we’re very honored that Sustainable Kingston has chosen us as the 2019 Organizational Sustainability Champion.”

The initiatives run by Hospitality Services are a part of Queen’s broader efforts to create a culture of sustainability. Ongoing initiatives, such as the 2019 Commuter Challenge, the Transpass Program, and Dropbike, for example, have encouraged members of the Queen’s community to use sustainable methods of transportation. And recent infrastructure developments, such as the District Energy Project, have increased energy efficiency and reduced emissions. All of these different initiatives are helping Queen’s fulfill its Climate Action Plan. Signed by Principal Woolf in 2016, this plan sets the goal for the university to become carbon neutral by 2040.  

Sources of inspiration for new graduates

  • Faculty of Law Convocation 2019
    Honorary degree recipient Fiona Sampson (Artsci’85, Law’93) is hooded by Dean Bill Flanagan during the convocation ceremony for the Faculty of Law on Thursday, June 6. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Faculty of Law Convocation 2019
    Honorary degree recipient Fiona Sampson shakes hands with Bill Flanagan, Dean of the Faculty of Law, as Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Alex Da Silva look on.
  • Faculty of Law Convocation 2019
    Graduates from the Faculty of Law are hooded while Erik Knutsen, Associate Dean (Academic), struggles with a hood during the convocation ceremony on Thursday afternoon.
  • Sir Richard Evans honorary degree
    British historian and author Sir Richard Evans receives his honorary degree from Queen's University during Thursday morning's convocation ceremony. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Sir Richard Evans honorary degree
    Sir Richard Evans speaks to the graduands from the Faculty of Arts and Science after receiving an honorary degree at Grant Hall on Thursday, June 6. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Sir Richard Evans honorary degree
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Alex Da Silva share a funny moment on the stage at Grant Hall on Thursday. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Faculty of Education Convocation
    Two graduands from the Faculty of Education are hooded during the Spring Convocation ceremony on Thursday afternoon at Grant Hall. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Faculty of Education Convocation
    Elder-in-Residence for the Faculty of Education Deb St. Amant presents a blanket to a graduate during Thursday afternoon's convocation ceremony. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Faculty of Education Convocation
    A group of graduates from the Faculty of Education celebrate outside of Grant Hall on Thursday, June, 6. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)

Queen’s presented two more honorary degrees on the sixth day of Spring Convocation at the university.

Sir Richard Evans, a British historian and author, was presented with his honorary degree during the morning ceremony at Grant Hall. Throughout his academic career Sir Richard has received a number of key appointments, including as Regius Professor of History in 2008 until retiring in 2014, and as president of Wolfson College, Cambridge from 2010-2017. He is currently Provost of Gresham College in the City of London, which has been offering free lectures for the general public since 1597. Sir Richard is the author of more than 20 books. His three-volume history of Nazi Germany (The Coming of the Third Reich, The Third Reich in Power, and The Third Reich at War) has been translated into 15 languages.

Fiona Sampson (Artsci’85, Law’93) was recognized during the afternoon ceremony for dedicating her 20-plus year career to seeking justice for society’s disadvantaged: disabled persons, refugees, Indigenous persons, and victims of violence. Sampson founded the equality effect, an NGO that uses international human rights law to make girls/women’s rights real and, as CEO, led her team to the landmark 160 Girls High Court victory in Kenya. She has published widely relating to women’s and girls’ equality and has received many awards and much recognition for her human rights work.

A total of seven honorary degrees are being conferred by Queen’s during convocation.

Spring Convocation will resume on Tuesday, June 11 with two ceremonies being held at main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC).

A total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation, with the final one scheduled for Wednesday, June 12. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

More photos can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Membership of Principal’s Advisory Committee, Smith School of Business

On behalf of Principal Daniel Woolf, Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) has announced the membership of the committee that will advise him on the deanship and the present state and future prospects of the Smith School of Business.

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

  • Kandice Baptiste - Director, Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre
  • Joanna Bitharas - MBA Candidate 2020, President, Student Executive Council
  • Yolande Chan - Associate Dean (Research, PhD and MSc Programs) and E. Marie Shantz Professor of IT Management
  • Shawn Cooper - Managing Director and Regional Leader, Russell Reynolds Associates, member of the Smith Advisory Board
  • Tina Dacin - Stephen J. R. Smith Chaired Professor of Strategy and Organizational Behavior
  • Tom Harris (Chair) - Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)
  • Yuri Levin - Professor & Stephen J.R. Smith Chair of Analytics; Executive Director, Analytics and AI; and Director, Scotiabank Centre for Customer Analytics
  • Rebecca Luce-Kapler - Dean, Faculty of Education
  • Bertrand Malsch - Associate Professor & PricewaterhouseCoopers/Tom O'Neill Fellow of Accounting and Director of the CPA Ontario Centre for Governance & Accountability
  • Lynnette Purda - Professor & RBC Fellow of Finance
  • Laurie Ross - Executive Director, Dean’s Office
  • Stephanie Simpson - Associate Vice-Principal (Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion)
  • Lori Stewart (Secretary) - Executive Director, Office of the Provost and Vice Principal (Academic)
  • Ann Tierney - Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs
  • Maryann Turcke - COO of the National Football League, Chair of the Smith Advisory Board
  • Wei Wang - Associate Professor & RBC Fellow of Finance and Director of Queen’s Master of Finance (Beijing) Program

Commerce Society leadership will participate by meeting with the committee to discuss undergraduate student considerations. Principal Woolf thanks the members of this committee for their willingness to serve.

Dedicated service to Queen’s

  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 11
    Deborah Turnbull (Artsci'75) delivers a speech after receiving an honorary degree during the 11th ceremony of Spring Convocation.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 11
    A PhD recipient reacts as he is hooded during the 11th ceremony of Spring Convocation in Grant Hall.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 11
    A master's degree recipient shakes hands with Chancellor Jim Leech during the afternoon ceremony of Spring Convocation on Wednesday, June 5.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Day 5
    Chancellor Jim Leech shakes hands with a graduate and poses for a photo during the morning convocation ceremony on Wednesday, June 5.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Day 5
    A pair of graduands from the Faculty of Arts and Science are hooded during the 10th ceremony of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 10
    Graduands from the Faculty of Arts and Science are hooded as Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniell Woolf awaits to congratulate them.

Spring Convocation at Queen’s entered the second half of its schedule on Wednesday, June 5 with the 10th and 11th ceremonies being held at Grant Hall.

The sun returned as the university conferred an honorary degree upon Deborah Turnbull (Artsci’75), who served as a member of the Queen’s University Council (1990-2002) and has organized events for her graduation class. For her more than 40 years of distinguished voluntary and professional service, she received the 2018 Queen’s Alumni Toronto Branch Award. Over her career, Turnbull has worked with the International Development Research Centre, Agrodev Canada, and Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME) and taught international development studies courses at the University of Toronto. She is or has been on the board or chaired a number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Queen’s is presenting a total of seven honorary degrees during convocation.

Three more ceremonies will be held Thursday, June 6, with honorary degrees being conferred upon Sir Richard Evans in the morning and Fiona Sampson in the afternoon.

A total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation, with the final one scheduled for Wednesday, June 12. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

More photos can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Bell CEO receives honorary degree from Queen’s

  • George Cope - Honorary Degree
    George Cope, President and CEO of of BCE Inc. and Bell Canada, speaks to graduands after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's on Tuesday, June 4.
  • George Cope - Honorary Degree
    George Cope, President and CEO of of BCE Inc. and Bell Canada, is hooded as he receives an honorary degree from Queen's on Tuesday, June 4. (University Communications/Lars Hagberg)
  • George Cope - Honorary Degree
    George Cope, President and CEO of of BCE Inc. and Bell Canada, speaks with Heather Stuart, the Bell Mental Health and Anti-Stigma Research Chair. (University Communications/Lars Hagberg)
  • Convocation Ceremony 8
    Parents and family members take photos and videos of their graduating students at a Spring Convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
  • Convocation Ceremony 8
    Barbara Crow, Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science, speaks to graduands during the Spring Convocation ceremony Tuesday afternoon.
  • Convocation Ceremony 8
    A PhD recipient is hooded as Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf looks on at Grant Hall.
  • Convocation Ceremony 8
    A pair of graduands are hooded during the eighth ceremony of Spring Convocation on Tuesday at Grant Hall.
  • A graduand from the Faculty of Arts and Science
    A graduand from the Faculty of Arts and Science is hooded during the ninth ceremony of Spring Conviocation at Queen's University. (University Communications/Lars Hagberg)

Day 4 of Spring Convocation at Queen’s was a busy day for the university with three ceremonies being held at Grant Hall.

An honorary degree was conferred upon George Cope, President and Chief Executive Officer of BCE Inc. and Bell Canada.

Cope was recognized for leading Canada’s largest communications company with a strategy of unparalleled investment and innovation in broadband networks and wireless, TV, internet and media growth services. Cope also led the launch of the Bell Let’s Talk initiative, the largest-ever corporate commitment to Canadian mental health and now one of the country’s most prominent community investment campaigns.

Queen’s is presenting a total of seven honorary degrees during convocation.

Two ceremonies will be held Wednesday, June 5, with an honorary degree being conferred upon Deborah Turnbull during the afternoon ceremony.

Overall, a total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation, with the final one on Wednesday, June 12. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

More photos can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Employee and Family Assistance Program provider publishes June edition of Life Lines

Read the June edition of Life Lines.

As the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) provider for Queen’s University, Homewood Health publishes a number of regular newsletters, including Lifelines.

The monthly newsletter is intended to support key personnel with a wealth of information on the topic presented. The June edition is entitled “PTSD in the Workplace: Solutions and Support.”

For more information on the Queen’s EFAP, visit the Human Resources website.

For 24-hour EFAP services call 1-800-663-1142 (English) or 1-866-398-9505 (French).

Ce fichier est disponible en francais.

 

Lynda.com transitions to LinkedIn Learning

Lynda.com, an e-learning and training website for software, technology, business, and creative skills, is rebranding as LinkedIn Learning. LinkedIn acquired the service in 2015 and is now moving to make valuable feature upgrades in addition to rebranding. Lynda.com is currently available to Queen’s faculty, staff, and students with a valid NetID. It will remain so after the transition to LinkedIn Learning is complete. 

What does this mean for me? 

On Aug. 7, 2019, the Lynda.com platform will be upgraded to LinkedIn Learning. In preparation for the upgrade, users of Lynda.com will receive an email in mid-July, advising of the transition and what this means for you. Once the upgrade is complete, you will receive an email directly from LinkedIn Learning with an activation link.  When that email arrives, use the link to activate your new LinkedIn Learning account for an enhanced user experience that features instructional content relevant to your professional interests and goals.  

If you are not currently using Lynda.com but would like to ensure that you are included in the migration and receive important communications about the upgrade, make sure you log into Lynda.com using your netID and password before July 5, 2019. 

What will happen to my Lynda.com data? 

When a Lynda.com user migrates from Lynda.com to LinkedIn Learning, all their Lynda.com data (such as learning activity) will be transferred to their new LinkedIn Learning account. After the migration, your Lynda.com account will not be accessible, and all learning will occur within the LinkedIn Learning platform. However, since LinkedIn Learning contains the full Lynda.com content library, you’ll be able to pick up your learning right where you left off. 

LinkedIn Learning combines Lynda.com’s high-quality courses with insights from LinkedIn data to provide you with personalized course recommendations based on your current job, skills, and interests.  

How can I get help? 

To find out more about the upgrade, visit https://www.queensu.ca/lynda. If you have any questions or concerns, or if you are unsure how to access Lynda.com and LinkedIn Learning, please contact the IT Support Centre at 613-533-6666 or by filling out the Online Help Form. 

Eyes on the sky as Spring Convocation resumes

  • Spring Convocation 2019 Terence Dickinson
    Terence Dickinson receives his honorary degree from Chancellor Jim Leech and Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf during the convocation ceremony Monday afternoon at Grant Hall. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 6
    A graduate looks for his family in the balcony of Grant Hall as he poses for a photo with Chancellor Jim Leech during the sixth ceremony of Spring Convocation. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Spring Convocation 2019 big 3
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Alex Da Silva welcome graduands to the fifth ceremony of Spring Convocation on Monday, June 3.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 6
    A group of graduands from the Bachelor of Computing program gather for a photo before they take to the stage at Grant Hall. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 5
    Graduands from the Faculty of Arts and Science listen to Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf during the morning convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 5
    A PhD recipient is hooded by Gordon Smith, Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations) for the Faculty of Arts and Science while Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf looks on.
  • Spring Convocation 2019 Ceremony 6
    Doctoral students exit Kingston Hall and make their way to Grant Hall where they will receive their PhDs. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)
  • Spring Convocation 2019
    Graduates from the Master of Public Health program celebrate after receiving their degrees on Monday, June 3. (Queen's University/Lars Hagberg)

Spring Convocation 2019 resumed on Monday, June 3, with two more ceremonies being held at Grant Hall.

In the day’s afternoon ceremony accomplished amateur astronomer and astrophotographer Terence Dickinson received an honorary degree. Having authored 15 books on astronomy, Dickinson has brought the night skies to Canadians through multiple platforms including radio, television, and SkyNews, Canada’s national astronomy magazine.

Queen’s is presenting a total of seven honorary degrees during convocation.

Three more ceremonies will be held Tuesday, June 4. Overall, a total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation, with the final one on Wednesday, June 12.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

More photos can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Creating meaningful land acknowledgements

[Land Acknowledgement Workshop]
Laura Maracle, Indigenous Cultural Safety Coordinator at the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre in Student Affairs, and Dale Bennett, an Indigenous student from Tyendinaga Territory, who is attending the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program at Queen’s Faculty of Education, lead the recently held land acknowledgement workshop. (University Communications)

The Office of Indigenous Initiatives has introduced a land acknowledgement workshop to teach campus community members about the historical significance of the traditional lands that Queen’s University occupies, and to understand the importance of land acknowledgement statements.

Indigenous History Month
June is Indigenous History Month in Canada.
In recognition of this the Gazette is highlighting a number of articles over the coming weeks.
To learn more about Indigenous Supports at Queen’s University, visit the Inclusive Queen’s webpage.
Information is also available at the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre website.

Developed in response to the high demand for Indigenous cultural services on campus, this collaborative experience encouraged the first 25 attendees on Tuesday, May 28 to move beyond standard land acknowledgements and embrace a more reflective and intentional approach.

The two-hour workshop also gave participants the opportunity to create their own personalized land acknowledgments and practice in a safe setting. It reached capacity two days after registration opened, and there is currently a wait list for people who wish to attend future land acknowledgement workshops.

“Creating personal land acknowledgements is a part of reconciliation for all people,” says Vanessa McCourt, Coordinator, Office of Indigenous Initiatives. “By giving participants the space to develop their own land acknowledgements, they are able to see themselves in this process and work towards right relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.”

The workshop was run by Laura Maracle, Indigenous Cultural Safety Coordinator at the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre in Student Affairs, and Dale Bennett, an Indigenous student from Tyendinaga Territory, who is attending the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) at Queen’s Faculty of Education.

Bennett helped develop the workshop during his three-week practicum with the Office of Indigenous Initiatives.

“The goal in creating this workshop is for land acknowledgements to become more meaningful and impactful by tying the participants’ own experiential background into acknowledging the traditional lands in which they occupy,” he says. “A part of my journey at Queen's and through the ATEP program was connecting to my spirituality and culture, and I want to thank Vanessa and Laura who have been instrumental in passing down their teachings to me in order to inform this workshop”.

More sessions are being planned throughout the summer to continue these meaningful conversations.

“It’s important to have discussions about perspective and positionality on campus,” says McCourt. “This workshop allows participants to dig deeper into Indigenous history and traditions and situate themselves within a greater context of change.”

To learn more about Indigenous initiatives, resources and cultural services on campus, visit the Four Directions website.

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