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Honorary degrees for spring ceremonies

The presentation of honorary degrees is one of the many traditions of convocation. This spring, seven recipients will be honored during the ceremonies. All recipients were selected by Queen’s community members for their contributions to the local community, Canadian society, or the world.

The honorary degree recipients this year include:

Phil Gold, Doctor of Science DSc

[Phil Gold]
Phil Gold

Ceremony 2: Thursday, May 24 at 2:30 pm

Phil Gold is the Executive Director of the Clinical Research Centre of the McGill University Health Centre at the Montreal General Hospital (MGH) and the Douglas G. Cameron Professor of Medicine and Professor of Physiology and Oncology at McGill University. He has served as the Inaugural Director of the Goodman Cancer Centre, Chairman of the Department of Medicine at McGill, and Physician-in-Chief at the MGH.

Dr. Gold’s early research led to the discovery and definition of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA), and the subsequent CEA blood test. In 2006, the Phil Gold Chair in Medicine was inaugurated at McGill University. Dr. Gold was inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in 2010, and also received the Life Time Achievement Award from McGill University and the inaugural McGill University Faculty of Medicine Global Achievement Award in 2011.

Dr. Gold has received national and international recognition throughout his career, including the Gairdner Foundation Annual International Award (1978), Medizinische Hochschule, Germany (1978), the Johann-Georg-Zimmerman Prize for Cancer Research (1978), the Isaak Walton Killam Award in Medicine of the Canada Council (1985), the National Cancer Institute of Canada R.M. Taylor Medal (1992), the Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Medal (2002), and many other accolades, including honorary degrees from a number of universities.

Isabel Bassett, Doctor of Laws LLD

[Isabel Bassett]
Isabel Bassett

Ceremony 5: Friday, May 25 at 4 pm.

Professionally, Isabel Bassett was Chair and CEO of TVOntario, MPP and Minister of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation for the Ontario Government, and host and producer of award winning documentaries on CFTO TV, which focused on social issues such as sexual abuse, mental health, and teen gangs.

Now retired, Ms. Bassett is a facilitator using her know-how and connections to work for gender parity. She advocates to get young people more involved in politics and for more diversity on boards and in senior management positions. She is now adding her voice in support of the McMichael Gallery to awaken the public to Canada's little known treasure house of Canadian Art.

Indira Samarasekera, Doctor of Science DSc

[Indira Samarasekera]
Indira Samarasekera

Ceremony 12: Thursday, May 31 at 4 pm

Indira Samarasekera served as the twelfth President and Vice Chancellor of the University of Alberta from 2005 to 2015. She also served as Vice-President (Research) at the University of British Columbia from 2000 to 2005. She is currently a Senior Advisor for Bennett Jones LLP and serves on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Nova Scotia, Magna International, and TransCanada. Dr. Samarasekera was appointed by the Prime Minister to serve as a Federal Member to the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments until 2017.

Dr. Samarasekera is internationally recognized as one of Canada’s leading metallurgical engineers for her ground-breaking work on process engineering of materials, especially steel processing. Dr. Samarasekera was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2002 for outstanding contributions to steel process engineering. In 2014, she was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in the US, the profession’s highest honour.

As a Hays Fulbright Scholar, she earned an MSc from the University of California in 1976 and a PhD in metallurgical engineering from the University of British Columbia in 1980. She has received honorary degrees from the Universities of British Columbia, Toronto, Waterloo, Montreal, and from Western University in Canada, as well as Queen’s University in Belfast, Ireland.

Valerie Tarasuk, Doctor of Science DSc

[Valerie Tarasuk]
Valerie Tarasuk

Ceremony 13: Friday, June 1 at 10 am

Valerie Tarasuk is a professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences and Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Tarasuk’s research includes Canadian food policy and population-level dietary assessment, but much of her career has focused on income-related problems of food access in Canada. She played a pivotal role in the implementation of food insecurity monitoring in Canada and has helped spearhead efforts to use monitoring data to inform programming and policy decisions. Dr. Tarasuk has led PROOF, an interdisciplinary research program investigating household insecurity in Canada, since 2011. In 2017, Dr. Tarasuk was honored by the Canadian Nutrition Society with the Earle Willard McHenry Award for Distinguished Service in Nutrition.

John Baird, Doctor of Law LLD

[John Baird]
John Baird

Ceremony 14: Friday, June 1 at 2:30 pm

John Baird served as a senior cabinet minister in the Government of Canada. Mr. Baird spent three terms as a Member of Parliament and four years as Minister of Foreign Affairs. He also served as President of the Treasury Board, Minister of the Environment, Minister of Transport and Infrastructure, and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons. In 2010, he was selected by MPs from all parties as Parliamentarian of the Year. He is currently a Senior Business Advisor with Bennett Jones LLP.

An instrumental figure in bilateral trade and investment relationships, Mr. Baird has played a leading role in the Canada-China dialogue and worked to build ties with Southeast Asian nations.

Mr. Baird holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Political Studies from Queen’s. He volunteers his time with Community Living Ontario, the Prince's Charities, and is a board member of the Friends of Israel Initiative.

Hugh Segal, Doctor of Law LLD

[Hugh Segal]
Hugh Segal

Ceremony 15: Monday, June 4 at 10 am

Now the fifth elected Principal of Massey College and a strategic advisor at the law firm of Aird and Berlis, LLP, Hugh Segal has spent his career in such public service roles as the Associate Cabinet Secretary (Federal-Provincial Affairs) in Ontario and the Chief of Staff to the Prime Minister.  In Ontario, he was involved in the negotiations to patriate the Canadian constitution and create the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.  Mr. Segal chaired the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the Special Senate Committee on Anti-Terrorism between 2005 and 2014.  He served as Canada's Special Envoy to the Commonwealth and a member of the Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group on reform and modernization, human rights, and rule of law.

A former President of the Institute for Research on Public Policy in Montreal, a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Global Affairs, and a Distinguished Fellow of the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Queen's School of Policy Studies, and the Smith School of Business at Queen's, Mr. Segal holds honorary doctorates from the Royal Military College of Canada and the University of Ottawa.

Douglas Cardinal, Doctor of Law LLD

[Douglas Cardinal]
Douglas Cardinal

Ceremony 21: Wednesday, June 6 at 2:30 pm

Originally from Calgary, Alberta, Douglas Cardinal's architectural studies at The University of British Columbia took him to Austin, Texas, where he achieved his architectural degree and found his passion for human rights initiatives. Mr. Cardinal has become a forerunner of philosophies of sustainability, green buildings, and ecologically designed community planning.

Mr. Cardinal has received many national and international awards, including 20 Honorary Doctorates, Gold Medals of Architecture in Canada and Russia, and an award from the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for best sustainable village. He was also titled an Officer of the Order of Canada, one of the most prestigious awards that can be given to a Canadian, and he was awarded the declaration of “World Master of Contemporary Architecture” by the International Association of Architects.

Planning underway to welcome students for fall term

The 2017-18 academic year isn’t over quite yet, but Queen’s is already encouraging students, staff, faculty and the near-campus community to think ahead to the 2018 fall term.

[Move-In Day]
Move-in day for the 2018-19 academic year is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 1. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

The university is introducing several changes to the fall term schedule, including changes to residence move-in day and the first day of classes.

More than 4,500 students will be moving in to their residence on the Saturday of Labour Day weekend, Sept. 1, 2018, instead of the usual Sunday.

Thousands of upper-year students living in the near-campus community are also expected to arrive in town over that weekend. With so many people moving around the campus area on the Saturday, the impact on local traffic will be significant.

“We are working closely with our municipal community partners to plan for the increase in traffic on the Saturday, ensuring new students know what to do and where to go when they arrive, and making the community aware of changes to the first-week schedule,” says Ann Tierney, Vice Provost and Dean of Student Affairs. “Our goal is a smooth weekend for everyone, as we welcome our students to Queen’s and the Kingston community.”

The changes also include starting classes on the first Thursday in September and are the result of the introduction of a fall break into the academic calendar. Following the residence move-in day and welcome to campus on Saturday and Sunday, faculty-specific orientation activities will take place Monday, Sept. 3 through Wednesday, Sept. 5. Regular classes will run Thursday and Friday, and will be followed by continued faculty-specific and university orientation events throughout the weekend.  There are several varsity games and campus activities scheduled all week.

Advancing move-in by one day, and starting classes the following Thursday, retains six days of orientation activities, has minimal impact on sessional dates, offers a new four-day break in late October, during a high-stress period in the term, and maintains pre-exam study days in December.

Reducing the time between move-in and the start of classes is also consistent with the recommendations of a working group that reviewed undergraduate orientation and developed a shared vision for an inclusive and accessible welcome to Queen’s.

 “We will be communicating with our students, faculty, staff and the community over the summer to ensure they have accurate and timely information around the changes being introduced this September to move-in and orientation week,” Tierney adds.

Information for new students can be found at the Queen’s University Residences and Housing webpage.  This page will be updated throughout the summer. 

* An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that the fall term break would take place in Novermber. The fall term break will take place in late October.

Introducing our new faculty members: Ravi Prakash

Ravi Prakash is a new member of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science.

This profile is part of a series highlighting some of the new faculty members who have recently joined the Queen's community as part of the principal's faculty renewal plans, which will see 200 new faculty members hired over the next five years.

Ravi Prakash (Electrical and Computer Engineering) sat down with the Gazette to talk about his experience so far. Dr. Prakash is an assistant professor.

[Ravi Prakash]
Ravi Prakash is a new member of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. (Photo by Rob Whelan)
Fast Facts about Dr. Prakash

Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Hometown: Delhi, India

Alma mater: University of Calgary (Doctor of philosophy and master of science in electrical and computer engineering), IIT Madras (undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering)

Research area: Disposable sensors and micro-actuators, organic transistors, label-free biosensors, bio-engineering

Unwinds with: Tennis, squash, swimming, hiking, walking the dog

Dr. Prakash’s web bio
Why did you decide to teach?
My perspective has always been to solve a research challenge. I feel like I have always been a mentor, even during my undergraduate studies. I was engaged in activities where I could help students in junior years.
When I started my masters and had some teaching assistant responsibilities, I thoroughly enjoyed assisting undergraduates. Everyone has their calling, and it seemed like research and instruction is mine. I have enjoyed it so far – I must be doing something right.
What got you interested in electrical engineering?

I think what attracted me to engineering most was the eagerness to deliberate about real-world challenges, and growing up in resource-limited settings offered an excellent vantage point for that.

When I was doing my bachelor degree in mechanical engineering at IIT Madras, I opted for a minor degree in biomedical engineering and was looking to develop microsystems for biomedical applications. I realized there are more electronics to these systems than mechanics. I had a good background for the transition when it appeared the best possible department to continue research would be electrical and computer engineering.

In my past research, I have developed advanced chip technologies for conducting bio-assay and biochemical tests. If you think of any nucleic acid test, for example, you go to a clinical laboratory where they take a blood or other bio-fluid sample, and they do a host of clinical tests using expensive bench-top instruments to identify bacterial, viral, or other kinds of infections.

During my PhD and my NSERC postdoctoral fellowship, I designed molecular diagnostic microchips that did not require such large, expensive clinical equipment, allowing for potential low-cost and point-of-care applications.

[Ravi Prakash]
Dr. Prakash examines a polymer biosensor device. (Photo by Rob Whelan)
What do you hope to achieve in your research?

My research is more focused on physical and chemical sensors now, and less on biomedical devices.

I am looking to create disposable, flexible sensors and soft-wearable devices where a polymer patch on skin can detect analytes such as glucose level, lactate level, or levels of stress induced hormone cortisol for biomonitoring applications. Two of my current students are working on cortisol detection in sweat and saliva, and detection of different kinds of enzymes and antibodies using novel label-free organic biosensors, in collaboration with faculty members in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and the Kingston Health Sciences Centre.

There is a health management aspect to monitoring these bio-molecular concentration levels, but there are many devices already available to track glucose. What we are trying to do is offer a multitude of tests within the same device through smart, multi-modal sensor integration and implementing new data analytic tools. Let’s say you’re doing athletic conditioning – these devices could help monitor lactate, pyruvate, glucose levels, measure breathing rate, exhaled air composition and the like. Or we can monitor acute or chronic stress conditions in workplaces, such as the military or healthcare facilities, where chronic stress and associated conditions are a major concern.

I also have some tangential research interests in clean tech energy sources. We are developing bio-supercapacitors with a company in Ottawa which will use a sustainable bio-electrolyte product in small and large footprint energy storage systems. I have recently started working on a geophysical sensing project – which is more of a civil engineering and environmental engineering domain – but my interest is focused on enhancing near-field sensing methods for testing geomembrane integrity as part of my sensor research.

Are you teaching as well?

I have taught a few technical electives, such as sensors and actuators, and core courses in electronics and digital electronics. This fall, I believe I will be teaching graduate courses in biological signal analysis.

This term, I had a large class with about 270 students, which can be a bit overwhelming administratively. But I love being in the classroom, and I enjoy being in front of the avid learners at Queen’s who are both intelligent and willing.

[A photosensitive chip]
Flexible organic transistors like these are sensitive to the environment and must be handled with care. (Photo by Rob Whelan)
What are you most proud of?
I completed my undergraduate degree at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras. IITs are world-renowned institutions and, if you have some idea of the population of India, you know the competition to get in is really rigorous. I believe we had about two million students take exams per batch. Only a handful – less than 2,500 – are selected. I was ranked around 700th nationwide.
I am also proud of some of the research I led during my PhD. We were developing some superhydrophobic coating for new lab-on-chip tests and other biological assays. At the time, creating such coatings was rather expensive. I connected with a research team in Athens, Greece and worked with them on optimizing a relatively low-cost technique. We ended up coming up with a very novel way of developing superhydrophobic coatings. 
Doing a successful, interdisciplinary project where I was heavily involved gave me a lot of confidence. I was able to combine my various experiences into fruitful research outcomes.
Since that time, I have formed new research collaborations in Greece, as well as some in the U.S. and Germany. I have exceptional collaborations across Canada, particularly in Ontario.
[Ravi Prakash]
Dr. Prakash sits on the steps outside of his lab in Walter Light Hall. (Photo by Rob Whelan)
How are you liking Kingston?
I love Kingston. There is so much history in this town…and I call it a town. It’s not really a city, is it? Coming from Calgary at least, it seems like a town…but there is so much culture and history here.
I love the Victorian architecture, the limestone buildings and the gorgeous waterfront. I miss hiking though, being in Calgary and near the Rockies, but I am planning to head to Québec City at some point this summer to get some hiking in. 
I liked the weather in Kingston last year. This year, not so much.
It’s still a transition as my wife transitions her work from Calgary to Kingston – when you leave a city where you have been for eight years, it takes time!
Other than hiking, any hobbies or interests?
I love swimming. I haven’t made it to the beach yet but I look forward to checking that off my list.
I enjoy racket sports – tennis outdoors, squash indoors. I also have a 11-month old black Labrador retriever which means a lot of training, walking, and other outdoor activities.

Faculty Renewal

Principal Daniel Woolf has identified faculty renewal as a high priority for reinvestment by the university in support of the academic mission. The five-year renewal plan will see 200 new faculty hired, which nearly doubles the hiring pace of the past six years.

Faculty renewal supports Queen’s commitment to diversity and inclusion by giving the university the opportunity to seek, proactively, representation from equity-seeking groups such as women, people with disabilities, Indigenous Peoples, and racialized individuals. It will also build on Queen’s current areas of research strength.

To learn more about the Principal’s faculty renewal plans, read this Gazette article. Stay tuned for additional new faculty profiles in the Gazette.

Library journal input sought

Queen’s University Library is asking all Queen’s researchers to review and comment on the Queen’s results of the national Journal Usage Project to provide further input about which journals are most highly valued at Queen’s.

For more information, please see the Information Resources Strategies on the Queen’s University Library website. 

April 17 edition of the Gazette now available

Queen's gazette - April 17, 2018
Read the online version of the Gazette.

The April 17 edition of the Gazette is now available and can be picked up around Queen’s campus.

This latest edition of the Gazette is filled with interesting Queen’s-focused items including:

  • An article and photo collection on the announcement of a $5-million gift from the Côté Sharp Family Foundation to help create a new centralized wellness centre
  • The announcements of two new vice-principals (Advancement, Research) and a new vice-provost and dean of the School of Graduate Studies
  • A feature article highlighting the excitement surrounding the Ask an Astronaut: Educational Downlink event
  • ​Updates on the latest research, awards and achievements of faculty, staff and students.

The next edition of the Gazette will be published May 15, 2018. However, new articles are posted daily at the Gazette Online.

Follow us on Twitter at @queensuGazette.

Anyone looking to get a story, photo or information in the Gazette can contact the paper's editor Andrew Carroll.

Call for nominations: 2018 Distinguished Service Awards

As a reminder, Queen’s faculty, staff, students, and retirees are invited to nominate candidates for a Queen’s Distinguished Service Award. Inaugurated by the University Council in 1974, this award recognizes individuals who have made the university a better place through their extraordinary contributions.

Recipients will be recognized at the University Council Annual Dinner on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.

Guidelines, the updated nomination form, and additional information are available at http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/university-council/distinguished-service-awards.

Please submit nominations to the University Council Executive Committee, care of the University Secretariat, by Friday, April 27, at 4 pm. 

Please contact the University Secretariat at ucouncil@queensu.ca or 613-533-6095 if you have questions about the Distinguished Service Award or the nomination process.  

One year later

Principal Daniel Woolf reflects on the year that has gone by since the publication of the Principal's Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusion final report, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission task force final report.

[Principal Daniel Woolf and Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) hold a wampum belt]
Principal Daniel Woolf and Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) hold a wampum belt at a special Senate meeting to mark the 175th anniversary. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

Just over a year ago, the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity and Inclusion (PICRDI) and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Task Force presented their final reports about how to make Queen’s a more inclusive, diverse and welcoming institution, and one that also values and reflects Indigenous histories and perspectives. Since then, many people across the institution have been working towards these goals and I’m pleased with the progress we have made so far.

This week, we released the one-year implementation reports for PICRDI and TRC and in the reports you will find very extensive updates on all of the initiatives and projects that have taken place. This first year has focused on building the foundation we need to guide long-term, sustainable change. Most notably, this includes expanding Deputy Provost Teri Shearer’s profile to cover our diversity and inclusion portfolio, establishing the University Council on Anti-Racism and Equity (UCARE), instituting the Office of Indigenous Initiatives and appointing Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) as the first Director of Indigenous Initiatives, as well as having all areas of the university develop and implement their own plans for addressing the TRC and PICRDI recommendations.

Read the Annual Reports
PICRDI
TRC

We need to continue the dialogue that has begun with all members of the community. The long-term change we are striving for will only happen when everyone—students, faculty, staff, and the broader community— is both committed to and engaged in the process, and understands that being a diverse, inclusive and welcoming institution enhances our academic mission, our student experience and our research. We will be a stronger, better Queen’s for doing this work. 

There is a saying, “Nothing worth having comes easy.” Certainly we believe that having a diverse, inclusive and welcoming institution is not just worth having, but something we must have. To get there takes a lot of hard work, and we’ve seen a tremendous effort over the past year.

However, I want to emphasize that we will not consider our work to be complete once we have ‘checked all the boxes’ on the lists of recommendations. We must continue to prioritize and work towards these ideals. New ideas and initiatives will also emerge and be championed from every corner of the university. I encourage you to read the implementation reports to get a better understanding of what we have collectively accomplished.

I thank everyone who has contributed to these initiatives over the past year and those who continue to lead the charge. I look forward to ‘year two’, using the momentum we have built to create positive change at Queen’s.  

  • [Various diversity, inclusion, and reconciliation leaders on campus]
    A number of new positions were created and new people were hired over the past year to foster diversity and inclusivity on campus. From L-R, front to back: Bezhig Waabshke Ma'iingan Gewetiigaabo (Deborah St Amant), Vanessa Yzaguirre, Stephanie Simpson, Mona Rahman, Erin Clow, Teri Shearer, Klodiana Kolomitro, Lavie Williams, (Thohahoken) Michael Doxtater, and Alana Butler. (University Communications)
  • [Members of the University Council on Anti-Racism and Equity (UCARE)]
    In the fall, the university formed the University Council on Anti-Racism and Equity (UCARE) to promote and support the efforts of the university to foster a more diverse and inclusive campus community. (University Communications)
  • [Principal Daniel Woolf and Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) pose with the Queen's Remembers plinth dedicated to Indigenous Peoples]
    Principal Daniel Woolf and Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) pose with the Queen's Remembers plinth dedicated to Indigenous Peoples. It was unveiled in the fall as the first in a series of "Queen's Remembers" plinths located across campus. (University Communications)
  • [Jill Christie, Patty Hajdu, Heidi Penning]
    Jill Christie (left) and Heidi Penning (right) of the Queen's Equity and Human Rights Office accept an award from the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour for an equity tool and framework their office developed. (Supplied Photo)
  • [TRC one-year anniversary event - circle]
    Members of the Queen’s community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the anniversary of the release of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

Foghlaim Gaeilge at the Irish Language Weekend

Ever wonder where the lyrics of the Queen's Oil Thigh song come from, or what they mean? The last weekend of April features a crash course in Irish language, dancing, and music.

[Ruth Wehlau (English Language and Literature)]
Ruth Wehlau (English Language and Literature) continues two decades of Irish language teaching in Kingston, connecting the Queen’s community to Irish culture.

The Irish Language Weekend is an opportunity for the Queen’s community to dive into the Celtic language and culture that has a long history at the university. Newcomers can dabble in Irish phrases and experienced speakers can stretch out their vocabulary in an immersive environment.

The weekend includes classes (in four levels from beginner to advanced), meals, workshops on music and dancing, lectures, and a ceili (dance).

Ruth Wehlau (English Language and Literature), the lead organizer for the event, has a passion for teaching Irish and wants to spread the word on the yearly event, now in its 21st year.

“Kingston has a big hidden Irish history, and a very active Irish community,” says Dr. Wehlau. “It’s a nice feeling to connect with this language and community that isn’t gone, despite the previous years of colonization of Ireland that has endangered the language.”

The Harp of Tara society has shared Irish language and culture through annual workshops for over two decades in Kingston. Queen’s is hosting the immersion weekend this year from Dé hAoine (Friday), April 27 to Dé Domhnaigh (Sunday), April 29.

“Any time that you learn a new language, you’re learning a new way to experience the world,” says Dr. Wehlau. “The Irish language has lots of proverbs, curses, and interesting turns of phases that are less cut and dry than English.”

Irish, also known as Gaelic or Irish Gaelic, is one of four surviving Celtic languages still spoken around the world.

“The spelling is different from English, but it follows rules,” says Dr. Wehlau. “Celtic languages are famous, or notorious, for initial sound changes. This can be a challenge if you’re listening for cues and the beginning of a word doesn’t sound the same, but it’s actually natural to change certain words when speaking. For example, if I want to say that I live in Kingston, I have to change the K to a G, and say 'í gKingston'. The sound changes are embedded in the language. It really isn’t like English, but I think that’s part of the appeal.”

The weekend costs $165 for the full package or $70 for a student one day (Saturday) pass.

To learn more about the weekend or to purchase your ticket, contact Dr. Wehlau at wehlaur@queensu.ca or visit the Harp of Tara website.

Policy Studies Implementation and Transition Working Group holds first meetings

The Policy Studies Implementation and Transition Working Group has begun to meet in early April and will meet weekly over the coming months.

This working group was created following a recommendation of the Principal’s Commission on the future of Public Policy at Queen’s University, which submitted its final report, An Ambitious Vision for Public Policy at Queen’sin February.

This report outlines the need for a ‘next generation’ of university-based public policy research and education with a focus on education, inter-disciplinary collaboration, and incorporating public policy as a pan-university priority.

The working group, which includes representatives from across the university, is tasked with considering each of the recommendations in the Principal’s Commission report, consulting with stakeholders, working out the specifics of the future and function of the group, and assisting with the transition and implementation of change. 

The members of the working group hope to have a preliminary report ready before the summer. 

Learn more about the report, Principal’s Commission, and working group on the Principal’s website.

Members of the Working Group include:

Barbara Crow (Co-Chair) Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
David Walker (Co-Chair) Interim Executive Director, School of Policy Studies
Jacquie Jamieson (Secretary) Executive Assistant to the Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
Keith Banting Queen's Research Chair in Public Policy; Fellow, Royal Society of Canada (RSC)
Pascale Champagne Professor, Canada Research Chair in Bioresources Engineering, Director of Beaty Water Research Center
Peter Chin Associate Dean, Undergraduate Studies, Faculty of Education
David Detomasi Associate Professor, Distinguished Faculty Fellow of International Business, Smith School of Business
Carly Ellis Master of Public Administration Student
Lynn Freeman Associate Director, Administration and Finance, School of Policy Studies
Michael Green Head Family Medicine, Head CHSPR
Anne Johnson Assistant Professor, Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining
Warren Mabee Associate Professor of Geography; Canada Research Chair in Renewable Energy Development and Implementation; Director, Queen's Institute for Energy and Environmental Policy (QIEEP)
Grégoire Webber Canada Research Chair in Public Law and Philosophy of Law
Awet Weldemichael Associate Professor and Queen's National Scholar, Department of History
Benoit-Antoine Bacon (Ex-Officio) Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)
Kathy O'Brien (Ex-Officio) Associate Vice-Principal (International)
 

Remembering the neutrino

Nobel Prize-winning science was celebrated at a special event. 

  • [Photo of John Fisher, Daniel Woolf, George Ewan, Art McDonald, and Jan Allen]
    VIPs pose with the Nobel medal display at the Agnes. L-R: Marc Dignam, Head of the Physics Department; John Fisher, Interim VP (Research); Daniel Woolf, Principal; George Ewan, Professor Emeritus; Art McDonald, Nobel laureate; and Jan Allen, Director of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Nobel Medal Replica]
    A replica of the Nobel Prize medal won by Art McDonald is now permanently on display at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Past and present Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) employees and their family members]
    Proving that research is a team effort, past and present Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) employees and their family members gather around the plinth. (University Communications)
  • [Janet McDonald and other attendees]
    Janet McDonald (foreground), wife of Art McDonald, and other spectators flip through the plinth's pages. (University Communications)
  • [George Ewan, Art McDonald, and Daniel Woolf]
    George Ewan, Art McDonald, and Daniel Woolf pose with chocolates resembling the three 'flavours' of neutrinos. (University Communications)

On Monday, representatives from across the Queen’s community gathered to celebrate two new installations that will commemorate the Nobel Prize-winning research discoveries of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) scientific collaboration led by Dr. Art McDonald, Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics Emeritus in the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy at Queen’s.

Dr. McDonald was the co-recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for his discovery of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon which proved that neutrinos have mass. He shared the prize with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, whose research made similar detections possible.

Neutrinos, which are sometimes referred to as the ‘building blocks of the universe’, are tiny subatomic particles with almost no mass and no charge. The SNO Collaboration’s discovery increased human understanding of these particles, which ultimately helps scientists understand how stars, galaxies, and the universe itself has evolved since the Big Bang.

To celebrate the discovery, the university has unveiled a monument between Ontario Hall and Grant Hall to share the fascinating story of the neutrino breakthrough with visitors to campus. This plinth is part of the Queen’s Remembers series, an initiative that commemorates those who have made significant and noteworthy contributions to Queen's University.

“Queen’s University has been wonderfully supportive of the SNO research work and continues to support strongly the ongoing work at the SNOLAB underground laboratory,” says Dr. McDonald. “Those of us who have worked on SNO are very appreciative of this commemoration of the important contributions of many Queen’s students, post-doctoral fellows, staff, and faculty that led to this scientific success.”

Additionally, a replica of Dr. McDonald’s Nobel Prize medal will be permanently displayed at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. The display will be located in a busy hallway between the gallery and Etherington House, and will include details about the experiment.

“The research conducted by the incredible team at SNO, under the leadership of Dr. Art McDonald, has an impact that goes far beyond Queen’s University,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “The vision of those who started the collaboration, including Dr. George Ewan, Professor Emeritus of the Physics Department at Queen’s, and the late Dr. Herb Chen, and the dedication of all who have worked on it since, have helped Canada become a leader in the field of particle astrophysics. We are delighted to recognize and celebrate their achievement with these two inspirational displays.”

Previous Queen’s Remembers plinths have recognized the traditional inhabitants of the Kingston area—the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples—and the 5th Field Company, a group of soldiers primarily comprised of Queen’s students and faculty who served and gave their lives in both World Wars. To learn more about the Queen’s Remembers initiative, visit the Queen’s Encyclopedia.

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