Indigenous Researchers at Queen's University

Queen's University aims to support ethical research with Indigenous communities and Peoples. There are several Indigenous-led research projects ongoing at Queen's University. Use this directory to discover Indigenous Researchers, their areas of research and contact information.

Karine

Karine Bertrand

Film and Media
Web page:

Karine Bertrand is an assistant professor of Film Studies from French Canadian and Indigenous ancestry (Maniwaki-Kitigan Zibi). Her research centers around Indigenous Cinemas and television series (Americas, Australia and New Zealand) Québec cinema (migrant identities and Quebec filmmakers in Hollywood) and Road Movies from around the world. Other areas of interest include: American popular culture, Indigenous poetry and oral tradition, the role of letter writing and sharing in documentary and fiction films and post-memory and film. She is particularly interested in the representation of women in road movies and in the films of Quebec migrants (women filmmakers). Her present research focuses more precisely on Indigenous women’s cinema in Canada, including the Inuit collective Arnait Video Productions and the Wapikoni Mobile project. Beyond her research, she enjoys spending as much time as possible outside (hiking, canoeing, skiing, walking, gardening, doing yoga) connecting to the land and learning about nature’s medicines.

Affiliation:
Nathan

Nathan Brinklow Thanyehténhas

Lecturer
Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Web page:

Thanyehténhas (Nathan Brinklow) is Turtle Clan from the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. He grew up without the language in a community that had largely lost its heritage language as an everyday spoken language.  Nathan’s interest in the language was sparked through the “Mohawk Hymns” he sang with his grandmother as a young man and following his formal studies, he went on to study at Shatiwennakará:tats, the intensive adult language program at Tyendinaga.  He now teaches in that program.

Research interests: Mohawk language & culture, learning language through culture,  Adult second language acquisition, traditional Mohawk belief & spirituality

Affiliation:
[photo of Peggy Dejong]

Peggy Dejong

Assistant Professor
School of Medicine
Faculty of Health Sciences
Phone: 613-549-6666#3225

Dr. Peggy DeJong received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Waterloo and her medical degree from Queen’s University. Her clinical training consisted of Internal Medicine and Cardiology at Queen’s University. She completed an additional year at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital in echocardiography. She joined the Division of Cardiology at Queen’s University in 2014.

Dr. DeJong’s chief academic interest is medical education. She is working on a Masters in Medical Education from Dundee University, Scotland (supported by the Department of Medicine, Queen’s University). She is also working on the development of Competency Based Medical Education curriculum and assessments for the Cardiology training program at Queen’s University. She was the Director or the Adult Cardiology Training program at Queen’s University from 2015-2019. She now serves as the CBME lead for the Adult Cardiology training program.

Affiliation:
[photo of Armand Ruffo]

Armand Garnet Ruffo

Associate Professor
Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Faculty of Arts and Science
Web page:

Professor in the Department of English and cross-appointed with the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. His scholarly and creative work—strongly influenced by his Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) heritage—sheds light on contemporary Indigenous issues such as the environment, spirituality, incarceration and self-determination.

Affiliation:
[photo of Mark Green]

Mark Green

Professor, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering

Dr. Mark Green, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), former Professor and Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment) of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, is interested in the structural performance in fire of concrete structures, applications of fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) in structures, the effects of cold regions on concrete structures, and monitoring of structures.  In particular, he has conducted extensive research over the past ten years on the fire resistance of FRP strengthening concrete structures. He has also examined the effects of cold regions on FRP strengthened concrete structures. He is currently researching methods for monitoring concrete bridges at low temperatures, fire resistance of FRP strengthened concrete structures, new self-healing materials for waterproofing concrete structures, FRPs for advanced rapid transit systems, and the fire performance of buildings constructed with sustainable concretes. The dynamics of bridge structures and the performance of bridge expansion joints are also topics of interest. He is a member of Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte and an advisor to the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science on the development of an Aboriginal Access to Engineering Program.

Affiliation:
Karen Lawford

Karen Lawford

Assistant Professor
Department of Gender Studies
Faculty of Arts and Science
Web page:

Dr. Karen Lawford (Ph.D., R.M., A.M.) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies. She is the first registered midwife and Indigenous midwife in Canada to obtain a doctoral degree and hold a university appointment. She advocates for maternity care that allows community members to give birth in their communities and on the land, and has explored the resiliency and resistance of women evacuated from their communities for birth. She is a founding member of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives.

Dr. Lawford mentors undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students. Her growing recognition nationally and internationally as an expert in her field recently led her to be named Co-Chair of the 2019 conference for the International Health Workforce Collaborative. Dr. Lawford continues to work with Indigenous midwives in Canada, the USA, and New Zealand, with plans for forming relationships in Australia.

Affiliation:
Lindsay Morcom

Lindsay Morcom

Assistant Professor
Faculty of Education
Web page:

Dr. Lindsay Morcom is an interdisciplinary researcher with experience in education, Aboriginal languages, language revitalization, and linguistics.  She earned her Master’s degree in Linguistics at First Nations University through the University of Regina in 2006.  She then completed her doctorate in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University in 2010.  From 2014-2019 she coordinated the campus-based and community-based iterations Aboriginal Teacher Education Program at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.  During this time she was also a professor in the Faculty of Education.  She is now an associate professor and Canada Research Chair in Language Revitalization and Decolonizing Education.  She is of Anishinaabe heritage and is a member of Ardoch Algonquin First Nation.

Affiliation:
[Dylan Robinson]

Dylan Robinson

Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair
Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Faculty of Arts and Science
Web page:

Dr. Dylan Robinson’s research expertise includes Indigenous music and sound studies, Indigenous art (particularly Indigenous public art), and critical-creative forms of writing. Each of these areas is reflected in his book Hungry Listening: Resonant Theory for Indigenous Sound Studies published in 2020 with University of Minnesota Press (https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/hungry-listening). His previous publications include the edited collections Music and Modernity among First Peoples of North America (2019) co-edited with Victoria Levine, and Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action in and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2016), co-edited with Keavy Martin. With Candice Hopkins, he is the curator of the internationally touring exhibition, Soundings. Dr. Robinson’s current work focuses on the life of Indigenous song and artistic forms of repatriation. This work is situated in the context of the museum as a space of incarceration, where Indigenous ancestors reside on display or “in storage”, and seeks to understand how artistic processes and interventions within this space offer strategies for reconnection between kin and forms of freedom.

Affiliation:
[Mary Smith photo]

Mary Smith

Assistant Professor
School of Nursing
Faculty of Health Sciences
Phone: 613-533-6000x74309

Assistant Professor within the School of Nursing. Areas of interest include supporting accessibility to education through innovative synchronous and asynchronous technologies. Research areas in the areas of Indigenous health care and nurse practitioner pedagogy within First Nations communities. Additionally, Mary focuses on equitable health care and education, her unfolding dissertation research has focused on a unique methodology arising within the context of Chronic Kidney Disease, dialysis and organ donation in a First Nation community. 

Affiliation:
Bob

Bob Watts

Adjunct Professor
School of Policy Studies
Faculty of Arts and Science

Bob Watts has been involved in many major Indigenous issues in Canada over the past 20 years and led the process, with support from across Canada and internationally, to establish Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which is examining and will make recommendations regarding the Indian Residential School era and its legacy.

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