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Research Prominence

Forecasting Kingston's future

This year’s Business Forecast Luncheon is going local.

For more than three decades the event, hosted by Smith School of Business, has fostered connections with the Kingston community as Queen’s experts discuss the financial and economic outlook for the coming year, often on the national or provincial level.

Business Forecast Luncheon 2018
Queen's faculty experts Julian Barling (Smith SChool of Business), Betsy Donald (Geography and Planning), and Evan Dudley (Smith School of Business), are presenting at the Business Forecast Luncheon being hosted at the Four Points Sheraton on Thursday, Dec. 7. 

This year’s event, being hosted Thursday, Dec. 7 from noon to 2 pm at the Four Points Sheraton, will take on a more local focus, explains Evan Dudley, Assistant Professor of Finance at Smith School of Business, will be discussing how Kingston ranks relative to other communities of similar size in terms of economic growth and job creation as well as a national economic forecast.

“What I’ve learned from the attendees is they are very interested in what Queen’s researchers have to say about the local economy. I think that is the missing piece for the event and that is what we are bringing to the table this year,” he says. “At the luncheon I will do a national macro-economic forecast but I will also talk about the local economy, which is much more difficult as there’s not a lot of information on Kingston because it’s a smaller city.”

Joining him will be Julian Barling, Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Borden Chair of Leadership at Smith School of Business, and Betsy Donald, Professor, Department of Geography and Planning.

At the luncheon Dr. Barling will talk about early childhood environments and how they foster leadership outcomes, a topic that Dr. Dudley describes as “fascinating”.

“It’s original research and he will be talking about that, with an application to Kingston of course,” he says. “He’s very knowledgeable about what’s going on here.”

Dr. Donald, the first faculty member from outside the business school to be featured at the luncheon, specializes in economic geography with a particular focus on innovation and regional economic development, urban planning and governance, and sustainable food systems. Her talk will also take a look at Kingston in relation to where it stands in comparison to other cities now and going forward.

Following the presentations there will be a question-and-answer session, moderated by Dr. Dudley, where audience members can put their queries on a wide range of topics directly to the experts.  A hot topic at past luncheons has been development projects and whether or not the City of Kingston should move ahead with them.

“When you look at Kingston, we do well in some dimensions but in terms of growth relative to other cities Kingston is maybe in the middle of the pack,” Dr. Dudley points out. “That’s a discussion we have every year and some people think that is the right place to be while others feel we should move up. There’s definitely a trade-off there and both Dr. Barling and Dr. Donald are going to be speaking about that trade-off.”

Tickets for the Business Forecast Luncheon can be purchased online at Smith School of Business website or contact Samantha Arniel at 613-533-6000 ext. 73800 or samantha.arniel@queensu.ca.

The beauty of research

Calling all photographers, amateur and professional! The third edition of the Queen’s Art of Research photo contest is officially open.

The contest’s goal is to creatively capture the research process across disciplines and demonstrate the importance of research at the local, national and international levels. This year’s contest is open to faculty, staff, students and alumni, and encourages researchers in any discipline to showcase their research in action.

Everyone is encouraged to think creatively; the only limit is your imagination. Photos can come anywhere from across the globe to the lens of a microscope. The 2015 and 2016 contests gave Queen’s many inspiring images of the research happening across the institution.

Images will be featured on the Queen’s Research webpage, and will be used in various Queen’s research promotion materials. Photo credit will be given where possible.

There are four categories to submit an image to this year: Community Collaborations, Invisible Discoveries, Out in the Field, and Art in Action. The winner in each category will receive a prize of $500.

Also, there are two other $500 prizes available this year. One prize will be for People’s Choice, which will be determined by an online vote from members of the Queen’s community. The other prize will be for Best Description, which will be given to the most creative image caption.

The contest closes on Jan. 31, 2018 at 4 pm. Please visit the Art of Research website for more information, and get snapping.

  • Amphibian from the Inside. Rute Clemente Carvalho. Postdoc, Biology. Location: Zeiss stereomicroscope in the laboratory. The evolutionary process called miniaturization can lead to morphological changes in body structures. The internal morphology of tiny specimens can be seen/observed using a special staining technique. This method digests the muscles, making them transparent, and colours the bones and cartilages. In the case of this froglet, it has a body size of around 18mm, and features like osteoderms i
    Tulugak on the Crucifix. Norman Vorano. Faculty, Art History & Art Conservation. Location: Pond Inlet, Nunavut. Dr. Norman Vorano was conducting historical research with Inuit elders in Nunavut in April and May of 2016. One woman recounted the loss of cultural traditions as a result of the changes that happened during the twentieth century, particularly from residential schools, the missionaries, and the waves of southerners who flooded into the Arctic after the Second World War. After they broke for lunch, Vorano stepped outside. The white sky was indistinguishable from the ground. He walked past a towering crucifix erected behind the Catholic Church, on an imposing hill overlooking the community. A raven flew down from the ethereal sky, perched on the Crucifix, and began vocalizing. For Western culture, the raven is a harbinger of death. For Inuit culture, tulugak – raven – is a tricky fellow that symbolizes creation.
  • Window on a Window to the Universe. Mark Chen. Faculty, Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy. Location: SNOLAB, Sudbury, Ontario. An underwater camera mounted in the SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory) neutrino detector captures a snapshot image when the 12-metre diameter acrylic sphere is 85% full. Viewed from below, ropes are seen crisscrossing the top of the sphere extending down (foreground), and each of the shiny cells that are visible is a 20-cm diameter super-sensitive light detector.
    Window on a Window to the Universe. Mark Chen. Faculty, Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy. Location: SNOLAB, Sudbury, Ontario. An underwater camera mounted in the SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory) neutrino detector captures a snapshot image when the 12-metre diameter acrylic sphere is 85% full. Viewed from below, ropes are seen crisscrossing the top of the sphere extending down (foreground), and each of the shiny cells that are visible is a 20-cm diameter super-sensitive light detector. The water-air interface inside and outside the acrylic spherical tank creates visual distortions as light refracts at the optical boundary. Once full, the upgraded detector turns on in Fall 2016, ten years after the original SNO detector completed its Nobel-prize winning studies.
  • Aldonza. Tim Fort. Faculty, Dan School of Drama & Music. Location: Mainstage, Weston Playhouse, Vermont.
    Aldonza. Tim Fort. Faculty, Dan School of Drama & Music. Location: Mainstage, Weston Playhouse, Vermont. This moment arrives at the end of the staging for the musical number "Aldonza" from The Man of La Mancha – one of two musicals Dr. Tim Fort directed at the Weston Playhouse in Vermont in the summer of 2016. Many of the show's creative team are Broadway veterans, including the designer and the performer playing Aldonza – whose character is pictured ignoring the aggressions of the muleteers as they sing to her in this musical version of the Don Quixote story. Dr. Fort’s research interests lie in lighting and staging, and he has been a producing director at the Weston Playhouse for the past 30 years.
  • Amphibian from the Inside. Rute Clemente Carvalho. Postdoc, Biology. Location: Zeiss stereomicroscope in the laboratory.
    Amphibian from the Inside. Rute Clemente Carvalho. Postdoc, Biology. Location: Zeiss stereomicroscope in the laboratory. The evolutionary process called miniaturization can lead to morphological changes in body structures. The internal morphology of tiny specimens can be seen/observed using a special staining technique. This method digests the muscles, making them transparent, and colours the bones and cartilages. In the case of this froglet, it has a body size of around 18mm, and features like osteoderms in the skin and hyperossification on the skeleton can be observed. The knowledge of morphological structures can help researchers understand the evolution of the species’ behaviour and ecology of the species, and its phylogenetic relationships with related species.

Uniting Queen's research and entrepreneurship

The Foundry program combines the passion and skill of student entrepreneurs with the research smarts of Queen’s academics to form successful start-ups.

Over the years, Queen’s researchers have made many important and impactful discoveries – helping plants grow more effectively, ensuring car engines stay lubricated for longer, and unpacking the tiny building blocks that make up our universe to name just a few examples. The question for the university is always how to take these discoveries to the next step.

RockMass Technologies was the first group to pilot the Foundry program. (Supplied Photo)
RockMass Technologies was the first group to pilot the Foundry program. (Supplied Photo)

In recent years, Canada’s major funding agencies have been placing more emphasis on how some of the valuable research conducted at universities like Queen’s can move from discovery to commercialization. But bringing a product to market takes time and resources, and sometimes faculty members prefer to teach and continue their research. This means the university must create other avenues to get this research to market.

One such initiative is the Foundry program, which connects student entrepreneurs in the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI) program with intellectual property that could have some commercial potential. The program was inspired by similar efforts at universities such as Arizona State, and has been piloted for the last two years by the Queen’s Office of Partnerships and Innovation and the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC).

How does the Foundry program work?
1) The researcher discloses their information to the Technology Transfer Unit of the Office of Partnerships and Innovation (OPI-TTU) using the invention disclosure form (Word - 90 KB).

2) OPI-TTU assesses the patentability and commercial potential. 

3) If accepted as a commercial development project, the OPI-TTU starts the patent protection process.

4) OPI-TTU then pitches the project to groups of interested students.

5) The student groups express their interest in the project and begin interacting with the researchers to learn about the work in more detail.

6) The students present a proposal to the OPI-TTU and the researchers.

7) If the proposal is accepted, the students form a new company and OPI-TTU enters into a renewable six-month option agreement with the company to start the commercial development process.

8) If all goes well during the option period, the OPI-TTU and the company can enter into a longer-term license agreement.

“As research transitions from business concept to start-up to viable business, the team behind it needs to change,” says Greg Bavington (Sc’85), Executive Director of the DDQIC. “The researcher is not necessarily the same person who is interested in determining if their idea has commercial merit, and that person is not necessarily the one who wants to work in a start-up environment. This program is designed to help ease that transition from research to start-up.”

The Foundry program already produced two viable businesses during its pilot. RockMass Technologies provides a mobile 3D mapping tool for geologists – a device that was based on the research of Professor Joshua Marshall and then-PhD candidate, now graduate, Marc Gallant (Sc’16). Dr. Marshall and Dr. Gallant worked with the Office of Partnerships and Innovation to file for patent protection for their technology and set up an agreement with RockMass Technologies, which was founded by six Queen’s students in the QICSI program, to develop the technology. 

The second pilot of the Foundry program began earlier this year, when a five-member team of Queen’s students formed Spectra Plasmonics. The company took on the development of a product based on the chemical detection research of Professors Aristides Docoslis and Carlos Escobedo – both Chemical Engineering professors – along with doctoral candidate Hannah Dies (MSc’21, Meds’21). Spectra Plasmonics has since gone on to win a global business competition in Singapore, and also placed in another competition in India.

“There are increased expectations from government and society around commercialization, and how we prepare our students to innovate, to be flexible, and to start their own businesses,” says James McLellan, Academic Director of the DDQIC and Professor in the department of Chemical Engineering. “At the same time, there is an increasing interest and increasing amount of support for entrepreneurship on campus and in the community. It’s an alignment of stars and an alignment of interests.”

With two successful pilots completed, the plan is to expand the program. The DDQIC and Office of Partnerships and Innovation are seeking faculty members with intellectual property that could be commercialized in hopes of partnering them up with teams of entrepreneurial students. The goal is to have five Foundry companies participating in QICSI this year.

“The Foundry program is an avenue that we are exploring in addition to our traditional licensing efforts,” says Ramzi Asfour, Assistant Director, Commercial Development, with the Office of Partnerships and Innovation. "We hope these companies grow here in Kingston and form close collaborative relationships with the research groups at Queen's. Ideally, the companies would bring problems from industry to the labs and help create great opportunities for talented research students supported by funding programs that are designed to enhance commercialization."

If you are a Queen’s researcher with intellectual property and you would like to explore its commercial potential, or if you would like to learn more about the Foundry program, visit the DDQIC’s website.

A full day of inspiration

As soon as Claire Davies (Mechanical and Materials Engineering) heard that the Queen’s Faculty Writing Retreat had been scheduled, she blocked the day off in her calendar and registered online.

Faculty Writing Retreat
The Faculty Writing Retreat, hosted by the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research), provides faculty members an opportunity to focus on developing new writing skills and to meet with peers from across the university. (University Communications)

“I find that I don’t have the discipline to schedule that sort of time in my regular work week. If I close my office door and a student knocks, I feel obliged to respond. Those small interruptions send me off-track and often times I will then check my emails, respond to them, and never regain focus properly.”

Building on the success of three previous retreats, the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) is hosting another Faculty Writing Retreat at the Donald Gordon Centre on Thursday, Dec. 7 from 8:30 am-5 pm.

For busy scholars who have difficulty carving out uninterrupted time for writing, or struggle finding motivation to write, this retreat offers a full day of inspiration. With a quiet, comfortable and isolated space to indulge in long blocks of uninterrupted writing time, small group discussions with colleagues from across the university, and private one-on-one consultations with University Research Services and the Writing Centre, the Faculty Writing Retreat provides an opportunity for faculty to focus on writing projects alongside a community of support.

This Writing Retreat eases the struggles all sorts of writers face explains Susan Korba, Director of Student Academic Success Services, who will work as a writing strategist during the retreat.

“Writing can be challenging for anyone; even the most proficient, prolific writers sometimes struggle. The great thing about the faculty writing retreat is that it provides writers with a supportive community of practice, plus the chance to check in with writing strategists about specific writing issues in a relaxed, non-judgmental environment.”

More than 100 Queen’s faculty have participated in this program over the last two years and past participants have reported reaching their writing goals, such as completing research funding applications and finishing manuscripts.

A year later, Adam Szulewski (School of Medicine) says he’s looking forward to taking part the workshop again.

“The writing retreat was a great opportunity for me to have uninterrupted writing time as well as access to URS staff who provided very helpful insight into my grant application. I’m looking forward to more of the same this year,” says Dr. Szulewski.

Registration is currently open to all faculty, and will close on Friday, Dec. 1, or when all available spaces are filled. This is a first come, first served event.

Queen's professor wins national chemical engineering award

Kim McAuley is the first woman to be awarded the D.G. Fisher Award by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

Kim McAuley receiving the D.G. Fisher Award
Kim McAuley, right, Associate Dean of the School Graduate Studies and a professor in chemical engineering, is the first woman to be awarded the D.G. Fisher Award by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering. (Supplied Photo)

Queen’s University professor Kim McAuley has received the D.G. Fisher Award by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering for her major contributions to the systems and control engineering discipline. Dr. McAuley, who is also the associate dean of the Queen’s School of Graduate Studies, is the first woman to receive the award.

“I feel extremely honoured to receive the D.G. Fisher Award,” says Dr. McAuley. “To be recognized alongside some of the discipline's forbearers is a great privilege, particularly David Bacon and Tom Harris, who mentored me early in my career.”

Both Drs. Bacon and Harris are past recipients of the D.G. Fisher Award from Queen’s University.

Systems and control engineering involves the analysis, design, and optimization of complex systems in all sectors, from robotic manufacturing and assembly lines to petrochemical production and metallurgy. Practitioners use mathematical modeling to inform these large-scale industry processes with the aim of increasing efficiency and lowering production costs. In turn, this helps make products more affordable for consumers and lessens negative environmental impacts.

Dr. McAuley has worked with major chemical and polymer companies like ExxonMobil, DuPont and NOVA Chemicals to improve industrial processes, as well as ‘clean tech’ firms looking to transform existing small-scale processes into large-scale operations.

She recently worked with Enviro Innovate, a company based at Queen’s University’s Innovation Park, which has developed a technology that can remove carbon dioxide from industrial furnace emissions, which can then be used as a feedstock for bio-sourced jet fuel or to create new polymers. Dr. McAuley helped the company by modeling the intricacies of carbon dioxide absorption by small water droplets in the process so Enviro Innovate could better explain the causes of their high carbon dioxide removal rates to companies looking to curb their emissions impact.

“I would not have earned this award without the hard work and enthusiasm of my graduate students – both past and present,” says Dr. McAuley, who currently oversees two Queen’s Chemical Engineering doctoral students and six master's students. “Working alongside them has not only helped me progress my research, but our experiences together have increased my awareness of their needs and goals, and have given me an even better understanding of my role as associate dean of Graduate Studies.”

Canadian systems and control experts are respected around the world and Dr. McAuley believes this global leadership in the field will continue to grow.

“I anticipate future winners of the D.G. Fisher award are amongst my colleagues at Queen’s and our students,” she says. “The industry demand for systems and control professionals continues to grow, particularly due to improvements in computing technology, better access to information and easier ways to collaborate internationally.”

Every March, Dr. McAuley co-organizes a multi-institutional systems and control recruitment event for undergraduates contemplating masters degrees followed by a career in systems and control engineering. This spring will mark the fourth annual event, featuring research from 13 experts from six institutions.

Promising cancer research

Caitlin Miron, Queen’s PhD student, presented with the Mitacs PhD Award for Oustanding Innovation by Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development (left) and Jim Banting, Assistant Vice-Principal of Partnerships and Innovation at Queen’s (right).
Caitlin Miron, Queen’s PhD student, presented with the Mitacs PhD Award for Oustanding Innovation by Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development (left) and Jim Banting, Assistant Vice-Principal of Partnerships and Innovation at Queen’s (right).

Queen’s PhD student Caitlin Miron was in the spotlight in Ottawa this week when she was presented with the Mitacs PhD Award for Outstanding Innovation for her work in biochemistry. Ms. Miron, a student with the Department of Chemistry, broke new ground by discovering a DNA binder that can essentially ‘switch off’ cancer cells and prevent them from spreading.

The award is given to a PhD student who has made a significant achievement in research and development innovation during Mitacs-funded research. Ms. Miron’s award is one of seven given annually by Mitacs, a national, not-for-profit organization that works with 60 universities, thousands of companies, and government to support industrial and social innovation in Canada.

Ms. Miron was presented with her award by Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovaton, Science and Economic Development, Kristy Duncan, Minister of Science, and Alejandro Adem, Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director of Mitacs.

Ms. Miron’s research focused on identifying a chemical compound that can bind to a specific form of DNA architecture, which has been found in cancer genes. Preliminary results show the compound can stabilize the DNA and thereby stop the cancer from spreading. This research may be useful in anticancer therapeutic agents, either alone or combined with other treatments. 

“You can think about temporarily single-strand DNA as a necklace. You have a chain, which is your DNA, then you have beads that move freely along that chain until they come to a knot. That knot is a guanine quadruplex, which is an unusual form of DNA. Normally that knot can be unraveled, but if someone has put superglue on it, you can’t unknot it. What we found is essentially an excellent form of superglue,” says Ms. Miron. “We care about this in terms of anti-cancer applications because these quadruplexes often form before sequences of DNA that lead to the development of cancer. If we can stop those beads, which are the cellular machinery that’s going to process that DNA, from accessing it, we can potentially stop various forms of cancer development and metastasis. We have fairly promising results in cancer cell inhibition in this field."

Her findings, researched in collaboration with Dr. Jean-Louis Mergny at the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology in Bordeaux, France, during her Mitacs GlobalLink internship, will be published in January 2018. It is also expected to be ready for licensing by pharmaceutical companies within two to five years.

To learn more about Ms. Miron’s research and to watch a video interview with her, visit the School of Graduate Studies website.

New lecture series to celebrate John Meisel

The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies to hold its inaugural event on Thursday, Nov. 23.

  • The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies was announced during his 94th birthday party at the University Club. Helping unveil the poster were, from left: Keith Banting (Political Studies, Smith School of Business); Barbara Crow, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science; Zsuzsa Csergő, Head, Department of Political Studies; and Tom Hewitt Chief Development Officer, Advancement.
    The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies was announced during his 94th birthday party at the University Club. Helping unveil the poster were, from left: Keith Banting (Political Studies, Smith School of Business); Barbara Crow, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science; Zsuzsa Csergő, Head, Department of Political Studies; and Tom Hewitt Chief Development Officer, Advancement.
  • Professor Emeritus John Meisel reacts to the announcement of The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies. The inaugural visiting scholar, Debra Thompson from the University of Oregon, will host a lecture Thursday, Nov. 23 from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.
    Professor Emeritus John Meisel reacts to the announcement of The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies. The inaugural visiting scholar, Debra Thompson from the University of Oregon, will host a lecture Thursday, Nov. 23 from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.
  • The Queen's community celebrated the 94th birthday of Professor Emeritus John Meisel with a special event Oct. 20 at the University Club.
    The Queen's community celebrated the 94th birthday of Professor Emeritus John Meisel with a special event Oct. 20 at the University Club.

A lot has changed across this country since John Meisel first took up residence here at Queen’s in 1949 as a lecturer in Political Studies. But one thing that remains a constant is the existence of political controversy and the need for scholars, policy makers, and the public to explore and address it.

This is where a new annual lecture series at Queen’s will come in. The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies is set for Thursday, Nov. 23 from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. The inaugural visiting scholar will be Debra Thompson from the University of Oregon and the title of her lecture is “Trump, Race, and Time”.

“This scholar series is an ideal way for the university to celebrate John’s incredible career and the contributions he has made to Queen’s and Canada in his roles as a professor, public servant, and public intellectual,” says Zsuzsa Csergő, Political Studies Department Head. “He was an important voice in many of this country’s most important debates over many decades, including discussions over the future of Canadian culture and arts, and battles over the constitution, to name a few.”

Professor Meisel was also a pioneer in research into political behavior and he wrote widely on Canadian elections, political parties, Quebec politics, science policy, and cultural policy. He was the founding editor of two prestigious academic journals, the Canadian Journal of Political Science and the International Political Science Review. From 1980 to 1983 he was Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and later served as president of the Royal Society of Canada.

Recently he celebrated his 94th birthday at the Queen’s University Club where members of the Political Studies department unveiled the scholar series founded in his honour. The event will also highlight the important contributions of Queen’s Political Studies to scholarship and public engagement both nationally and internationally.

The lecture is open to the public and is being sponsored by the Faculty of Arts and Science with support from alumni.

For more information visit the Queen’s Political Studies website

Gathering new insights

Queen’s researchers receive $3.56 million in Insight grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

A total of 27 Queen’s University researchers have received a combined $3.56 million in research funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight program. The grants, which run between one and five years, serve to support research and research partnerships that will build knowledge and understanding about people, societies and the world by supporting research excellence in all subject areas.

“Queen’s researchers continue to push the envelope in the social sciences, arts, and humanities, pursuing projects that offer the potential for tremendous cultural, social, and economic benefits,” says John Fisher, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “The success of our researchers in obtaining these grants demonstrates the success of Queen’s researchers in addressing the most complex issues facing our society today. I offer my most sincere congratulations, and look forward to witnessing first-hand the success of these initiatives.”

Successful recipients include:

Susan Bartels (Emergency Medicine/Public Health Sciences)

Dr. Bartels proposes an in-depth study of the challenges and life courses of “peace babies” – children born as a result of intimate relations, both consensual and non-consensual, between local women and UN Peacekeepers during the MONUSCO mission in the Congo. Her research will examine the socioeconomic, cultural and security circumstances that lead to the unequal power relationships between peacekeepers and the local population, as well as the life experiences and challenges faced by peace babies and their mothers.

Yolande Chan (Smith School of Business)

Dr. Chan will examine Canadian university entrepreneurship incubators, as well as those in the U.S. and U.K. to determine how to strengthen innovation performance. Her research will look at how digital technology can be used to identify novel ideas or findings stemming from university research and assist incubators in nurturing start-ups with high potential.

Marc Epprecht (Global Development Studies)

Dr. Epprecht aims to reconstruct a social history of the South African municipality of Msunduzi from the late 1950’s through the end of apartheid and into the present day. Msunduzi presents an interesting location to study, as it faces some of the most difficult development challenges in all of South Africa, including high rates of HIV/AIDS, unemployment, crime and poverty. Dr. Epprecht will work in collaboration with leading social historians in the region to promote a deeper understanding of the historical and cultural factors at play.

Mohamed Khimji (Law)

Professor Khimji’s research aims to provide a thorough analysis of shareholder democracy – defined as efforts to promote shareholder participation in corporate governance – in publically-traded Canadian corporations. This project will address the lack of quantitative data on shareholder activism in publicly traded companies in recent decades – examining the extent and effectiveness of activism as a tool in corporate governance.

For more information about the Insight program, visit the website.


Insight Grant Recipients
Stephen Baron (Sociology) $137,471
Susan Bartels (Emergency Medicine/Public Health Sciences) $316,743
Yolande Chan (Smith School of Business) $194,398
Fabio Colivicchi (Classics) $100,000
Christopher Cotton (Economics) $116,924
Peter Dacin (Smith School of Business) $195,980
Evan Dudley (Smith School of Business) $84,971
Marc Epprecht (Global Development Studies) $329,298
Christopher Essert (Law) $85,240
Mohamed Khimji (Law) $155,305
Jean-Baptiste Litrico (Smith School of Business) $124,760
Jeff Masuda (Kinesiology and Health Studies) $236,767
David McDonald (Global Development Studies) $181,909
Allison Morehead (Art History and Art Conservation) $159,344
Morten Nielsen (Economics) $123,805
Susanne Soederberg (Political Studies) $98,460
Wei Wang (Smith School of Business) $70,070

Insight Development Grant Recipients
J. Andrew Grant (Political Studies) $31,547
Gail Henderson (Law) $67,114
Norma Möllers (Sociology) $57,391
Jennifer Tomasone (Kinesiology and Health) $70,267
Benjamin Bolden (Education) $59,972
Theresa Davies (Mechanical and Materials Engineering) $66,000
Sumon Majumdar (Economics) $30,730
Trisha Parsons (Rehabilitation Therapy) $66,383

Partnership Development Grant Recipients
Susan Bartels (Emergency Medicine/Public Health Sciences) $199,930
Christopher DeLuca (Education) $199,950

Challenging today's youth

Queen’s-based PREVNet hosting virtual town hall to empower youth to change the culture of bullying.

PREVNet scientific co-director Wendy Craig is hosting a Youth Town Hall in Ottawa on Wednesday that will also be live on Facebook.

Canadian youth are being challenged to support youth who are being bullied and create solutions for bullying.

Queen’s University researcher Wendy Craig, York University researcher Debra Pepler, and the Queen’s-based Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNet) are hosting a Youth Town Hall to promote discussion around the prevention of bullying. The event will feature virtual and live components on what healthy relationships look like, and how they can be supported. This event is the culmination of PREVNet's Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s Partnership Award, and anyone interested in issues of bullying prevention, wellness and the importance of healthy relationships is encouraged to participate.

The virtual town hall runs Wednesday, Nov. 15 starting at 4:30 pm. Members of the public are encouraged to join the conversation online on Facebook. PREVNet's National Youth Advisory Commitee will also officially launch its public education campaign, #Spreadkindness, about the importance of healthy relationships.

Get Involved
The virtual town hall runs Wednesday, Nov. 15 starting at 4:30 pm. Members of the public are encouraged to join the conversation online on Facebook.

Dr. Craig explains over 100 youth have been invited to the event at the Canadian Museum of History in Ottawa. The event will be moderated by Senator Marc Gold. For 10 years Senator Gold was the chair of ENSEMBLE for the respect of diversity, a not-for-profit organization that works with youth to build a more open and inclusive society.

“It’s absolutely critical that youth lead bullying prevention initiatives and that adults stand behind them,” says PREVNet Co-Director Dr. Craig, one of Canada’s leading bullying prevention advocates. “In 85 per cent of bullying episodes there are other youth there and if they step in within 10 seconds, the bullying stops. Empowering youth to take charge is important and hearing their voices is important.”

PREVNet is Canada’s authority on research and resources for bullying prevention, with a network of 130 leading Canadian research scientists and 60 national youth-serving organizations.

Dr. Debra Pepler, PREVNet’s Scientific Co-Director, outlines a number of challenges that will be addressed at the conference:

  • Canada ranks poorly – 25th of 28 rich countries on the quality of children’s relationships with their parents and peers
  • Canada also ranks poorly on rates of bullying and victimization
  • Bullying leads to genetic changes that result in depression
  • Research shows that the impact of victimization can last over 40 years
  • Involvement in bullying lays the foundation for dating aggression, intimate partner violence, child maltreatment, and workplace bullying
  • Despite 50 per cent reduction in rate of bullying in the past 10 years in Canada, there are still 2 million Canadian school-aged children directly impacted by bullying

“What we are doing is starting to work but there is still work to do,” says Dr. Craig. “This town hall is a unique opportunity to motivate and inspire youth to get involved.”

Five Queen's professors renewed as Canada Research Chairs

Canada Research Chairs program advances the nation’s position as a leader in discovery and innovation.

One of the country’s highest research honours, the Canada Research Chairs program advances the nation’s position as a leader in discovery and innovation and, recently, five Queen’s faculty members were renewed at both Tier 1 and Tier 2 levels. Tier 1 Chairs are recognized by their peers as world leaders in their respective fields, while Tier 2 Chairs are recognized as emerging leaders in their research areas. Queen’s is home to over 40 Canada Research Chairs.

“The Canada Research Chairs Program continues to enlist and retain our country’s best and brightest researchers,” says John Fisher, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “Here at Queen’s we are very proud to have five of our most accomplished researchers renewed as chairs, as it speaks to our institution’s pursuit of excellence and leadership across a variety of disciplines.”

Developed in 2000, each year the CRC program invests up to $300 million to attract and retain some of the world's most accomplished and promising minds. Queen’s will receive $200,000 per year over seven years for each Tier 1 Chair and $100,000 per year over five years for each Tier 2 Chair.

Queen’s renewed CRCs are:

Pascale Champagne (Civil Engineering) has been renewed as a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Bioresource Engineering. A number of Canadian policies have increased incentives for renewable energy generation, bioproduct recovery, and environmentally sustainable approaches to manage water, waste and renewable resources. Dr. Champagne’s research aims to enhance our fundamental understanding of how to lessen environmental impacts of technologies associated with this effort, as well as to use ‘green chemistry’ to establish a future supply of sustainable bio-based energy, fuel material and chemical products.

Will Kymlicka (Philosophy) has been renewed as a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Political Philosophy. Citizenship is often described as tracking social membership but, according to Dr. Kymlicka, many members of society are denied full citizenship based on their linguistic or cognitive capacities. His research will explore new concepts of inclusive citizenship that seek to enable the voices and participation of all members.

Warren Mabee (Geography and Planning) has been renewed as a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Renewable Energy Development and Implementation. Dr. Mabee evaluates new renewable energy technologies in terms of their economic, social, and environmental performance, and seeks to create tools to link national and regional energy modeling with local initiatives. Ultimately, his research supports increased renewable energy use across Canada.

Morten Nielsen (Economics) has been renewed as a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Time Series Econometrics. Dr. Nielsen’s research develops new and improved statistical methods for analyzing time-series data. Such methods are widely used in applied macro-economics, financial economics,
and many other fields.

R. Kerry Rowe (Civil Engineering) has been renewed as a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering. The prevention of groundwater contamination at landfill and mining sites is a critical environmental issue. Dr. Rowe’s research will combine modeling and experimental data to investigate long-term performance of various landfill liner systems, and provide new guidelines for the design of anti-contamination systems for future landfills and mining operations.

For more information on Queen’s CRC holders and the program, visit the website.

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