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Future skills and innovation

Future skills and innovation

[Dr. Amer Johri]
June 1, 2017

Queen's researcher Amer Johri, an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, founder and Director of the Cardiovascular Imaging Network at Queen’s (CINQ), and a practicing cardiologist, is attracting national and international attention for his research into ultrasound techniques.

[Photo of birds credit: Philina English]
October 1, 2016

Students and researchers have used Queen’s University Biological Station (QUBS), covering 3,400 hectares of dense forests and lakes north of Kingston, as a resource for 70 years.

[Alice Vibert Douglas and colleagues at Yerkes Observatory, Chicago, 1925 (Queen's University Archives)]
October 1, 2016

One of the oldest universities in Canada, research at Queen's University has left an indelible mark on the Canadian, and international, landscape of scholarly progress.

Dr. Heather Jamieson samples soil near the Giant Mine in Yellowknife]
October 1, 2016

Queen’s made significant and successful efforts to attract women researchers to campus through the 1980s, including through such programs as the Queen’s National Scholar Program.

[welding image]
October 1, 2016

When it comes to commercializing research, Queen’s has long been a leader among Canadian universities with the establishment of Innovation Park and the Office of Partnerships and Innovation.

[photo of student research from University Archives]
October 1, 2016

Today, with more than 120 programs, graduate and undergraduate education and research at Queen’s has spread to all corners of campus in all disciplines.

[Dr. Parvin Mousavi and Layan Nahlawi in lab]
June 1, 2016

Queen's researcher Parvin Mousavi, professor in the School of Computing, discusses the ways of turning vast amounts of data available from medical imaging and analysis in the form of temporal ultrasound data into clinical progress with procedures such as needle insertion.

[illustration by Carl Wiens]
April 1, 2016

Science journalist Ivan Semeniuk retraces the history of Canada’s Nobel Prize-winning physics experiment led by Queen's researcher Arthur McDonald.

[ Dr. Michael Brundage ]
November 1, 2015

Queen's researcher Michael Brundage discusses his research on quality of life which he undertakes as part of the Canadian Cancer Trials Group and the Queen's Cancer Research Institute.

[ Annette Hay smiling at computer ]
November 1, 2015

Queen's researcher with the Queen's Cancer Research Institute, Annette Hay discusses her research on clinical trials and Ontario’s Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).

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