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For the Record - Sept. 1

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette editor Andrew Carroll.

Abridged Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Keith Pilkey’s term as Head of the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering is scheduled to end on Dec. 31, 2022. Dr. Pilkey is willing to consider reappointment.

In accordance with the terms of Article 41 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, an abridged Selection Committee has been struck to assist the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) in the selection of the next Head. Under the rules of the Collective Agreement, members of the Bargaining Unit within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering have elected the following people to the committee:

  • Laurent Béland, Assistant Professor
  • Michael Rainbow, Associate Professor
  • Heidi-Lynn Ploeg, Professor
  • Mark Daymond, Professor
  • Qingguo Li, Associate Professor

The committee will be chaired by the Vice-Dean (Research) of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Amir Fam.

Under Article 41.3.3, if the Head indicates that they want to be renewed, “the abridged Selection Committee shall consult with the members of the Department, and if it concludes that there is a clear departmental consensus in favour of renewal, it shall recommend to the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) that the Head be renewed.” If the Committee concludes that there is no clear consensus for renewal, a full committee shall then be constituted.

To assist in this consultation process, you are invited to express your views on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and whether you favour renewal of the present Head. If you wish to offer comments on these matters, please be advised that your letter will be reviewed by the Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making. Please send all comments to the attention of Jacqueline Hill by Friday, Sept. 30, 2022.

A warm welcome back to campus

The 2022-23 academic year starts with students returning to campus for the first day of classes. 

  • Students walk along University Avenue on the first day of classes for the 2022-23 academic year.
    Students walk along University Avenue on the first day of classes for the 2022-23 academic year.
  • New Queen's students learn the Oil Thigh.
    New Queen's students learn the Oil Thigh.
  • Principal Patrick Deane welcomes the incoming students to Queen's.
    Principal Patrick Deane welcomes the incoming students to Queen's.
  • Queen's Bands members march into Richardson Stadium during the welcome event on Sunday.
    Queen's Bands members march into Richardson Stadium during the welcome event on Sunday.
  • Newly-arriving students moved into residence on Saturday, Sept. 3.
    Newly-arriving students moved into residence on Saturday, Sept. 3.
  • Many volunteers helped out on Move-In Day.
    Many volunteers helped out on Move-In Day.
  • A mom, and alumna, hugs her son after helping him move in to residence.
    A mom, and alumna, hugs her son after helping him move in to residence.
  • Approximately 4,600 students have moved into the university's 17 residences.
    Approximately 4,600 students have moved into the university's 17 residences.

Queen’s students have returned to campus, with the university hosting the first day of classes for the 2022-23 academic year of Tuesday, Sept. 6.

The welcome back started on Saturday, Sept. 3 with 4,600 students moving into the university’s 17 residence buildings. Each residence is operating at full occupancy, following two years of reduced capacities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The welcome continued as newly-arrived students took part in orientation with special events designed to welcome them into the Queen’s and Kingston communities being hosted on Saturday evening, as well as Sunday and Monday. Events continue throughout the week and will conclude on Sunday, Sept. 11.

The orientation schedule is available online.

New students set to join Queen’s and Kingston communities

​Fall orientation events are designed to help new arrivals make connections and find resources.

​Fall orientation events are designed to help new arrivals make connections and find resources.

As new students continue to arrive in Kingston and on campus this week, and with Residence Move-In day on Saturday, Sept. 3, Queen’s is marking a return to in-person orientation activities for the first time since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The university has been working closely with student groups to create a wide range of fun, informative and responsible welcome events, that began with the Queen’s University International Centre’s Welcome Week (Aug. 29-Sept. 2), and the School of Graduate Studies and Post-doctoral Fellows’ Graduate Resource Fair (Sept 1).

The majority of first-year orientation events are scheduled for the weekends of Sept. 3-5 and Sept. 9-11. Each event is an opportunity to build friendships with peers and connections with upper-year students, some that last a lifetime.

“We are very excited to welcome the Class of 2026 to Queen’s and Kingston but also to be back in person,” says Meg Ferriman, Director, Student Life in Student Affairs. “Orientation is a great opportunity to connect our incoming students with the Queen’s and Kingston communities, and to highlight the services and supports available and the student experience that Queen’s is well known for.”

Following Residence Move-In, first-year students – including first-years living off-campus – will take part in a series of events as part of University Orientation, welcoming them into the Queen’s community while also providing the tools and resources to help promote their success at university.

Later at Welcome Home Night, new arrivals can take part in tricolour crafts, snacks, sports, and watch a movie. There will also be opportunities to meet upper-year leaders and get a campus tour.

On Sunday, Sept. 4 the Tricolour Parade and Welcome, a new event, will see students parade to Richardson Stadium. Once there, they will hear from student leaders and Principal Patrick Deane, enjoy a picnic lunch, and learn such Queen’s standards as the Oil Thigh and how to cheer ‘Cha Gheill!’.

On Monday, Sept. 5, Labour Day, Faculty Orientation begins, with students participating in faculty and program events – Arts and Science, Smith School of Business, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Health Sciences, along with the School of Computing, School of Nursing, School of Kinesiology, as well as New, Exchange, Worldly, and Transfer Students (NEWTS). Further details, including schedules, are available online.

Classes then begin on Tuesday, Sept. 6.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, there are campus walks starting at 5:30 p.m., and the Yellow House, Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC), and Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre, will host Meet and Mingles for equity-deserving students.

On Thursday, Sept. 8, all students are invited to the Tricolour Open House, starting at 5 p.m. in the ARC. This event is a chance for new and returning students to learn about the wide selection of clubs and campus resources.

Faculty Orientation continues on Sept. 9-11 with featured events including a special concert hosted by the Alma Mater Society (AMS) on Friday night and the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS) Sidewalk Sale on Saturday. This well-attended event introduces students to local businesses and on-campus units and will support the Kingston chapter of the Canadian Cancer Society.

Queen’s is committed to supporting students as they integrate into the Kingston community as well, promoting good citizenship, safety, respect and responsibility. Other messages being shared include information on alcohol harm reduction and sexual violence prevention and response.

Queen’s students contribute to the local community through volunteering with organizations and helping the Kingston economy.  A recent report by Deloitte shows that students spend approximately $237 million in Kingston every year while another $1 million is raised annually by students, staff, and faculty to support local causes.

Before arriving at Queen’s, first-year students were able to get an early start through First-Year Foundation, an online, self-directed program to help prepare them for new academic expectations, introduce services and resources supporting academic success, outline important dates and deadlines, navigate administrative processes including financial accounts, and introduce them to onQ – Queen’s dedicated online learning management system. As well, more than 2,000 first-year students and guests attended Summer Orientation to Academics and Resources on campus in July.

For more information visit the Student Experience Office website.

Queen’s remembers Margaret Light

The Queen’s community is remembering alumna Margaret Light (Arts'47) as a passionate arts supporter who helped the next generation of Queen’s-trained art conservationists better preserve and restore textiles, paintings, and sculptures.   

Light passed away peacefully at home at the age of 95 on Aug. 12.

“Margaret Light was a proud Queen’s supporter who, through her boundless energy and dedication, inspired our faculty and students,” says Norman Vorano, head of the Department of Art History and Art Conservation at Queen’s. “She felt very passionately about the need to preserve important cultural and artistic objects so that future generations may continue to have transformative experiences with art. Her generosity has touched so many of our students.”  

Light – the widow of Walter Light, former Queen’s Board of Trustees chair and namesake of Walter Light Hall – had an abiding passion for textiles and textile art. 

She was very involved in the Museum of Textiles in Toronto, collected an array of carpets and rugs, and owned her own weaving looms. She was a dedicated supporter of an art form that has finally gained wider acceptance in the world of high art, which has traditionally been the domain of paintings and sculpture and less accepting of the complex artistic merits of textiles. 

Light’s own interest focused on the art conservation program at Queen’s. 

Light donated nearly $1.8 million to Queen’s, $1 million of which went to establish the Margaret A. Light Fellowship in Art Conservation, which brings in leading conservators from around the world to offer their insights to the school. The fellowship also supports teaching and research activities in the art conservation program, including, in addition to teaching fellows, visiting scholars, guest lecturers, workshops, equipment for teaching and research, faculty research, and sabbatical replacements. 

Light also supported the purchase of a digital X-ray scanner which is making an enormous contribution to the art conservation program and expanding knowledge about the preservation of the art works and the means by which such pieces are made. The new scanner has enabled research that would otherwise not be possible.

The X-ray scanner is a fundamental piece of equipment that students in the program use to examine underlying structures in objects. Being able to see ‘inside’ the work’ actually allows students the chance to perform research that is necessary to keep up an evolving discipline.  

New HR Learning Catalogue launches Sept. 1

New virtual and in-person training and development opportunities for Queen’s staff and faculty begins this fall, with registration starting Sept. 1.

Queen’s staff and faculty will once again have the opportunity to learn new skills and understand different perspectives with the launch of the 2022-2023 HR Learning Catalogue. The Organizational Development and Learning (OD&L) team is pleased to offer many in-person and virtual classes this fall term, as well as hybrid classes planned for the winter  term. With more than 80 offerings, including certificate programs and individual workshops covering topics like Presentation Skills, Advanced Customer Service and Project Management, you will be sure to find learning that helps you grow your career at Queen’s.

A reminder that workshops are open to all employees including managers, staff, faculty, contract, casuals, and postdoctoral fellows.

New programming for the 2022-2023 year includes:

  • Advanced Foundations for Project Management
  • Data Proficiency Certificate offered by ITServices to help revolutionize the way you work with data, Power Query and Power BI.
  • Managing Burnout Certificate for Managers (available in early 2023)

Other changes to improve programming are in the works. Detailed information about workshops will include updated learning outcomes and connections to Queen’s competencies to help staff and their managers better choose classes that fit their individual development needs. Regularly offered programs such as the Certificate in International Perspectives (CIP) and Queen’s Volunteer Engagement Certificate (QVEC) will be taken off the roster this year to ensure all offerings remain current and aligned with Queen’s Strategy. Fitness classes normally offered through the Learning Catalogue will now be administered jointly by ARC staff and our Employee Wellness teams to better serve employees.  More information about fitness and other wellness programs is available on the HR Intranet.

The OD&L team encourages all managers to familiarize themselves with the workshops available to both them and their team members. Managers play a key role in supporting ongoing learning and development for employees, something that is critical to the Queen’s Strategy.

If you are an employee or manager seeking guidance on workshops or development opportunities, please connect with the OD&L team.

More than 3,700 employees joined the Learning Catalogue programming last year, with 96 employees successfully graduating this August with one of many Learning Catalogue certificates. Visit the HR Intranet to learn more and explore all offerings.

Vice-Provost (International) term extended

Sandra den OtterPrincipal Patrick Deane and Provost Teri Shearer are pleased to announce that Sandra den Otter’s appointment as Vice-Provost (International) has been extended to June 30, 2024.

Throughout her tenure as Vice-Provost (International), Dr. den Otter has advanced Queen’s international strategic priorities and is currently leading the development of the university’s new global engagement strategy. Dr. den Otter also played a leading role in managing the university’s international partnerships throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and worked with colleagues across the university and with government stakeholders to ensure international students could safely travel to Kingston to continue their studies. 

As Vice-Provost (International), Dr. den Otter will continue to work closely with Principal Deane, Provost Shearer, and other members of Queen’s leadership team to implement a strategy to enhance Queen's positive global impact in teaching and learning, and research and discovery. The strategy will focus on equitable global partnerships and equity, diversity, and inclusion more broadly – identifying how global engagement can help Queen's create an environment where everyone can thrive.

Dr. den Otter’s research focuses on the history of Britain and the world in the 18th to 20th centuries, with particular expertise in the history of ideas of social welfare and inequality, and colonial law and cultures. Following doctoral studies in the Faculty of Modern History at the University of Oxford, Dr. den Otter held a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University. She has also held a research fellowship at Clare Hall, Cambridge. She is the co-editor of the Journal of British Studies (Cambridge University Press), the premier journal for scholars of British history in North America.

Opening the doors to Queen’s new residence

  • Front foyer
    Front foyer
  • One of the 334 student rooms
    One of the 334 student rooms
  • Indigenous Gathering Space
    Indigenous Gathering Space
  • Two-row wampum bench
    Two-row wampum bench
  • Indigenous Gathering Space
    Indigenous Gathering Space
  • Shared study space
    Shared study space
  • Common room
    Common room
  • Common room with kitchenette and laundry.
    Common room with kitchenette and laundry.
  • Main entrance
    Main entrance
  • Two houses were incorporated into the residence.
    Two houses were incorporated into the residence.
  • Two houses were incorporated into the residence.
    Two houses were incorporated into the residence.

Queen’s University hosted an open house for its newest residence, welcoming Queen’s and Kingston community members to tour the five-story building located at 156 Albert St.

Faculty, staff, neighbours, and even some incoming students, toured the residence which includes 334 fully-equipped rooms featuring semi-private washrooms, along with shared study rooms, laundry facilities, and kitchenettes on each floor. Designed with accessibility at the forefront, the residence also features several private and semi-private accessible suites, wheelchair accessible entrances, and is fully serviced by elevators and stairs. It has also achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, contributing strength to the university’s overall sustainability efforts.

Other unique new elements include a prayer space, indoor bicycle storage, a service animal washing station, as well as a new Indigenous gathering space.

The residence will be home for more than 320 new undergraduates and 10 dons, who will move in on Saturday, Sept. 3.

The residence was built by Graham Construction and designed by Diamond Schmitt from Toronto in partnership with local firm Shoalts and Zaback Architects Ltd.

Creating opportunities for newcomers

The Career Gateway Program removes barriers to employment for newcomers, teaches important workplace skills, and helps participants navigate Canadian culture.

  • Amal Mohamed is congratulated by Karen Burkett, Director, Queen’s School of English and Justine Macdonald, Instructor, Queen’s Career Gateway Program.
    Amal Mohamed is congratulated by Karen Burkett, Director, Queen’s School of English and Justine Macdonald, Instructor, Queen’s Career Gateway Program.
  • Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) congratulates the participants of the Career Gateway Program.
    Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) congratulates the participants of the Career Gateway Program.
  • Akelat Kebede is congratulated by Karen Burkett, Director, Queen’s School of English and Justine Macdonald, Instructor, Queen’s Career Gateway Program.
    Akelat Kebede is congratulated by Karen Burkett, Director, Queen’s School of English and Justine Macdonald, Instructor, Queen’s Career Gateway Program.
  • Dean of the Faculty of Education Rebecca Luce-Kapler speaks during the celebration event.
    Dean of the Faculty of Education Rebecca Luce-Kapler speaks during the celebration event.

Adapting to a new culture, learning the language, and finding employment can be a challenging task, but a new program at Queen’s University is helping guide newcomers as they adjust to life in Kingston.

The Career Gateway Program creates employment pathways and on-the-job learning opportunities at Queen’s for vulnerable persons within the community, such as refugees and individuals belonging to equity-deserving groups with limited English-language skills.

Learning new skills

Participants develop in-demand skills as casual members of the Custodial Support Services team, positioning them as possible candidates for future employment opportunities. By removing barriers to employment for vulnerable persons who may not have educational credentials, the program provides participants with the tools to be successful in today’s job market and grow connections within the community.

The Career Gateway Program takes place over approximately 12 months where participants complete three training modules: Skills Development and Training, Working in Teams, and Career Goal-Setting.

The program recently celebrated the completion of the first year of a three-year pilot and the accomplishments of the first cohort of participants.  Most of the participants have found continuing employment at the university.

The program includes paid release time from work to attend language training, focusing on language for the workplace, and related content to support their success in their position at Queen’s.

“Many English programs require second-language speakers to attend classes during the working hours of the day – forcing some to make a choice between improving their English and supporting their family, but the Career Gateway Program is a way for these participants to do both,” says Justine MacDonald, the instructor for the Career Gateway Program “We were able to create a safe and supportive space where the participants could share their challenges, clarify questions, and practice their English skills.” 

The skills also help with life outside of employment at the university by removing cultural barriers and introducing new concepts such as organizational structures, seniority, and benefits.  

“The Custodial Support Services unit of the Facilities Department embraced the opportunity to pilot the Career Gateway Program as an inspiring initiative to provide employment for newcomers to Canada and to further our efforts to diversify our team of custodial professionals,” says Samuel Whyte, Director, Facilities Operations and Maintenance. “Imagined as a gateway to future employment pathways, participants are encouraged to dream big.”

Community collaboration

The program is being sponsored by the Office of the Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration), and is a collaboration between Facilities, the School of English, Human Resources, Human Rights and Equity Office, ReStart Employment Services Kingston, and Immigrant Services Kingston and Area (ISKA).  

 The Career Gateway Program is also aligned with the university’s Strategic Goal #5: Embedding Queen’s in the community and aims to increase the university’s social impact by strengthening its local partnerships within the community. By connecting with local partners like ReStart and ISKA, the Career Gateway Program plays an important role in strengthening supports for newcomers and contributing to a welcoming, diverse, and inclusive community.

“I recently applied for a new position at the university, and I got it,” says Luis Herrera, one of the inaugural participants. “If you were wondering if the Career Gateway Program works, let me tell you that it does as it gave me the courage and confidence to apply.”

Learn more about the Career Gateway Program on the Office of the Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) website.

Queen’s set to open its newest student residence

Albert Street Residence
Queen’s newest student residence, located at 156 Albert St., is focused on sustainability and providing modern and inclusive amenities. (Queen's University)

Doors to Queen’s University’s brand-new residence will soon be open, welcoming its inaugural group of first-year students to their new homes for the next eight months.

On Saturday, Sept. 3, more than 320 new undergraduates and 10 dons will move in to the recently completed building located at 156 Albert St. — a five-story structure with a unique design, modern amenities, and leading sustainability features.

“Our newest residence is a wonderful addition to campus, and we look forward to students having opportunities to enjoy its new spaces and amenities,” says Ann Tierney, Deputy Provost and Dean of Student Affairs. “Not only has it achieved high standards for energy efficiency and sustainable design, it has also incorporated inclusive, accessible spaces in which everyone can live, learn, and enjoy their time at Queen’s.”

Welcoming and inclusive

The building contains 334 fully-equipped rooms featuring semi-private washrooms, along with shared study rooms on each floor, laundry facilities, and kitchenettes. The carpet-free structure also has several private and semi-private accessible suites, wheelchair accessible entrances, and is fully serviced by elevators and stairs.

The residence also has some unique new elements, including nap pods, a prayer space, indoor bicycle storage, and even a service animal washing station. Outside in the courtyard, residents and the campus community will also be able to enjoy a new Indigenous gathering space — the newest of several Indigenous spaces across campus.

Albert Street Residence
The Albert Street Residence — which integrates two of the original five houses from the site into its design to maintain the look and feel of the surrounding community — has also achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, contributing to the university’s overall sustainability efforts. (Queen's University)

Sustainable design

The building — which integrated two of the original five houses from the site into its design to maintain the look and feel of the surrounding community — has also achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, contributing to the university’s overall sustainability efforts.

“We are focused on providing modern, sustainable facilities as we invest for the future,” says Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “As a LEED Gold-level certified building, the Albert Street project represents a significant investment into sustainable student housing capacity in the Kingston area. As we retrofit and renovate our older student housing, we will continue to set a high bar for our facilities to ensure we minimize our impact on the environment and meet our latest sustainability targets.”

The Albert Street residence is similar in size to the last two residences that were built at Queen’s; Both David C. Smith House and Brant House opened in 2015.

This new residence has freed up other residence rooms across campus, allowing renovations to begin. Queen’s will move immediately to renovate the 90-room residence located within the John Deutsch University Centre (JDUC), along with other major elements of the JDUC building, with work set to reach completion in summer 2024.

Members of the Queen’s and Kingston communities will have a chance to tour the new residence on Tuesday, Aug. 30 from Noon – 3 pm for an open house. An official name for the Albert Street building has yet to be selected. Once that process occurs, a formal naming ceremony will be held.

COVID-19 guidelines ahead of Fall term start

Masking

In line with current provincial and public health guidance, the university’s suspension of mandatory masking continues across campus at this time, however members of the Queen’s community are still strongly encouraged to wear a medical grade mask in indoor spaces where physical distancing cannot be maintained.

Queen’s University is a mask-friendly campus, and we ask that our community be considerate and respectful of one another’s decisions regarding masking. Individuals who enter private offices or other confined spaces where face to face interaction is required may be asked to wear a mask as a condition of entry. Some activities and roles may have mandatory requirements for masking, such as those in health clinics, hospitals, some laboratories, and in some organizations where students complete their placements.

The status of the university’s mask mandate Is subject to change at any time based on Public Health guidance. Medical grade masks continue to be available across campus for those who need them.

COVID-19 Vaccination requirements

At this time, proof of vaccination is not required to attend most in-person university activities or to live in Queen’s residence. However, we continue to strongly encourage all Queen’s students, staff, and faculty to stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters.

Students, faculty, and staff in the Faculty of Healthy Sciences accessing hospital or other external facilities are required to adhere to the guidelines, policies, and procedures of the institution which they are attending. As well, activities that involve any other third parties (such as health clinics, elementary and secondary schools, and other organizations where Queen’s students complete experiential learning placements) will continue to be subject to the COVID-19 safety requirements of those third parties, including any proof of vaccination requirements.  Students, staff, and faculty are advised to contact their respective Faculty for further details.

The university may reinstate its Policy Regarding Mandatory Vaccination Requirements for In-person University Activities, possibly on short notice, if the local public health environment changes, or, if government mandates or public health recommendations restore proof of vaccination requirements.

If the university does reinstate its policy, all students, faculty, staff, and others who cannot provide satisfactory proof of vaccination, based on the definition of “fully vaccinated” in place at that time, could find their in-person university activities restricted or discontinued. This could impede students’ ability to remain in their classes or in residence. It could also impact employment status for faculty and staff and the permitted activities of university contractors and visitors.

The university strongly recommends that every person intending to live, work or study on campus, or otherwise engage in in-person university activities, maintain up to date vaccinations and boosters to reduce the risk of an interruption to their studies, work or access to university facilities and resources.

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