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Understanding the Universe

Understanding the Universe

[Alice Vibert Douglas and colleagues at Yerkes Observatory, Chicago, 1925 (Queen's University Archives)]
October 1, 2016

One of the oldest universities in Canada, research at Queen's University has left an indelible mark on the Canadian, and international, landscape of scholarly progress.

Dr. Heather Jamieson samples soil near the Giant Mine in Yellowknife]
October 1, 2016

Queen’s made significant and successful efforts to attract women researchers to campus through the 1980s, including through such programs as the Queen’s National Scholar Program.

[photo of student research from University Archives]
October 1, 2016

Today, with more than 120 programs, graduate and undergraduate education and research at Queen’s has spread to all corners of campus in all disciplines.

[illustration by Carl Wiens]
April 1, 2016

Science journalist Ivan Semeniuk retraces the history of Canada’s Nobel Prize-winning physics experiment led by Queen's researcher Arthur McDonald.

[Photo of Arthur B McDonald Copyright Nobel Media 2015 - Photo by Pi Frisk]
November 1, 2015

An interest in mechanics led Queen's researcher Arthur McDonald, the 2015 co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics, to study the universe on a fundamental level, through physics.

[ Professor Patrick Martin ]
April 1, 2015

Queen's researcher Patrick Martin of the Queen’s School of Computing, along with business professor Brent Gallupe, is being given the chance to use IBM’s Watson cognitive computing system as an integral part of the department’s CISC 490 course, Deep Analytics using Watson.

[ Dr. Suning Wang with students ]
April 1, 2015

Queen's researcher Suning Wang, professor in the Department of Chemistry, works with student researchers in the Wang Group lab to revolutionize electronics through designing and synthesizing novel compounds that emit blue luminescence for use in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

[Queen’s astrophysicist Stéphane Courteau and his students]
April 1, 2015

Together with the SNOLAB group, Queen’s astrophysicists like Stéphane Courteau, and their students, form one of the most active centres for research on dark matter in the world.

[ Dr. Cathy Crudden with research students ]
September 1, 2014

Queen's researcher Cathy Crudden discusses her lab's work on catalysis and chirality, along with her experience working with student researchers. 

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