Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Subscribe to RSS - Math Club

Math Club

Math Club - Troy Day (Queen's University)

Thursday, March 12th, 2020

Time:  5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 118

Speaker:  Troy Day (Queen's University)

Title:  What does the equation $e^{-2x}=1-x$ have to do with epidemiology?

Abstract: An important goal of epidemiology is to predict the spread of infectious diseases. We will see how relatively simple mathematical models are used to generate such predictions, as well as how they are used to guide public health interventions.

Math Club - Anup Dixit (Queen's University)

Thursday, March 5th, 2020

Time:  5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 118

Speaker:  Anup Dixit (Queen's University)

Title:  Buffon’s needle problem.

Abstract: In 1734, Buffon asked the following question: If a needle is dropped onto a floor made of parallel wooden planks, what is the probability that it will cross one of the cracks between the planks?

In this talk, we will answer Buffon's question and indicate how it can be used to approximate the value of $\pi$. We will also discuss a few variations of this problem.

Math Club - Jamie Mingo (Queen's University)

Thursday, February 27th, 2020

Time:  5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 118

Speaker:  Jamie Mingo (Queen's University)

Title:  Random Walks and a Truncation of Pascal's Triangle.

Abstract: Pascal's triangle has long been used for counting combinatorial objects like random walks. A random walk means that we move on some kind of grid and at each tick of the clock we take a step in a random direction.

We will see how we can use a truncation of Pascal's triangle to count walks that return their starting point on some high dimensional trees. We shall also see how this can be done in fractional dimensions.

Math Club - Atabey Kaygun

Thursday, February 13th, 2020

Time: 5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 110

Speaker: Atabey Kaygun

Title: Can one summarize a text without reading it?

Abstract: There is an area of research that lies in the intersection of graph theory, linear algebra, probability, (discrete) stochastic processes, linguistics, literature, history and many areas in humanities.

This talk will be a leisurely excursion into this type of mathematics with examples from ongoing research. As a fun example, I will also demonstrate how one can summarize a text without actually reading it.

Math Club - Francesco Cellarosi (Queen's University)

Thursday, February 6th, 2020

Time: 5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 110

Speaker: Francesco Cellarosi (Queen's University)

Title: Breaking the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus?

Abstract: In this talk we will ‘challenge’ the statement of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus for the Riemann integral by constructing:

  • a function $g$ such that $G(x)=\int_0^x g(t)dt$ exists for all $x\in\mathbb R$ but $G$ is not differentiable at many points.
  • a differentiable function $F$ such that $\int_0^x F’(t)dt\neq F(x)-F(0)$.

To do so, we will use some ill-behaved functions constructed by B. Riemann and V. Volterra.

Math Club - Ivan Dimitrov (Queen's University)

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Time: 5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 319

Speaker: Ivan Dimitrov (Queen's University)

Title: Proof of the Sensitivity Conjecture.

Abstract:  Last year Hao Huang proved that, if $P$ is a set of $2^{n-1} +1$ vertices of an n-dimensional cube, it contains a vertex with at least $\sqrt{n}$ neighbours in $P$. This settled the nearly 30-year old Sensitivity Conjecture. I will present Huang’s proof and show that the estimate $\sqrt{n}$ is sharp.

Math Club - Francesco Cellarosi (Queen's University)

Thursday, April 4th, 2019

Time: 5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 118

Speaker: Francesco Cellarosi (Queen's University)

Title: The irrationality of $\zeta(3)$.

Abstract:  This talk will discuss the famous theorem by R. Apéry who showed in 1978 that $\zeta(3)$ is irrational.
We will see a proof of this fact, due to F. Beuker in 1979, which only uses calculus.

Math Club - Ivan Dimitrov (Queen's University)

Thursday, March 21st, 2019

Time: 5:30 - 6:30 p.m Place: Jeffery Hall 118

Speaker: Ivan Dimitrov (Queen's University)

Title: Why 0.499999999992646 does not equal 12.

Abstract:  We will see why

  • $\int_{0}^\infty \frac{\sin x}{x} \,dx = \pi/2,$
  • $\int_{0}^\infty \frac{\sin x}{x} \cdot \frac{\sin x/3}{x/3}\, dx = \pi/2, $

… and so on all the way to

  • $\int_{0}^\infty \frac{\sin x}{x} \cdot \frac{\sin x/3}{x/3} \cdots \frac{\sin x/13}{x/13}\, dx = \pi/2, $

However,

  • $\int_{0}^\infty \frac{\sin x}{x} \cdot \frac{\sin x/3}{x/3} \cdots \frac{\sin x/13}{x/13} \cdot \frac{\sin x/15}{x/15} \,dx < \pi/2, $

Pages