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Raising awareness of Indigenous identity

The student-led Indigenous Awareness Week featured high profile speakers and artists, along with events designed to bring the community together.

  • Throughout the week, the Queen's community was invited to contribute their thoughts to the question, "What does the term Indigenous mean to you?" (Supplied Photo)
    Throughout the week, the Queen's community was invited to contribute their thoughts to the question, "What does the term Indigenous mean to you?" (Supplied Photo)
  • Breton Burke (Artsci'18) chows down on bannock and cedar tea on Wednesday, as part of a charitable sale in the BioSciences Atrium. (University Communications)
    Breton Burke (Artsci'18) chows down on bannock and cedar tea on Wednesday, as part of a charitable sale in the BioSciences Atrium. (University Communications)
  • Jaylene Cardinal was one of the Indigenous artists who visited campus on Thursday as part of Indigenous Awareness Week. (University Communications)
    Jaylene Cardinal was one of the Indigenous artists who visited campus on Thursday as part of Indigenous Awareness Week. (University Communications)
  • L-R: Ellyn Jade, Model from Whitesand First Nation; Alexandra Young (ArtSci '18), Co-President of Vogue Charity Fashion Show; Wiiwagaa'ige (Darian Doblej) (ArtSci '18), Co-Chair of QNSA Conference; and Siera Bearchell, Métis citizen and Miss Universe Canada. (Photo by Stefany Li (ArtSci '18))
    L-R: Ellyn Jade, Model from Whitesand First Nation; Alexandra Young (ArtSci '18), Co-President of Vogue Charity Fashion Show; Wiiwagaa'ige (Darian Doblej) (ArtSci '18), Co-Chair of QNSA Conference; and Siera Bearchell, Métis citizen and Miss Universe Canada. (Photo by Stefany Li (ArtSci '18))
  • Clément Chartier, President of the Métis National Council, speaks on Friday at an event co-sponsored by the Institute for Intergovernmental Relations. (University Communications)
    Clément Chartier, President of the Métis National Council, speaks on Friday at an event co-sponsored by the Institute for Intergovernmental Relations. (University Communications)

Organizers of Indigenous Awareness Week 2018 are taking a moment to reflect back on the past week’s celebration of and exploration of Indigenous identity.

The annual conference and festival featured remarks by Indigenous artists, leaders, and celebrities; Indigenous food and culture events; and education opportunities for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples.

The week was the result of hard work by 60 Queen's Native Student Association (QNSA) volunteers, and support from departments including the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, the Grad Club, and the Institute for Intergovernmental Relations.

For more updates from the Queen's Native Student Association, visit their Facebook page.

Learn more about this year's conference.

Human Rights Office adds two new roles

Lavie Williams is the new Inclusion & Anti-Racism Advisor, while Erin Clow takes on a new role as Education and Communication Advisor. 

The Human Rights Office has added two new inclusivity-centred positions designed to help remove barriers and build capacity at Queen’s. 

Lavie Williams (Artsci'14) and Dr. Erin Clow (PhD’14). (University Communications)
Lavie Williams, left, is the new Inclusion & Anti-Racism Advisor for the Human Rights Office at Queen's, while Erin Clow takes on a new role as Education and Communication Advisor. (University Communications)

In February, Erin Clow (PhD’14) took over the newly-created role of Education and Communication Advisor. Then, in March, Lavie Williams (Artsci'14) was hired as the inaugural Inclusion and Anti-racism Advisor within the Human Rights Office. 

“I am pleased to welcome Ms. Williams to the team and congratulate Dr. Clow on her new responsibilities,” says Stephanie Simpson (Artsci’95, Ed’97, MEd’11), Executive Director of the Human Rights and Equity Offices and University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights. “Establishing these positions was a recommendation of the Principal’s Implementation Commission on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusivity (PICRDI) final report, and these two will play a key role in building the climate that the PICRDI group strived to achieve.” 

Dr. Clow has worked in the Equity and Human Rights Offices since 2014. This new role will see her supporting the team in developing and implementing training and communication strategies relating to equity and human rights, expanding on her previous responsibilities as an Equity Advisor. 

“I am hopeful that we can continue to create educational and training programs that are accessible, thought provoking, and inspiring for members of the community,” she says. “Education and training affords a tremendous opportunity for growth and development, but with that comes responsibility. I am excited to experiment with new learning tools and strategies all in an effort to create relevant, practical, and interesting training and educational programs.” 

Ms. Williams, meanwhile, will play a role in developing, implementing, and monitoring institutional inclusion and anti-oppression strategies, with a particular focus on anti-racism and its intersections.  

She will also act as a central point of contact for individuals and units who wish to access all related anti-oppression and anti-racism initiatives, processes and services at Queen’s. 

“Overall, I hope to collaborate with and empower our community to achieve substantive change,” she says. “I am here as a source of support, advice and assistance for individuals impacted by oppression and exclusion, while also seeking to deconstruct the systems that have built and perpetuate oppressive forces like racism.” 

Both see the important role the community must play in order to build a more inclusive Queen’s – through education, continued momentum, and challenging the status quo. Ms. Williams points out there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach to tackling issues of diversity and inclusion, which is why her role will involve spending time with equity-seeking communities and organizations both within Queen’s and externally.  

“Aptly, the Anti-Racism Directorate of Ontario defines inclusion as recognizing, welcoming, and making space for diversity," she says. “This definition highlights our duty to support the growth and wellbeing of all. It is imperative that the most vulnerable in our society are protected and assisted in reaching full participation so that we are all able to enjoy and benefit from the true diversity our communities and our world has to offer.” 

To learn more about the Queen's Human Rights Office, visit queensu.ca/humanrights. For updates from the Equity and Human Rights Offices, visit the “Together We Are” blog website

Innovation bootcamp goes global

The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre is working with the Bader International Study Centre to bring entrepreneurship to the castle.

Study space at the BISC. (Photo by Lucy Carnaghan)
Study space at the Bader International Study Centre. Soon, budding entrepreneurs will be able to access co-working space and other resources as a new entrepreneurship program launches at the castle. (Photo by Lucy Carnaghan)

A group of Queen’s students will be taking a trip to the past this fall to prepare themselves for their future.

The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) is expanding its annual summer entrepreneurship bootcamp to the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) for the first time starting this year.

“It has never been more important for entrepreneurs to look beyond our borders for opportunities,” says Greg Bavington (Sc’85), Executive Director of the DDQIC. “Many Canadian undergraduate students have not had the benefit of an international experience necessary to be successful in entrepreneurship abroad. The i²TRM program is intended to give them that experience and gain a historical and international context for innovation and entrepreneurship in London, the cradle of the industrial economy.”

The i²TRM (International Innovation Term) program at the BISC is designed for upper-year students in any faculty who are looking to deepen their knowledge of entrepreneurship and eventually start their own businesses.

It is anticipated this new offering at the BISC will attract up to 20 students to the U.K. in its first year.

Students who are accepted into this pilot program will spend time in Kingston with the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI) program in August, and kick-start their entrepreneurial ambitions at the castle in September. They will complete a one-week business bootcamp at Queen’s campus and then travel to the BISC.

To help prepare them to launch their own businesses, the students will take up to three entrepreneurship and innovation courses at the BISC. The program will launch with a one-week intensive bootcamp on main campus at the end of August, followed by travel to England where students will join Castle Orientation, then continue their bootcamp for another week. The courses will be taught over a one-week intensive period by Mr. Bavington, as well as the DDQIC’s Academic Director James McLellan and Associate Professor Sidneyeve Matrix.

"This program is ideal for students with an interest in innovation and entrepreneurship in an international context,” noted Dr. McLellan. "In addition to developing a foundation in entrepreneurship and starting their own business ventures, students will have an opportunity to visit and learn from major centres of creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship in the UK through formal and self-curated field trips. Students will also receive valuable mentoring and insights from members of the London node in DDQIC’s Global Network, who will be providing guest lectures and feedback to student ventures.”

Once they land at the castle, the students will have the balance of the term to try to launch their business. During this time, the students will be networking, taking field trips to London and other parts of the European Union, and benefit from guest lectures and mentorship from the London node of the DDQIC’s global network.

The term will conclude with a final pitch competition, with the winners receiving seed funding to give their business some additional support.

To help the new offering get off to a strong start, the BISC is looking to add co-working space and a makerspace on the castle grounds. This would offer the budding entrepreneurs more space for meetings and the resources to help build and test their product prototypes. Hugh Horton, Executive Director of the BISC, says he hopes to have these new spaces ready for the fall.

“This new offering combines cutting-edge training and skills with the strengths of our historic environment and tight-knit campus community, as well as access to Queen’s alumni network in the U.K.,” says Dr. Horton. “The entrepreneurship courses and resources will broaden the range of programming available to students and offer a unique and valuable learning experience.”

The DDQIC is planning to host an information session this spring to answer questions and attract entrepreneurial students to the program. For dates and more information, please contact innovation.centre@queensu.ca

To learn more about the i²TRM program, visit the BISC website.

Think DIFF-erently

DIFF – the Diversity & Inclusion Film Festival – will take you from Australia, to Uganda, to China, and Egypt – all without leaving Queen’s.

A new film festival at Queen’s will bring the Queen’s community together for reflections and celebrations of people from all over the world.

The Diversity and Inclusion Film Festival (DIFF), which runs from March 20 to March 28 – is being hosted by the Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS), the Queen’s University International Centre, and Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, among others.

Atul Jaiswal, International Commissioner for the SGPS and doctoral candidate in Rehabilitation Science, says the goal of the festival is to strengthen the connections between the domestic and international students.

“We intend to use movies as a tool to showcase the culture unique to the specific region and how people could appreciate each other’s culture and start accepting and including everyone,” he says.

A promotional image for "Bran Nue Dae", a film about an Aboriginal Australian teenager which will be shown at the Diversity & Inclusion Film Festival. (Supplied Photo)
A promotional image for Bran Nue Dae. The film, which is about an Aboriginal Australian teenager named Willie, will be shown at the Diversity & Inclusion Film Festival. (Supplied Photo)

The festival will feature five different films – each representing different areas of the world. The first up, Bran Nue Dae, is about the coming of age of an Aboriginal Australian teenager.

Other films to be examined include Queen of Katwe, about a Ugandan girl who becomes a Woman Candidate Master in chess, on Wednesday, March 21; About Elly, a murder mystery involving several Iranian couples on vacation, on Friday, March 23; Confucius, a biographical film about the legendary philosopher, on Tuesday, March 27; and Cairo Drive, a film about navigating traffic in Egypt set against the backdrop of the 2011 revolution, on Wednesday, March 28.

Each film screening will be accompanied by a panel discussion led by students’ facilitators from the same region to engage the Queen's community and build cultural understanding. The festival will conclude with the screening of Cairo Drive and a Jeopardy! event all about world cultures.

“We believe that this event may start the conversations around the importance of each culture that the students from different parts of the world bring on campus,” says Mr. Jaiswal. “One cannot appreciate the beauty of a rainbow until one understands the importance of each colour in making the rainbow possible. Similarly, on campus, once we start appreciating other person’s culture, we would be more respectful and accepting towards them and then the doors would be more open to share and learn from each other.”

For more information on the festival, please visit the SGPS Facebook page.

Standardized Patient program extends beyond campus

Queen's-based program uses actors to enhance training in the community.

The Kingston community will soon benefit from an expanded Queen’s University Standardized Patient and Objective Standardized Clinical Examination (SP&OSCE) program – a unique educational experience that uses actors to enhance training.

A  is an actor who is trained to portray the historical, emotional, and physical characteristics of a real person for educational purposes. This is done through simulated interviews and examinations. Standardized patients are also trained to provide feedback so students can gain insight into their strengths as well as areas requiring improvement. 

[Standardized Patient program]
Standardized patients go through a rigourous training program.

Started in 1992, the SP&OSCE Program has recruited and deployed more than 100 standardized patients in clinical skills, training and examinations for Faculty of Health Science students. Actors can take part in a variety of scenarios ranging from routine to emergent situations.

“For the past 25 years, Queen’s has run a successful standardized patient program catering to the Faculty of Health Sciences,” says Rebecca Snowdon, Community Outreach Coordinator. “Now we want to offer our services outside of the university to provide realistic, hands-on training to other departments, teams and organizations. We can provide a valuable service to the Kingston area with our standardized patients.”

Simulated learning provides a safe, yet realistic environment in which professionals from all fields can practice their skills. As the SP&OSCE program expands to the broader community, companies and organizations can hire actors to work in faculty development, dispute resolution, business, law enforcement, customer service, pharmacy, and physiotherapy.

“Standardized patients can be used in a wide range of applications outside of medicine. Over the past year we’ve been receiving an influx of bookings and requests from organization outside the university, it seemed a natural time to expand.  We’re excited to share the benefits of simulated learning,” says Kate Slagle, the SP&OSCE Program Manager.

The launch is set to begin this month with an open house at the Queen’s School of Medicine Clinical Teaching Centre on Monday, March 26 from 1 to 4 pm.  At the open house visitors will learn more about what the program has to offer, take a tour of the facility, and hear testimonials from those who have benefited from the program.

For more information visit the website.

Governor of the Bank of Canada shows his Queen’s colours

  • Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz
    Stephen Poloz, Governor of the Bank of Canada, delivers the Chancellor David Dodge Lecture in Public Finance, entitled “Today’s Labour Market and the Future of Work.”
  • Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz
    Stephen Poloz, Governor of the Bank of Canada, holds up the newly-unveiled $10 bill featuring civil rights pioneer Viola Desmond.
  • Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz
    Queen's students, staff and faculty members fill BMO Atrium at Smith School of Business as Stephen Poloz delivers the Chancellor David Dodge Lecture in Public Finance.
  • Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz
    Queen's faculty and administration members listen as Stephen Poloz, Governor of the Bank of Canada, speaks at BMO Atrium in Goodes Hall on Tuesday, March 13.
  • Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz
    Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz answers a question during a media conference as Bank of Canada Media Relations Consultant Rebecca Ryall looks on.

Donning the Queen’s jacket he wore during his student days, Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz (Artsci’78), delivered the Chancellor David Dodge Lecture in Public Finance on Tuesday, March 13 at the BMO Atrium at Smith School of Business.

Back at his alma mater, Dr. Poloz spoke on “Today’s Labour Market and the Future of Work,” fielded a number of questions and took part in a series of events where he met with students, faculty, and administration.

Dr. Poloz earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Queen’s. He is the third Queen’s graduate to hold the central bank’s top job. Chancellor Emeritus Dodge (Arts’65, LLD’02) served as governor from 2001 to 2008, and Gerald Bouey (Arts’48, LLD’81) headed the bank from 1973 to 1987.

Agreement highlights college-university collaboration

Queen’s online Bachelor of Health Sciences program will offer advanced standing to students from various college programs across the province.

A doctor uses a touch screen. (iStock)
A doctor uses a touch screen. (iStock)

Queen’s University has signed agreements with 10 Ontario colleges which will allow students enrolled in a one-year health-centred certificate program to gain advanced standing in a Queen’s online health degree.

New articulation agreements signed with colleges across Ontario, including Kingston’s St. Lawrence College, will allow graduates of the colleges’ Pre-Health Sciences advanced pathway who enroll in the Queen’s online Bachelor of Health Sciences program to receive credit for roughly one semester of courses.

Colleges who have signed onto this agreement:
• Algonquin College, Ottawa
• Cambrian College, Sudbury
• Fleming College, Peterborough
• Georgian College, Barrie
• Humber College, Toronto
• Loyalist College, Belleville
• Niagara College, Niagara-on-the-Lake
• Northern College, Timmins
• Sheridan College, Toronto
• St. Lawrence College, Kingston

“These agreements are an example of our commitment to collaboration and innovation within the higher education system,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “We are simplifying the process for qualified students who are seeking a high-quality education in the health field, while also delivering that education in a way that is flexible and forward-looking. We look forward to welcoming these students and helping them begin rewarding careers in healthcare.”

The agreements are effective immediately and are designed to pair the students’ introductory training and experience in health and healthcare with the necessary theoretical knowledge to pursue a variety of health professions or further studies at the university level.

“We are so pleased to work with Queen’s University to be able to offer this new pathway to our students,” says Glenn Vollebregt, President and CEO of St. Lawrence College. “We know that many of our students are just beginning their post-secondary journey and opening up accessible ways for them to be able to achieve their educational goals is an important way we can help them on their career path.”

Post-secondary student mobility has been a priority of the Ontario government. In 2011, the government established the Ontario Council on Articulation and Transfer (ONCAT) to enhance student pathways and reduce barriers for students looking to transfer among Ontario’s 45 publicly assisted postsecondary institutions.

In response, Ontario universities and colleges have stepped up their efforts to develop transfer credit policies and practices, making it easier for students to choose their path through the postsecondary system. According to ONCAT, 55,000 students transfer institutions each year in Ontario.

Queen’s receives dozens of college graduates each year through academic pathways that have been established between individual faculties and colleges across Canada, including a collaborative degree in Music Theatre where students complete two years at St. Lawrence College and two years at Queen’s.

To learn more about the Queen’s online Bachelor of Health Sciences degree, visit bhsc.queensu.ca. Applications for the Spring 2018 term are now open.

Policies posted for review and feedback

Members of the Queen’s community can review and offer feedback on several draft policies recently updated by the university.

The list of updated policies includes:

The University Secretariat and Legal Counsel asks the Queen’s community to submit feedback via email to policies@queensu.ca by Friday, March 16 at 4 pm. 

International at Home makes a splash

  • Students, staff, and faculty mix at a reception before the concert. (Photo: University Communications)
    Students, staff, and faculty mix at a reception before the concert. (Photo: University Communications)
  • Lawrence Cherney (left), Artistic Director of Water Passion After St. Matthew, shared his insight with Queen’s students before the performance began. (Photo: University Communications)
    Lawrence Cherney (left), Artistic Director of Water Passion After St. Matthew, shared his insight with Queen’s students before the performance began. (Photo: University Communications)
  • The stage was set with seventeen large water bowls, which were used throughout the performance as a symbol of transition. (Photo: University Communications)
    The stage was set with seventeen large water bowls, which were used throughout the performance as a symbol of transition. (Photo: University Communications)
  • Lawrence Cherney, Artistic Director of Water Passion After St. Matthew, introduces the concert before the performance begins. (Photo: University Communications)
    Lawrence Cherney, Artistic Director of Water Passion After St. Matthew, introduces the concert before the performance begins. (Photo: University Communications)
  • Soundstreams Canada, conducted by David Fallis , takes to the stage for their multicultural performance of Water Passion After St. Matthew. (Photo: University Communications)
    Soundstreams Canada, conducted by David Fallis , takes to the stage for their multicultural performance of Water Passion After St. Matthew. (Photo: University Communications)

An expert mixture of sound, performance, and water artistry earned a standing ovation at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts during the March International at Home concert.

Soundstreams Canada presented Water Passion After St. Matthew, a dramatic reimagining of Bach’s St. Matthew’s Passion composed by Tan Dun, a renowned Chinese composer and conductor. The concert wove Chinese contemporary classical strings, Peking Opera, Mongolian overtone singing, and water to create a soundscape in a powerful performance of the biblical text.

The four-part yearly concert series is a collaboration between the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International) and the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. The series brings domestic and international students together with the wider Kingston community to bridge intercultural differences and create a sense of community through music. Departments and units across the university sponsored tickets for distribution across campus, matched by the Isabel.

“The cross-cultural context of the performance was a perfect complement to the mission of the International at Home series by celebrating a mixture of cultures together,” says Kathy O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International). “My office was honoured to make this performance more accessible for students at Queen’s to immerse themselves in international cultures and connect.”

Check out the photos of the reception and concert above, and keep up with more performances at the Isabel on their events page.

Proposals for reconciliation

Three Indigenous artists presented art proposals Monday as part of a project to bring First Nations art into the Faculty of Law atrium.

  • Ms. Claus showcases her proposal at Monday's open house. It consists of wampum belts made of translucent purple coloured and frosted clear acrylic sheets and hung vertically from the ceiling. (University Communications)
    Ms. Claus showcases her proposal at Monday's open house. It consists of wampum belts made of translucent purple coloured and frosted clear acrylic sheets and hung vertically from the ceiling. (University Communications)
  • Ms. Claus' proposal is entitled “words that are lasting”. Wampum belts are mnemonic aids utilized by the Haudenosaunee and other Indigenous peoples within oral nation to nation agreements. (University Communications)
    Ms. Claus' proposal is entitled “words that are lasting”. Wampum belts are mnemonic aids utilized by the Haudenosaunee and other Indigenous peoples within oral nation to nation agreements. (University Communications)
  • Rebecca Baird’s proposal is entitled “Kihewataniy” (“eagle feather” in Cree). The eagle's feather is honored by Indigenous peoples, and is a symbol of truth, power and freedom. It has been included as part of the reconciliation initiative and has been established as a legal oath-swearing option in the courts of Canada. (University Communications)
    Rebecca Baird’s proposal is entitled “Kihewataniy” (“eagle feather” in Cree). The eagle's feather is honored by Indigenous peoples, and is a symbol of truth, power and freedom. It has been included as part of the reconciliation initiative and has been established as a legal oath-swearing option in the courts of Canada. (University Communications)
  • Ms. Baird speaks to visitors at Monday's open house. If her proposal is successful, the feather she has designed would be suspended in the air above the Gowlings Atrium. (University Communications)
    Ms. Baird speaks to visitors at Monday's open house. If her proposal is successful, the feather she has designed would be suspended in the air above the Gowlings Atrium. (University Communications)
  • Wally Dion’s proposal is entitled “It will put your mind at ease, that we still remember these words.” The art piece consists of three large wampum belts suspended vertically from the wall with three smaller belts woven between them. (University Communications)
    Wally Dion’s proposal is entitled “It will put your mind at ease, that we still remember these words.” The art piece consists of three large wampum belts suspended vertically from the wall with three smaller belts woven between them. (University Communications)
  • Mr. Dion speaks to Norman Vorano, Curator of Indigenous Art at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, about his proposal at an afternoon reception. (University Communications)
    Mr. Dion speaks to Norman Vorano, Curator of Indigenous Art at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, about his proposal at an afternoon reception. (University Communications)
  • Bill Flanagan, Dean of the Faculty of Law, and Douglas Cardinal, renowned architect and member of the Queen's Faculty of Law Indigenous Art Commission, examine the proposals. (University Communications)
    Bill Flanagan, Dean of the Faculty of Law, and Douglas Cardinal, renowned architect and member of the Queen's Faculty of Law Indigenous Art Commission, examine the proposals. (University Communications)

When visitors pass through the Faculty of Law atrium this fall, they will see the faculty’s commitment to reconciliation writ large. A piece of art will be installed to help increase the visibility of Indigenous art and culture, promote the recognition of Indigenous territory on campus, and create a welcoming space for Indigenous Peoples.

The question remains: will the art take the form of an eagle feather, or of wampum belts?

The Story So Far
Indigenous art to appear in Law atrium - Sept 20, 2017
Queen’s Law reveals shortlisted proposals for Indigenous Art Commission - Mar 1, 2018
● The successful artist will be named by the end of March.
● The art will be installed this fall.

As a committee evaluates the three options they have received in response to their recent request for proposals, the artists had a chance Monday to make their case directly to the Queen’s community.

Artists Wally Dion, Rebecca Baird, and Hannah Claus were on campus to demonstrate their ideas during an open house and a public reception. Mr. Dion’s and Ms. Claus’ ideas involve installing large vertical wampum belts in the Gowling WLG Atrium, while Ms. Baird has suggested suspending a large feather from the rafters.

The purpose of Monday’s events was to solicit comments from the Queen’s community regarding the proposals via an online survey. The comments will inform the committee’s final decision, which will be revealed later this month.

“Thank you to everyone who came out to our two public events, and to those who have taken the time to register their comments,” says Dean Bill Flanagan, chair of the committee. “This project will help our faculty contribute to the important cause of reconciliation in Canada, with the inclusion of a prominent work of Indigenous art that reflects historical and contemporary issues relevant to Indigenous Peoples and law.”

The goal is to complete the art installation this fall. For more information, visit the Faculty of Law Indigenous Art Commission webpage.

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