Kingston Conference on International Security

Kingston Conference on

International Security

Kingston Conference on

International Security

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KCIS 2018 web banner | 11-13 June 2018

Holiday Inn, Kingston Waterfront Hotel
2 Princess Street, Kingston, ON

DON'T MISS OUT - REGISTER NOW!

General Registration: $400.00 pp + HST
Student Registration: $50.00 pp + HST

​Included in Registration:

  • Opening and Reception at Fort Frontenac
  • Full two-day conference program
  • All breakfasts, coffee breaks and lunch events for 2 days
  • Conference Networking Dinner

 


THEME

What are the implications of re-emphasizing deterrence in defence policy? What is the appropriate balance of capabilities and political commitments to restore a credible defence posture while keeping the door open for constructive dialogue with Moscow and Beijing?

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In Western Europe, NATO’s defence capabilities must be able to both deter adversaries and reassure allies. Canada, along with the US, Germany and the UK, have become lead nation for one of the four battlegroups in the Baltics and Poland. Yet even with NATO’s enhanced forward presence, it is not yet clear what deterrence will entail: is it a return to the Cold War or is deterrence in a more hybrid conflict environment fundamentally different? What is the respective importance of conventional forces, nuclear weapons and missile defence in upholding deterrence and reassurance?

Since the Euromaidan revolution in Ukraine and the annexation of Crimea in 2014, deterrence has made a comeback for the West in general and NATO in particular. To be sure, deterrence was always central to the transatlantic security architecture during the Cold War. In the post-Cold War era, out-of-area operations and security cooperation with partner nations captured the attention of Western armed forces, with a concomitant decline in the centrality of deterrence as a theoretical and policy concept. With the transformation of great-power politics in the last decade, however, we have seen the re-emergence of deterrence in Western policy as the United States and its allies are increasingly confronted with challenges in relations with both the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China.

Join us as we examine the evolving role and force posture of Canada, the United States and its allies in both Europe and the Asia-Pacific with regards to conventional deterrence, [cyber deterrence, gray-zone deterrence], missile defence and nuclear deterrence.  Sessions include the history and theory of deterrence; the relationship between reassurance and deterrence; conventional deterrence in a number of regional contexts, including Europe and Northeast Asia; the future of nuclear deterrence, including missile defence.

AGENDA

Expand to view the full agenda for MONDAY, 11 JUNE - WEDNESDAY, 13 JUNE, 2018

MONDAY, 11 JUNE 2018

FORT FRONTENAC, Ontario Street, Kingston

Time

Event

Location

1730-2200

  Conference Opening and Reception

 Officers' Mess

1815
 

  Welcome and Opening Remarks
      Major-General Simon Hetherington, Commander, Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Centre

 Officers' Mess
 

 

TUESDAY, 12 JUNE 2018

HOLIDAY INN KINGSTON WATERFRONT, 2 Princess Street, Kingston - 6th Floor Conference Venue

Time

Event

Location

0700

  Breakfast

 Islandview Ballroom

0730

  Registration

 6th Floor Foyer

0830
 

  Welcome and Introductions
      Major-General Simon Hetherington, Commander, Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Centre

 Bellevue Ballroom

0845-0945

  Challenge to the Conference
      Lieutenant-General Stephen Bowes, Commander Canadian Joint Operations Command

 Bellevue Ballroom

0945

  BREAK

 Islandview Ballroom

1015-1200

PANEL 1: THE FOUNDATIONS OF DETERRENCE

Deterrence has served as the underlying basis for the defense of the West since the development of the atomic bomb and the foundation of NATO in the late 1940s. The foundations established in the early Cold War have influenced force structure decisions, policy positions, and diplomatic behavior between potential antagonists in Europe, South Asia, the Middle East, and East Asia. In the post-Cold War environment, deterrence theory has moved away from the nuclear dimension but extended deterrence is still central, wherein a third party provides security guarantees for a second party against a first party. Extended deterrence is a concept fraught with challenges of credibility, but is better than most conceivable alternatives for keeping global conflict at bay. What is deterrence theory? Why is deterrence still relevant today? How is deterrence applied in practice and what are the observable effects? What is the role of extended deterrence? How do the key threads of these concepts carry through to today's international security environment?

     Chaired by: Dr. Jeffrey Larsen, US Naval Postgraduate School

     Amy Woolf, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress
     Dr. Jacek Durkalec, Center for Global Security Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
     Paul Bernstein, Center for the Study of Weapons of Mass Destruction, National Defense University

 Bellevue Ballroom

1200-1300

  LUNCH

 Islandview Ballroom

1300-1500
 

PANEL 2: NATO'S DEFENCE AND DETERRENCE DEBATES

This panel will examine the evolution of NATO's deterrence and defence strategies, with a focus on conventional deterrence and Enhanced Forward Presence. How do these forward-deployed forces support broader deterrence and defence objectives for the Alliance? What is the continued relevance of NATO's missile defence and nuclear sharing arrangements? What is the appropriate mix of capabilities? What is animating the current deterrence debate?

     Chaired by: Professor Stephanie Carvin, Carleton University

     Dr. John Deni, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College
     Professor Stéfanie von Hlatky, Centre for International and Defence Policy, Queen's University
     Dr. Alexander Lanoszka, City, University of London/University of Waterloo

 Bellevue Ballroom

1500

  BREAK

 Islandview Ballroom

1530-1630
 

  KEYNOTE ADDRESS ON DETERRENCE-US CIVILIAN POLICY PERSPECTIVE
      M. Elaine Bunn, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear and Missile Defense Policy, US

 Belleview Ballroom

1800

  NETWORKING / CONFERENCE DINNER

     Boarding at Confederation Basin Dock

 Kingston 1000 Islands Cruises

 

WEDNESDAY, 13 JUNE 2018

HOLIDAY INN KINGSTON WATERFRONT, 2 Princess Street, Kingston - 6th Floor Conference Venue

Time

Event

Location

0700

  Breakfast

 Islandview Ballroom

0815

  Welcome and Announcements

 Bellevue Ballroom

0830

  KEYNOTE ADDRESS

     Major General Edward F. Dorman lll, Director J4, CENTCOM, US Army

 Bellevue Ballroom

0915-1045

PANEL 3: THE EVOLVING CHARACTER OF DETERRENCE

Warfare has changed since the Cold War, introducing new options for aggressors as well as new frontiers to be defended. This panel will explore how the current understanding of emerging concepts such as cyber warfare, space warfare, information warfare, and political warfare can change the way we think about deterrence. How do these changes affect deterrence? How do these new concepts in warfare affect NATO and NATO members' ability to deter aggression?

     Chaired by: Brigadier-General Derek Basinger, Force Development, Canadian Armed Forces

     Kristin Bruusgaard, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University
     Professor Cori E. Dauber, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
     Colonel Walter Wood, Acting Director General, Cyberspace, Canadian Armed Forces

 Bellevue Ballroom

1045

  BREAK

 Islandview Ballroom

1115-1245

BREAKOUT PANEL 4A: DETERRENCE IN ASIA

The deterrence debate highlights the importance of contextual considerations to effectively deter an adversary. What are the unique challenges and opportunities associated with deterring threats from North Korea, China and India/Pakistan? Does Asia provide an alternative model for extended deterrence?

     Chaired by: Professor Douglas Lovelace, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College

     Dr. David Lai, Asian Security Affairs, US Army War College
     Dr. Jae Ku, US-Korea Institute, John Hopkins SAIS 
     Dr. C. Christine Fair, Security Studies Program, Georgetown University

 Islandview Ballroom

1115-1245

BREAKOUT PANEL 4B: DETERRENCE ON NATO'S SOUTHERN FLANK

This panel will look at the unique challenges and opportunities associated with deterring threats from Iran, and Violent Extremists, and examine NATO's interest and potential role in deterring them. What should NATO's role be in facilitating that deterrence?

     Chaired by: Professor William Braun lll, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College

     Dr. Chris Bolan, Middle East Security Studies, US Army War College
     Dr. Phil Williams, Ridgway Center, University of Pittsburgh
     Dr. Chloe Berger, Middle East Faculty, NATO Defense College

 Bellevue Ballroom

1245-1345

  LUNCH (War on the Rocks Bombshell Podcast)

 Islandview Ballroom

1345-1515

PANEL 5: DETERRENCE POLICY AND MILITARY STRATEGY

What policy implications does the return of deterrence in its many forms, old and new, have for the United States, Canada and their NATO allies in Europe? How should military strategy be shaped in an era when the need to deter adversaries includes nuclear, conventional and cyber threats to national interests? This session will draw on the lessons suggested by the conference panels to put forward concrete suggestions for the structure and posture of western armed forces in the decade ahead to maximize their deterrent capabilities against a wide range of threats.

     Chaired by: Professor Kim Richard Nossal, Centre for International and Defence Policy, Queen's University

     Professor Steve Saideman, Carleton University
     Loren DeJonge Schulman, Center for a New American Security
     Dr. Hugh White, Australian National University

 Bellevue Ballroom

1515

  BREAK

 Islandview Ballroom

1530-1615

  KEYNOTE ADDRESS
     Introduction by Professor Kim Richard Nossal, Queen's University

     Gordon Venner, Associate Deputy Minister, Department of National Defence

 Belleview Ballroom

1615

  CLOSING REMARKS

     Professor Douglas Lovelace, Director SSI, US Army War College

 Belleview Ballroom

 

 

KCIS Sponsors: Canadian Army, Centre for International and Defence Policy, Strategic Studies Institute-USAWC, NATO Defense College
KCIS is a partnership between the Centre for International and Defence Policy at Queen's University; the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Centre; the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College; and the NATO Defense College, Rome.