Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Learn how Queen's is planning for our safe return to campus.

Campus Community

A safe return to campus

With the return to in-person learning during the Winter Term, students, faculty, and staff are reinvigorating the university. 

  • Professor David Hauser delivers a lecture for a first-year psychology course in the newly-renovated lecture hall in the Bioscience Complex. (Tim Forbes/Queen's University)
    Professor David Hauser delivers a lecture for a first-year psychology course in the newly-renovated lecture hall in the Bioscience Complex. (Tim Forbes/Queen's University)
  • Maya Khoorshed, Alexis Novakovic, and Nadia Mejilla work on their projects in one of the study spaces in Douglas Library. (Tim Forbes/Queen's University)
    Maya Khoorshed, Alexis Novakovic, and Nadia Mejilla work on their projects in one of the study spaces in Douglas Library. (Tim Forbes/Queen's University)
  • With the return to in-person learning, University Avenue is once again a busy place as Queen's community members make their way to their classes and workplaces. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    With the return to in-person learning, University Avenue is once again a busy place as Queen's community members make their way to their classes and workplaces. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • Breann Russell and Vincent Meh work out in the weight room at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. COVID-19 safety measures are in place to provide safe space for the Queen's community to exercise. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    Breann Russell and Vincent Meh work out in the weight room at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. COVID-19 safety measures are in place to provide safe space for the Queen's community to exercise. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • Queen's community members make use of the cardio room at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    Queen's community members make use of the cardio room at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • Students enter Dunning Hall for their classes. Faculty and staff worked hard to ensure a safe return to campus. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    Students enter Dunning Hall for their classes. Faculty and staff worked hard to ensure a safe return to campus. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • Helena Alexandra, a third-year sociology and business student, works on a project while sitting at the dining area in Mackintosh-Corry Hall. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    Helena Alexandra, a third-year sociology and business student, works on a project while sitting at the dining area in Mackintosh-Corry Hall. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • Friends Laura Pede and Alexandra Gorman share a booth near the dining area of Mackintosh-Corry Hall as they work on projects for their courses. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    Friends Laura Pede and Alexandra Gorman share a booth near the dining area of Mackintosh-Corry Hall as they work on projects for their courses. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • First-year science major and Queen's Gaels football team Niklas Henning walks to class shortly after the return in-person learning. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
    First-year science major and Queen's Gaels football team Niklas Henning walks to class shortly after the return in-person learning. (Bernard Clark/Queen's University)
  • Students make their way to their classes along the paths in front of Summerhill. With COVID-19 measures still in place, students returned to in-person learning on Feb. 28. (Tim Forbes/Queen's University)
    Students make their way to their classes along the paths in front of Summerhill. With COVID-19 measures still in place, students returned to in-person learning on Feb. 28. (Tim Forbes/Queen's University)

The Winter Term of 2022 was a semester of new starts for many at Queen’s University.

On Feb. 28 students were welcomed back to campus with the resumption of in-person learning. 

With many COVID-19 measures in place, students, faculty and staff once again entered lecture halls and classrooms, offices and gathering spaces, bringing a sense of life back to the university.  

Lining up for coffee, entering the lab, or waiting for the lights at Union Street and University Avenue, it’s clear that it is good to be back.  

For the Record – March 31, 2022

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette editor Andrew Carroll.

Advisory Search Committee – Vice-Dean, Health Sciences Education, Queen’s Health Sciences

Dr. Leslie Flynn’s second term as Vice-Dean, Education will end on June 30, 2022, and an Advisory Search Committee has been established to provide advice on the future Vice-Dean, Health Sciences Education with Queen’s Health Sciences. 

Committee Membership

  • Dr. Jane Philpott - Dean, Queen’s Health Sciences (Chair)
  • Dr. Marcia Finlayson - Vice-Dean (Queen’s Health Sciences) and Director, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
  • Christine Irving - Director of Operations, Queen’s Health Sciences
  • Dr. Ruzica Jokic - Assistant Dean, Distributed Medical Education
  • Kristy Lodewyks - Senior Staffing Officer, Queen’s Health Sciences (Secretary)
  • Dr. Anthony Sanfilippo - Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education
  • Dr. Erna Snelgrove-Clarke - Vice-Dean (Queen’s Health Sciences) and Director, School of Nursing
  • Dr. Denise Stockley - Co-Director, Master in Health Professions Education

Internal applications must be accompanied by a letter summarizing leadership and administrative experience, a curriculum vitae, the names and full contact information of three referees, and a letter from the applicant’s Department Head/Director in which the Head/Director expresses their support for the application. Applications are to be directed to: Dr. Jane Philpott, Dean of the Queen’s Health Sciences and CEO, SEAMO, c/o Kristy Lodewyks, Senior Staffing Officer, Queen’s Health Sciences (kristy.lodewyks@queensu.ca).

Review of applications will commence April 14, 2022 and will continue until the position is filled. Prospective candidates are encouraged to contact Kristy Lodewyks to request a detailed copy of the role description. Support to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that considers an applicant’s accessibility needs, will be provided in the recruitment processes. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Kristy Lodewyks, as indicated above.

Human Resources launches new website and intranet

Human Resources has launched a new and improved version of its website at queensu.ca/humanresources. Designed with users in mind, the site features a more modern look and feel with simplified navigation and usability.

“We wanted to take this opportunity to look at how we organize online information and resources that matter most to our staff, faculty, retirees, and prospective employees,” says Steven Millan, Associate Vice-Principal, Human Resources. “The overall design and content reflects the future that we envision in Human Resources and offers an improved experience for our users.”

As part of the website redesign, most of the existing online content has been moved to a secure intranet. Employees can access the intranet on the Human Resources website and are encouraged to explore the new features and become familiar with the navigation.

Web pages have been moved as part of this upgrade. Those experiencing issues or difficulties accessing the new website or intranet can contact hr.communications@queensu.ca for support.

Queen’s Black Faculty and Staff Caucus building toward a promising future

The group is committed to fostering a greater sense of community for all Black faculty and staff at Queen’s.

Queen's Black Faculty and Staff Caucus members Stephanie Simpson, Beverley Mullings, Kristin Moriah, and Katherine McKittrick.
Queen's Black Faculty and Staff Caucus members include, clockwise from top left: Stephanie Simpson, Beverley Mullings, Kristin Moriah, and Katherine McKittrick.

Community. Connection. Understanding. Progress.

These words serve as the building blocks for a group of Queen’s faculty and staff members seeking to infuse the sentiments into the fabric of the university. Born from what once was an email list in 2017, the Queen’s Black Faculty and Staff Caucus emerged. The group of more than 30 members represent a wide swath of disciplines in the Queen’s academic landscape – from neuroscience to geography to business.

This list of names and contact information, also known as an email listserv, supplied its members with helpful information about navigating both the Kingston and Queen’s communities, academic resources, and providing a support system in a homogenous environment. Growth of the email list would seem straightforward, but for those included in the group, the addition of names served as an opportunity to witness an element of progress in motion. When Beverley Mullings joined the Department of Geography in 2006, she was one of four Black faculty members in the Faculty of Arts and Science. In 2012, the death of Stephen Gyimah brought that number to three.

“I was surprised, dismayed, horrified that in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences there were only four black professors,” says Dr. Mullings, who was a professor at Syracuse University in New York before coming to Queen’s.

Through programs like the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusion (PICRDI) and the University Council on Anti-Racism and Equity (UCARE), a more concerted effort has been made, and remains ongoing, ­by the university to hire more Black faculty and staff. The by-product of that expanding representation on campus was the organic growth of the listserv that Black faculty and staff built largely by word of mouth.

“I would say 2017 is the year and it's a watershed year because there were finally enough people for us to actually do something together,” Dr. Mullings says. “Not necessarily formal, but we could all go somewhere in Kingston to meet and have dinner. It's an amazing thing when you've got numbers who know each other, who meet throughout the year, that you can become something more formal, collaborative, powerful.”

Ultimately, those dinners led to substantive conversations, which accelerated the formation of the Queen’s Black Faculty and Staff Caucus.

Prior to the 2017 formation of QBFSC, a foundational degree of dialogue came on March 12, 2015 inside the University Club at Queen’s. The dinner, co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, the Human Rights and Equity Office, the Division of Student Affairs, and the Office of Advancement was entitled Shaping the Future of Black Scholarship. The event, attended by Queen’s students, faculty, staff, and local community members, drew forth vibrant conversation on nurturing Black intellectual leadership, including a recommendation to increase representation of Black staff and faculty. One of the fundamental goals behind that recommendation was for Black students to see themselves represented throughout the institution. Stephanie Simpson, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion) hosted the event. Flashforward several years later and Simpson recalls a moment during a recent QBFSC meeting that highlighted the purpose of the caucus.

“What I recall from that meeting was just how elated people were to be in a virtual group with so many people who looked like them, who shared interests with them,” Simpson says. “There was just a real sense of joy in the room around simply not being alone. To be in a space where we could safely speak to and touch on all of those aspects of ourselves that don't find expression necessarily in other places in the university, I think, has been really important for people.”

Kristin Moriah, Assistant Professor of African American Literary Studies in the Department of English Language and Literature, played an integral role in raising the visibility of the group by creating its website. QBFSC helped Dr. Moriah, who came to Queen’s in 2018, gain a sense of support among other Black faculty members. Entrenched in many of those organic moments have been interdisciplinary discussions that have sparked new ideas.

“It’s been great,” says Dr. Moriah, who is also a Penn State Center for Black Digital Research Satellite Partner. “I met Yolande Bouka, who’s in Political Studies, through our meetings and that’s somebody who I now think of warmly as a colleague and who has become a partner with me in other projects. Yolande has become an advisor board member for the Black Studies Summer Seminar that I’m coordinating with a colleague at the University of Toronto. The Queen’s Black Faculty and Staff Caucus has provided us with a forum to meet each other and learn about our respective research.”

The group’s power in numbers came to pass during the summer of 2020. After the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, and as traction gained for the Black Lives Matter movement, QBFSC asserted itself into the public discourse. The caucus denounced the mistreatment of the BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Colour) community, while also supporting efforts to educate people about the history of anti-Black racism and violence in Canada and the United States. This is paired with their efforts to help Queen’s better understand Black communities outside North America — from the continent of Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and elsewhere — which overlaps with the diverse Black communities who are part of the caucus.

Katherine McKittrick, Professor and Black Studies Program Director, came to Queens in 2004 and in that time has witnessed and welcomed increasing numbers in the Black community at the university. She’s enjoyed the power of drawing connections with QBFSC members across varying disciplines and backgrounds. When plans for the Minor in Black Studies program in the Faculty of Arts and Science was in its infancy, Dr. McKittrick consulted with the group. The caucus has nurtured instances where members can celebrate their interconnected dynamics, from applauding the book written by member Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Senior Advisor, EDI Initiatives and Adjunct Lecturer, Faculty of Health Sciences) to participating in seminars involving member Oyedeji Ayonrinde (Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry).

“I love that social aspect of it,” says Dr. McKittrick. “Sharing ideas, sharing how to navigate Queen’s, sharing how to navigate Kingston. Just the joy of laughing with you right now about hair products. I don't have to over-explain it to you. It's a really beautiful way to make community.”

There is an optimistic outlook on the role the group can play in the months, years, and generations ahead. From offering a space of familiarity and support to being a group that is consulted during important, transformational moments at Queen’s.

“I see the caucus being a space for a voice that is consulted as a collective voice of a community and being able to weigh in in moments,” Dr. Mullings says.

For membership inquiries, please contact Kristin Moriah: kristin.moriah@queensu.ca.

Queen’s hosts U SPORTS Women’s Final 8 Basketball Championship starting March 31

Queen’s is hosting the top Canadian university women’s basketball teams starting Thursday, March 31 at the U SPORTS Women's Final 8 Basketball Championship.

The opening round will see the top-ranked Ryerson Rams face the UPEI Panthers (8) at noon on Thursday, followed by the Brock Badgers (4) vs. the Acadia Axewomen (5) at 3 p.m. The evening session sees the Winnipeg Wesmen (3) face the Laval Rouge et Or at 5:30 p.m., while the host Queen’s Gaels (7) take on the Saskatchewan Huskies (2) at 8 p.m. All games are being played at the Athletics and Recreation Centre.

The gold-medal game is set for Sunday, April 3 at 6 p.m.

Queen's is led into the tournament by OUA East First Team All-Star Julia Chadwick, who finished sixth in OUA scoring with 15.6 points per game and third in rebounding with 9.9 rebounds per game. Also leading the way is Sophie de Goede, a member of the 2021 U SPORTS National Women’s Rugby Championship winning Gaels squad, an OUA East Second Team All-Star after leading the OUA in rebounding, averaging 12.1 per game, while adding 9.8 points per game.

Tournament passes and single-game tickets are available for purchase at gogaelsgo.com.

Related articles

Gaels to open 2022 U SPORTS Final 8 Championship against Saskatchewan

Gaels' two-sport star Sophie de Goede on her time playing rugby and basketball, and playing two national championships at home

Good friends on and off the court, Emma Weltz and Laura Donovan capping year together at U SPORTS Women's Basketball Final 8

Queen’s updating its COVID-19 health and safety measures

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Queen’s has been working closely with provincial and local public health experts with the primary objective of protecting the health and safety of our community and to preserve the ability of our healthcare system to serve the local community.

Over the past six weeks, the pandemic outlook across the province has changed significantly. The Ontario government has lifted most public health measures.  Locally, health care authorities are indicating a continued decline in the number of COVID cases requiring hospitalization.

With this in mind, Queen’s is announcing the following changes to our COVID-19 health and safety measures for the start of the spring/summer term – as of May 1, 2022:

  • The university’s vaccination requirement will be suspended, at which point most students, faculty, and staff will no longer be required to provide proof that they are fully vaccinated to participate in in-person university activities. Most students looking to register for classes in the summer term with in-person components will now be able to do so, regardless of their vaccination status.
  • The university’s mandatory masking policy will be suspended.
  • The SeQure app daily screening will no longer need to be completed before attending in-person university activities
  • Certain activities and roles that involve third parties (such as health clinics, hospitals, elementary and secondary schools, and other organizations where students complete their placements) may have different requirements for both masking and vaccination that will still have to be followed. Students, staff, and faculty members should contact their respective faculty for details.

Everyone should be aware that the suspension of these measures is based on the current state of the pandemic and corresponding public health considerations. If the situation changes, Queen’s may bring back vaccination and/or masking requirements on short notice. If government mandates or public health instructions reinstate masking and/or vaccination requirements at any time after May 1, Queen’s will, of course, comply with any such mandates and implement appropriate processes to do so. To that end, the university will be looking at ways to continue to collect community vaccination information and we will update you with more details about that process when available.

If the university does need to reinstate its proof of vaccination requirement, students, faculty, and staff who are not fully vaccinated in accordance with the definition that is applicable at the time could find their in-person activities interrupted and/or may not be able to get necessary vaccinations in time to be able to return to campus. This may impact eligibility to remain in classes, employment status, eligibility to remain in residence, and access to on-campus resources or facilities. We strongly recommend maintaining up to date vaccination status to reduce the risk of interruption to your studies or work.

As we look ahead with cautious optimism, we must also emphasize that this pandemic is not yet over and preventing the spread of COVID-19 remains a priority. We strongly encourage all students, faculty, and staff to receive updated vaccinations and boosters, as these remain the best way to protect yourself and the community against serious illness from COVID-19. We would also encourage all community members to continue wearing masks indoors when in places that are crowded or involve close contact with others. Some individuals may prefer to continue wearing masks at all times when indoors, and some may choose not to do so. As a community, we need to be respectful of everyone’s choices and keep in mind that everyone’s situation is unique.

As always, we urge you to remain vigilant. If you are in contact with a COVID-19 case or experience symptoms of COVID-19, please consult the Ontario government’s COVID-19 self-assessment to determine if you should be tested or refer to the university’s Updated Isolation Protocols.

While the current situation is encouraging, we have seen that circumstances can change at any time, and the risks of new variants and outbreaks remain a very real possibility. Our entire community needs to remain flexible and adaptive in responding to ‘real time’ changes. In suspending the mask and proof of vaccination requirements for in-person university activities, the ability to reinstate either or both of these requirements if necessary is essential.

We anticipate that this announcement is welcome news to many but understand others may have concerns or questions.  Support for staff and faculty is available through the Employee and Family Assistance Program and additional wellness resources are available on the Human Resources website.  Undergraduate and graduate students can contact Empower Me, 24/7 from countries around the worldGood2Talk, a 24/7 support line for post-secondary students, or Student Wellness Services.

The last two years have been extraordinarily challenging for all of us, and we trust that you will continue to do your part to keep yourself and those in our community healthy and safe. Queen’s will continue to monitor public health directives and government decisions, and we will be updating the community as things change. We also recognize that many people may have more specific questions about how the lifting of health and safety measures may impact their work or study. More information on these topics will be shared as soon as it is available through email and on the Safe Return to Campus website.

Nominations open for the Michael Condra Outstanding Student Service Award

Do you know faculty and staff members who provide outstanding student service?

Nominations are invited for the Michael Condra Outstanding Student Service Award until March 31, 2021.

This annual award recognizes a faculty or staff member who goes above and beyond in providing service and support to students at Queen’s, other than in a teaching role.   

Details and nomination instructions are available on the Student Affairs website.

Highlighting student advocacy and equity at Queen’s

As part of Queen's University’s response to the findings of the first campus climate survey, the Student Experiences Survey, a number of events and initiatives have been undertaken this winter to centre the experiences of equity-deserving students, to provide opportunities for dialogue around a number of topics outlined in the survey, and to receive feedback on the steps towards improving campus culture.

Student Voices Week, running from March 27-April 2, features a variety of activities that amplify and celebrate equity-deserving student voices at Queen’s and is being run in partnership with campus partners and student groups.

The work to reflect on the survey results and shift campus culture has been facilitated a dedicated position in Student Affairs and is guided by the project’s Student Advisory Group.

“The results of the Student Experiences Survey show that equity-deserving students are disproportionately impacted by issues such as harassment, discrimination, exclusion, and sexual violence,” says Student Inclusion and Engagement Coordinator Taryn McKenna. “In our meetings, events and other outreach to students, we speak about these challenges and provide opportunities for dialogue, education and the development of ideas around improving campus culture at Queen’s.”

Programming this term has included several social media initiatives on Instagram, as well as open student feedback sessions, when students were invited to meet and discuss the survey results, and suggest areas of improvement, and ideas for actions. Conversations with staff and students from the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre, Yellow House, and Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC) are ongoing.

One initiative to help advance the findings of the survey was the creation of a monthly Sunday Supper Series. The first supper event was held virtually in late February on the topic of Creating Safe & Affirming Spaces for Trans, Non-Binary & Two-Spirit Peers. Attendees learned more about the survey results, and participated in a panel discussion featuring Dawn Martin, a Two Spirit gender fluid community leader and Seed Keeper, and Elliot Chapple, Director, EDII, in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

The next Sunday Supper Series will take place in person during Student Voices Week and will be on the topic of Creating a Culture of Consent at Queen’s. This event is a collaboration with the student group Consensual Humans and the student-led Gender Based Violence Awareness and Bystander Intervention Program Facilitators.

“We are making content updates in the Bystander Intervention Training to allow for more engagement with topics related to privilege, identity, and intersectionality,” says Husna Ghanizada, a third-year health sciences student who is the Education Outreach and Operations Student Coordinator for the Gender-Based Violence Awareness and Bystander Intervention Program and student advisor for the Student Experience Survey. “It has been rewarding to see how involved students have been in responding to the results of the SES. It shows that as students, we stand united in our efforts to create a safer and more inclusive campus.” 

Student Voices Week features student groups running information booths and drop-in sessions, as well as interactive, pop-up events. In addition, events include a ‘Crafternoon and Conversation’ activity hosted by Interfaith Chaplain Erin Burns, a sharing circle at the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre and a session on Addressing Microaggressions in Academic Settings hosted by QUIC, Student Academic Success Services (SASS), and the SES team.

“Creating a truly equitable campus will not be an easy process,” McKenna says. “But through shared responsibility and a unified commitment towards a meaningful and lasting culture shift, we have hope that all students can feel safe and welcome on this campus.”

For details about all Student Voices Week events and ongoing engagements, visit the Student Experience Survey website’s page on Student Opportunities and Initiatives

Kingston Homestay hosts needed for international students

The Queen’s School of English (QSoE) is looking for host families to host incoming international students in the Kingston area for a variety of short- (three to four week) and longer-term (12 to 14 week) placements.

International students (strictly following government travel requirements and all required health and safety protocols) are once again coming to Queen’s and Kingston to study English and there is a need to find homes to host them.

The Homestay experience is memorable for both students and hosts. When you host international students, your family benefits from lifelong friendships, global awareness, and stronger interpersonal skills.

Homestay hosts include couples, families with children, and individuals from a variety of backgrounds and diverse living situations. Hosts receive a generous allowance to offset expenses, 24/7 support, special health and safety training, and the opportunity to bring the world to their front door.

For more information about hosting international students, contact Canada Homestay Network at hostinfo@canadahomestaynetwork.ca, or 1-877-441-4443 ext. 2176. To learn more and apply, visit https://whyihost.canadahomestaynetwork.ca.

Erik Siksna named U SPORTS Top 8 Academic All-Canadian

Erik Siksna, Queen's Gaels volleyball player
Gaels men's volleyball team member Erik Siksna has been named a U SPORTS Top 8 Academic All-Canadian for the 2021-22 season, marking the third straight year a Queen’s student-athlete has been recognized with the award.

Erik Siksna, a member of the Queen's men's volleyball team, has been named a U SPORTS Top 8 Academic All-Canadian for the 2021-22 season.

Siksna, a third-year student in the Smith School of Business commerce program, was also named an Academic All-Canadian for the second time earlier this season.

“This award is a tremendous honour. To be recognized among the many outstanding student-athletes and Academic All-Canadians is truly special,” Siksna says. “I have always worked to prioritize both my athletics and academics, so this recognition is especially meaningful. With that being said, there is no doubt that my success wouldn’t be possible without the unwavering support from my teammates, coaches, and the university, which I am extremely grateful for.”

This marks the third year in a row that a Queen’s student-athlete has been named a Top 8 Academic All-Canadian, with Sophie de Goede (Women’s rugby and basketball) receiving the award in 2020-21, and Slater Doggett (Men’s hockey) in 2019-20. Overall, Siksna is the seventh Queen’s Gael to be recognized.

The Governor General’s Academic All-Canadian Commendation was founded by former Governor General of Canada David Johnston, who first honoured Canada’s Top 8 student-athletes in 2013. To achieve this award student-athletes must maintain an average of 80 per cent or better over the academic year while competing for one – or more – of their university’s varsity teams. Among these outstanding individuals, one female and one male student-athlete from each of the four U SPORTS conferences are selected annually to make up the Top 8. 

Siksna, an outside hitter for the Gaels, was named the OUA East Division Most Valuable Player for the 2021-22 season as well as a First Team OUA East Division All-Star.

“Erik Siksna has been one of our top student-athletes since his arrival on campus. He was named Rookie of the Year for Queen’s, the OUA, and U SPORTS in 2019 before competing with Team Canada at the FIVB Volleyball Men’s U21 World Championship this past summer,” says Leslie Dal Cin, Executive Director, Athletics & Recreation. “A natural leader and impact player on the court, Erik also excels in the classroom as a perpetual Academic All Canadian. Erik will continue to accomplish great things during his time at Queen’s, and serve as a fantastic example of what we celebrate in U SPORTS student-athletes.”

Off the court, Siksna volunteers as an assistant coach of a high school volleyball team, and helping mentor other student-athletes as a Gaels tutor.

In the classroom, Siksna is a two-time Academic All-Canadian and holds a 4.1 GPA and was a recipient of the Queen's University Excellent Scholarship for entering with an average above 90 per cent.

“It takes a special type of student-athlete to excel at the level Erik has been able to in just his first years both on and off the court. His calm, cool and collected demeaner has allowed him to manage the stress of both a heavy commerce work load as well as the big playoff moments,” says Gabriel deGroot, Head Coach of the Gaels men's volleyball team. “Erik’s success comes with little surprise when considering the time, effort and dedication he puts into every detail of his life.”

Visit the U SPORTS website for more information on this year’s Top 8 Academic All-Canadians.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Campus Community