Department of History

Department of History
Department of History

Spring/Summer Courses 2021

Please note that HIST 125, HIST 260 and HIST 270 are offered online through Arts and Science Online but HIST 242, 449/802, and 471 are courses offered through the History Department

100 Level Spring/Summer Courses (S/S) 6.0 units

HIST 125   The Evolution of Modern Europe (ASO)
Instructor: Leonid Trofimov

A survey of Western and Central Europe and Great Britain from about 1750 to 1950. The focus is on the revolutions which produced modern Europe, notably the political revolutions (1789 and 1848), industrialization, urbanization, population growth, secularization, the rise of new classes, and changes in ideologies and popular attitudes. Click here for more information.    

6.0 units

 

200 Level Spring/Summer Courses (S/S) 3.0 or 6.0 units

HIST 242   Policing Canada: A Cultural-Political History of Security and Surveillance 
Instructor:  Max Hamon 

The police in Canada are often linked to the benevolent and law-upholding image of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. And yet in the post-9/11 and Edward Snowdon era, the role that the state plays in securing and supervising its citizens has drawn increasing public criticism. Moreover, as Canada struggles to come to terms with ongoing discrimination against Indigenous peoples by security forces, the role of the police in Canada has come under increasing scrutiny. Studying the history of policing will shed light on these issues and provide a better understanding of the cultural and political history of Canada more generally. In this course students will meet agents of the state: border guards, municipal constables, secret agents, and police administrators. They will consider how society responded, and see how groups resisted efforts to police them, including the plains Cree and other Indigenous peoples in the 19th century and the Mohawks of Oka in the 20th, striking workers, immigrants, the unemployed, feminists, LGBTQ individuals and university students. Key topics include municipal policing, border control, Indigenous resistance, cold war spies, and terrorism. Finally, Students will be asked to consider arguments for and against the increasing role played by the police in the “Peace, Order and Good Government” of Canada.

3.0 units

HIST 260   Canada from Conquest to the Present (ASO)
Instructor: TBD

An introduction to some of the major themes in the social, cultural, economic and political history of Canada. Click here for more information.   

6.0 units

HIST 270   Contemporary China (ASO)
Instructor: TBD

"Contemporary China” aims to place the dynamics of recent social and economic change in historical perspective. Proceeding both thematically and chronologically, it familiarizes students with the deep continuities associated with phenomena such as urbanization, environmental challenges, cultural expectations and gender norms. China’s political system will also be examined analytically to provide students with a good grasp of its evolution and distinctive features. Click here for more information.

3.0 units

 

Upper Year Seminar Spring/Summer Courses (S/S) 4.5 units

HIST 449 / 812 S Topics in Medieval Mediterranean History: Messiahs, Mystics, and Martyrs in Muslim and Jewish Religious Culture
Instructor: Adnan Husain/Howard Adelman

This course explores the interplay or “symbiosis” between Jews and Muslims, Judaism and Islam, to understand the religious identities and cultures of both and their mutual development rom the time of Muhammad to the mysterious messiah and convert to Islam Sabbatai Zvi in the 17th century Ottoman empire.  Among the key topics discussed are religious dissent, sectarianism, conversion, polemics, politics, power, plague/pandemic, the treatment of religious minorities, and apocalyptic or messianic movements across the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean world. The course explores shared intellectual movements in philosophy, theology, and mysticism while investigating the tensions between traditional and text based authority and popular rebellious movements based on charismatic leaders.

4.5 units

HIST 471 Power and Knowledge: Foucault for Historians
Instructor: Steven Maynard

You’ve likely heard him mentioned in lectures or quoted in readings. Maybe you’ve read some of his work. Michel Foucault is one of the most frequently cited authors in the humanities. His impact on a wide range of disciplines is profound. But who was Foucault and why should you care? In this seminar, we will explore how Foucault intervened in many different historical fields, including madness and medicine, prison and punishment, sexuality and the self. We will also look at how historians have made use of Foucault’s ‘toolkit’ – concepts such as biopower and governmentality – in their own research and writing. Our aim will be to examine how historians have adapted, elaborated, and critiqued Foucault, notably in the areas of gender, race, and colonialism. We will track Foucault’s changing conceptualizations of power and knowledge, and we will consider what we might learn from Foucault in terms of the politics of doing history and thinking otherwise.

In terms of format, this is a seminar course. For each historical subject or concept we take up, we will read Foucault and pair him with the work of several historians who engage Foucault on the same topic. There will be occasional mini-lectures by the instructor, but, in the spirit of Foucault, who much preferred the collective work of the seminar over the lecture, our primary mode will be intensive seminar discussion.

4.5 units