Department of Political Studies

Department of Political Studies
Department of Political Studies

Linda Mussell

PhD Candidate Linda MussellPhD Candidate
MA Public Policy, BA Political Science (Simon Fraser University)
Supervisor: Margaret Little

Department of Political Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B300
Fax: (613) 533-6848
linda.mussell@queensu.ca
Connect with Linda on LinkedIn


Research Interests

Critical policy analysis; justice systems; imprisonment; intersectionality; GBA+

Brief Biography

Linda is a Pierre Elliot Trudeau Foundation Scholar and a Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholar in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University. Her dissertation research features intersectional policy analysis of intergenerational incarceration in countries grappling with the legacies of colonialism. The purpose of this research is to trace the evolution of policy in the case countries, to examine how/if policies are accounting for effects on families and intergenerational cycles, and to present policy solutions and best practices. She is committed to decolonializing research and centering the experiences of those most directly impacted in her work.

Linda’s doctoral work builds on her experiences volunteering in the justice-involved community and prior research on the justice system. Her master’s research entailed policy analysis of strength-based policy interventions to promote the resilience and long-term wellbeing of children with incarcerated parents in British Columbia. She also has researched self-represented litigation in British Columbia with Legal Aid BC (2015), dangerous offender designation and emotion in Canada (2017-present), and carceral-capital-charity symbiosis (2019-present). Linda is committed to not only advancing research, but also community engagement and service. In addition to serving extensively in student-led initiatives, department committees, and university level committee work, she also volunteers with multiple justice-focused organizations.

For more on Linda’s research, listen to her January 7, 2020 interview on Queen’s Grad Chat.

Selected Awards

  • SSHRC Connection Grant (2020-2021) with Lisa Guenther and Brenda Longfellow
  • Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Scholarship (2019-2022)
  • Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship (2017-2020)
  • Graduate Award, Queen’s University (2016-2020)
  • Graduate Fellowship and Entrance Scholarship, Simon Fraser University (2014-2015)

Selected Publications

Mussell, L. (2020). Intergenerational Imprisonment: Resistance and Resilience in Indigenous Communities. Law and Social Policy, 33: 15-37.

Mussell, L. (2019). After the Prison Closes: Seeking Healing, Memory and Awareness at P4W. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 28(1): 66-73.

Mussell, L. (2019). Lessons from Reanalyzing Research on Children with Incarcerated Parents using Intersectionality-Based Policy Analysis. Queen's Policy Review, 10(10): 28-44.

Hankivsky, O. & Mussell, L. (2018). Gender-Based Analysis Plus (+) in Canada: The Problems and Possibilities of Integrating Intersectionality. Canadian Public Policy, 44(4): 303-316.

Mussell, L. (2016). Kids on the Outside: Policy Options for Youth of Incarcerated Parents in British Columbia. Thesis. Burnaby, BC: Simon Fraser University.

Op-Eds

Mussell, L., & Paynter, M. (Oct. 15, 2020). Worsening conditions in prisons during COVID-19 further marginalize criminalized women. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/the-new-normal-in-prisons-during-covid-19-further-marginalizes-criminalized-women-147454.

Mussell, L., Piché, J., & Walby, K. (Sept. 25, 2020). As the 2020 KP Tour season closes, change is needed. Kingstonist. https://www.kingstonist.com/culture/opinion/opinion-as-the-2020-kp-tour-season-closes-change-is-needed/.

Hunter-Young, N., Mussell, L. & Paynter, M. (July 6, 2020). “If Canada is serious about confronting systemic racism, we must abolish prisons.” The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/if-canada-is-serious-about-confronting-systemic-racism-we-must-abolish-prisons-141408

Mussell, L., Piché, J., & Walby, K. (March 19, 2020). Public consultation needed on multi-year use of KP. Kingstonist. https://www.kingstonist.com/culture/opinion/letter-public-consultation-needed-on-multi-year-use-of-kp/.

Orsini, M. & Mussell, L. (Sept. 16, 2019). Felicity Huffman: White is the colour of remorse. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/felicity-huffman-white-is-the-colour-of-remorse-123647.

Mussell, L. (Sept. 3, 2019). A prison is no place for a party. The Conversation. http://theconversation.com/a-prison-is-no-place-for-a-party-120320.

Conferences

Papers accepted by the Canadian Political Science Association (London, Ont., May 2020), Abolition Convergence (Toronto, May 2020), and International Political Science Association (Portugal, July 2020), but the events were cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19.

Mussell, L. (Nov. 9, 2019). Children of Incarcerated Parents – The best interests of the child and the current Canadian landscape. Presented at the 2019 Canadian Criminal Justice Association Congress, Quebec City, Quebec.

Mussell, L. (Sept. 20, 2019). Unpacking Intergenerational Incarceration in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Paper presented at Building Abolition: A Critical Prison Studies Conference, Banff, Alberta.

Mussell, L. & Orsini, M. (June 2019). Governing Through Emotion: The Discursive Framing of Dangerous Offenders in Canada. Paper presented at the 2019 International Public Policy Conference (ICCP4), Montreal, Quebec.

Mussell, L. & Orsini, M. (June 2019). Governing Through Emotion: The Discursive Framing of Dangerous Offenders in Canada. Paper presented at the 2019 Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association, Vancouver, BC.

Mussell, L. (Aug. 29, 2018). Intergenerational Incarceration in Canada and Beyond. Paper presented at the Waitangi Tribunal’s Monthly Research Series, Wellington, New Zealand.

Hankivsky, O., & Mussell, L. (July 23, 2018). A Four-Country Comparison of the Second Generation of Gender Mainstreaming. Paper presented at the 2018 Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA), Brisbane, Australia.                                                                                             

Mussell, L. (June 1, 2018). Intergenerational Incarceration, Indigenous Communities, and the TRC. Paper presented at the 2018 Congress of the Canadian Political Science Association, Regina, SK.                      

Mussell, L. (Mar. 11, 2018). Intergenerational Incarceration, Indigenous Communities, and the TRC. Paper presented at the Indigenous and Postcolonial Perspectives Conference, Royal Military College, Kingston, ON.

Hankivsky, O. & Mussell, L. (June 30, 2017). Gender-Based Analysis Plus: Beyond an Additive Approach. Paper presented at the International Conference on Public Policy (ICPP3), Singapore.

Hankivsky, O. & Mussell, L. (Mar. 11, 2017). Gender Based Analysis Plus in Canada. Paper presented at the 2017 Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s Conference (FLSQ), Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.     

Invited Speaker

Mussell, L. (Sept 26, 2019). Changing lives: The how and why initiatives like JustKids work. Invited speaker at Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver’s 80th AGM, Vancouver, BC.

Mussell, L. (Aug. 29, 2018). Intergenerational Incarceration in Canada and Beyond. Invited speaker at the Waitangi Tribunal’s Monthly Research Series, Wellington, New Zealand.

Teaching Fellowships

POLS 483 Justice and Gender - Carceral Policy in Post-Colonial States (Winter 2020)

POLS 483 is intended to deepen student interest and knowledge of policy machineries, specifically justice and corrections policies, and their implications for differentially situated people in colonial/post-colonial states. This course introduces students to understanding policy in the conventional way. It then goes deeper to understand more hidden impacts and legacies. We will note intersectional impacts including along factors of gender, racialization and Indigeneity, age, ability, health, location, class, and more. We will examine justice and corrections policy specifically in states grappling with colonial legacies, namely Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. The intended outcome of this course is for students to gain critical thinking and writing skills, and practice concrete skills (e.g., pitches, policy briefs, grant writing, presentations) for future academic pursuits and/or employment after graduation.

POLS 457 Issues in Global Justice: Convergence, Diffusion and Transfer (Winter 2021)

Colonization has created ongoing and lasting impacts in countries and nations around the world, including shaping and influencing justice systems and government practices of punishment, confinement, and criminalization. This course critically explores multiple theories of how and why justice policy convergence, transfer, and diffusion occur between and among several states in the Global North and the Global South. The range of topics examined in this course include colonization and the imposition of English common law justice systems in over a dozen states, the marketing and sale of justice programs across national borders, the provision of corrections/prisons during UN Peace Keeping (e.g., in Haiti), the practice of overseas detention centres (e.g., Guantanamo Bay), and the detention of migrants and asylum seekers.