School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Education

The actual courses offered each term will be determined by student demand and the availability of faculty. Most courses will take the form of seminars and individual studies for a total of 36 hours. During the fall and winter terms courses normally require three hours per week. The 36 hours for each course are scheduled over four weeks during the summer term period.

EDUC-800*     Curriculum Design and Implementation     
Explores the theory and practice of curriculum design. Theoretical bases and practical implications of different models of curriculum innovation in relation to curriculum policies and educational change will be examined. Applicable to both school and professional-based learning environments. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-801* Special Topics in Curriculum and Instruction     
Topics vary from term to term. They include: the curriculum in such areas as Reading, Science, Mathematics, Counselling, Adult Education, English, Social Studies, Health Sciences, Aesthetic Education, Experiential Education, Language Education, etc. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-802* Understanding Curriculum
Explores theories and philosophies that have shaped the field of curriculum across contexts. Focusses on understanding social, political, and cultural aspects of the complex, shifting, and interconnected relationship between curriculum and pedagogy. Deepens awareness of curriculum understanding by including diverse perspectives from dominant and non-dominant traditions. Fall; C. Ahn.  
Equivalent: EDUC-873*
Exclusion: EDUC-873*

EDUC-803*  Contemporary Curriculum Theory
This course is designed to extend knowledge of curriculum theory and criticism.  By construing curriculum as a tension between individuals and society, the course considers the impact of contemporary thought on central curriculum concepts like knowledge, subject matter, assessment, teaching, and learning.  Summer; H. McGregor
PRE-REQUISITE EDUC-802. 

EDUC-805* Foundations of Scholarly Work
This course introduces students to the foundational skills of scholarly work.  There will be a practical emphasis on academic writing development, argumentation, grantsmanship, and engagement within a scholarly community.  This course will also explore the foundational structures and components of academic texts including journal articles, grant applications, conference proposals, books, chapters, etc.  Grading will be a pass/fail basis for this course. Fall/Winter; B. Bolden

EDUC-806* Scholarly Writing and Dissemination
This course will explore scholarly writing, publication, and dissemination practices within the field of education.  Throughout, students will engage in short and long writing activities designed to form a basis for strong writing skills.  Students will also learn close reading and critique techniques in order to identify exemplary writing practices.  Students will be encouraged to experiment with different forms of scholarly writing with the goal of writing publishable work in their area of research by the end of the course.  Dissemination opportunities and outlets will be discussed.  Students in this course should have established foundational scholarly skills and be prepared to disseminate content (i.e., findings or arguments) publicly.  Winter; C. DeLuca

EDUC-809* Assessment of Student Growth and Achievement     
This course will address basic practices, procedures, and reporting of student assessment as these apply to students, classrooms and schools. Principles of sound teacher-made and standardized assessments of student growth and achievement will be the major topics studied. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-810*     Topics in Literacy Education     
This study of the current state of literacy education will include the following topics: definitions and philosophies of literacy in English pedagogy, social and cultural influences, literary theories, writing and reading pedagogies, practices of interpretation, current trends in literacy research, issues of assessment, and influences of media and technology on literacy. Fall; P. Beach.

EDUC-811*     Second/Foreign Language Education     
Current theories in Second/Foreign Language Education will be examined. Topics will include French as a Second Language, French Immersion, English as a Second Language, Foreign Languages, and the difference between acquisition and instruction. Not offered 2019-20.
EXCLUSION: EDUC-829*

EDUC-812*     Adult Education     
An introduction to adult education as a field of study and practice that fosters collaborative and learner-directed inquiry in the field of adult education. The course will focus on understanding how adults learn, developing and implementing effective curricula for adult learners, and helping adult educators reflect on the adult education process. It is suitable for all educators who want to learn more about adult learning issues, practices and concepts by applying adult learning theories to their own learning and teaching lives. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-813*     Improving the Art of Teaching     
Explores the art of teaching from scholarly and pedagogical perspectives. Literature includes teacher knowledge and thinking, strategies for improving professional development, and processes of change in school settings. The course will involve the use of approaches such as pattern, design, story, metaphor, rhythm, and mystery as strategies to enhance teaching and learning. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-815*     Learning as Transformation     
Transformative learning is the self-directed process by which we change the assumptions, beliefs, values or perspectives shaping our actions. The goal of this course is to help educators understand and promote transformative learning in our everyday lives and classrooms. The course approach will model its topic: we will use self-directed and transformative learning strategies in class sessions, and decisions about content and process will be the shared responsibility of the group and facilitator. Summer; E. MacEachren

EDUC-820*     Psychological Foundations of Learning     
An introduction to diverse historical and contemporary perspectives on human learning and cognition. Topics may include cognitive processes, motivation, situated cognition, and the application of educational psychology through a critical lens. Fall; I. Matheson.

EDUC-821*     Development of Language and Literacy     
An examination of current theories of literacy development in multiple forms and the related instructional approaches. Literacy is defined broadly; topics vary from year to year and may include the cognitive development of writing, digital literacy, and visual literacy. Not offered 2019-20. 

EDUC-822*     Inclusion of Exceptional Learners
An examination of the learning characteristics of children, adolescents, and adults with a range of exceptionalities, including giftedness, intellectual/developmental disabilities, behavioural disorders, communicational, physical, multiple, and learning disabilities. A major focus of this course will be on how we can successfully include individuals with exceptionalities in our classrooms and in our society. Winter; D. Berg.

EDUC-823*     Psychology of Reading     
An examination of current theories of reading processes and their implications for teaching reading and student learning from reading. One or more topics are covered in greater depth; topics vary from year to year and may include comprehension and study strategies, reading disabilities, the measurement of reading abilities, and word recognition skills. Pre- or corequisite: EDUC-820* or consent of instructor. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-824*  Psychology of Exceptionalities  
An examination of the concept of exceptionality, current understanding on the causes of exceptionalities, and instructional approaches. Topics may include cognitive and behavioural functioning, assessment, diagnosis and remediation, social cognition, and motivation.
Pre- or co-requisite: EDUC-820* or consent of instructor.  Not offered in 2019-20

EDUC-825* Self-regulation and Executive Functions 
This course applies theoretical perspectives to the study of executive functioning and self-regulation.  Executive function topics include:  theoretical models of executive functions, executive function development across the lifespan; the relations among executive functions, achievement, and behaviour; influences of individual differences and environmental contexts (e.g., classrooms) on self-regulation and executive functions.  Students will consider implications of research on self-regulated learning in a variety of contexts.  Self-regulation topics focus on: basic regulatory processes, cognitive, social and developmental dimensions of self-regulation, and self-regulation challenges.  Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-826*     Motivation in Education     
A review of theories of motivation and their practical applications within educational and other applied settings. The course will focus on current principles of motivation and include topics such as psychodynamics, attribution theory, goal theory, goal orientations, competences, interest, intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and biocultural factors. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-827*     Measurement in Learning     
This course focuses on the principles of instrument development, use, and analyses for the measurement of educational outcomes and constructs. Course topics will include survey and test development, factor analysis, reliability and validity. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-828*  Topics in Program Evaluation    
Determining the merit of educational programs requires that there be a fit between the needs and intentions of the program and the theoretical foundation guiding the evaluation. Students in this course will examine competing theoretical models of evaluation and be able to argue for their uses in particular program contexts. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-829* Social Cognition
A seminar course reviewing current research and theories of social cognition as applied to education.  Topics will include situated cognition, self-regulation, and motivation.  Winter; R. Reeve

EDUC-830*  Advanced Topics in Psychology of Learning and Cognition     
An advanced course for treatment of current research interests of graduate faculty and students in Psychology of Learning and Cognition. Topics will vary from term to term. This course is designed for students who have a strong background in Psychology of Learning and Cognition. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-833*   Language and Learning     
An examination of current theories and practices focusing on the role of language in learning. This course will focus on the study of language acquisition and development and their implications for education through topics such as syntax, lexicology, morphology, phonology, discourse analysis and pragmatics. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-840*   Educational Assessment
Current theories and practices in generating and interpreting student assessment data are changing the way we measure achievement and learning.  Using such data obtained from classrooms, schools, school boards, provincial, national and internal assessment programs, this course explores the use and impact of these evolving theories and practices. Fall; L. Cheng.
PRE-REQUISITE EDUC-892* or equivalent and EDUC-827* or equivalent. 

EDUC-841* Perspectives on Program Evaluation
Expanding purposes and contexts for program evaluation draw on multiple theoretical frameworks and methodologies.  Exploring evaluation decision making from these multiple perspectives provides insights into the scope, limitations and future territory of evaluation use.  PRE-REQUISITE: EDUC-828* or equivalent.  Winter; M. Searle

EDUC-842*     Teaching and Learning in Mathematics, Science and Technology     
This course will investigate theories of cognition and research on teacher practice as related to mathematics, science and technology.  It will include an examination of assessment practices, use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in teaching and learning, and translation of curriculum policy into practice. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-850* Critical Theories in Educational Contexts     
This course introduces students to critical theories in educational contexts and examines and critiques the organization of power around cultural difference, race, class, ethnicity and other social/cultural markers. Teaching practices and policies that contribute to positive social change will also be explored. Fall; A. Butler

EDUC-851* Issues in Cultural and Global Studies in Education
A seminar course that introduces students to critical social theories, current approaches to cultural analysis, theories of identity, sub-cultural positionings, to the practice and implications of social/cultural theories and global issues.  Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-852*     History and Philosophy of Education     
This course focuses on the historical and contemporary shaping of education through worldviews embedded in context. It explores and critiques the ways in which history and philosophy have been used to design and justify various educational approaches and structures. Winter; T. Christou.

EDUC-853* Advanced Studies in History and Philosophy of Education
The course will discuss a variety of topics in education policy from the perspectives of philosophy and history of education.  Various schools of thought, both philosophical and historical, will be considered in discussing policies. 
Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-854* Issues in Culture and Technology Studies in Education
A seminar course that introduces student to current critical thinking on technology, imagined within the largest possible framework as the human built world, and as such, as a cultural and social endeavour.  Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-855*     Culture, Power and Knowledge:  Looking to Possibility     
Seminar participants will study issues pertinent to understanding the relationship between schooling and popular culture. Using the theories and methodologies of postmodernism/poststructuralism, particular attention will be paid to the relationship between culture as a social artifact and its expressions within the practices of education in the new Millennium. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-856* Advanced Topics in Cultural and Policy Studies
An advanced seminar course in critical social theories, current approaches to cultural analysis, theories of identity and sub-cultural positioning, and the theories and processes of developing, implementing, analyzing and evaluating policy.  Winter; L. Airton.
PREREQUISITE: one of EDUC-851* or EDUC-861*. 

EDUC-857* Social Inequity in Education: A Global Perspective 
This seminar course examines educational inequality in Canada and internationally by reviewing theoretical frameworks and evidence on a range of social processes resulting in unequal distributions of individual resources.  Throughout the seminar, inequalities in both outcomes and opportunities will be considered with attention to the consequences of inequalities for intergenerational social mobility.  Alternate approaches for understanding the emergence, persistence, and mitigation of educational inequalities will be examined in relation to gender, race, social class, sexuality, and disability.  Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-860* The Organization of Education
This course examines the established, emerging, and competing paradigms that shape the organization of education within and outside of schools. Students will explore and critique current organizational forms and practices from multiple perspectives as well as key concepts and theories of organization and of organizational behaviour. Additionally, students will consider how organizational forms and practices in education have affected diverse populations. Course topics may include organizational frames, leadership, governance, power, conflict resolution, equitable access, and sustainability. Winter; T. Pillay
Equivalent: EDUC-876*
Exclusion: EDUC-876* 

EDUC-861*     Policy Studies in Education     
This course will introduce students to a critical study of policy in general and of policies in education in particular. The intention of this course is to develop in students a critical awareness of the social construction of policy, of intended and contingent impacts of policy, and of the components constituting the policy cycle. The process of policy-making will be explored using various perspectives and understandings of the phases of policy development, implementation, and evaluation. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-862*     Educational Leadership     
This course focuses on the historical and contemporary shaping of education through worldviews embedded in context. It explores and critiques the ways in which history and philosophy have been used to design and justify various educational approaches and structures. Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-863* Seminar in Policy Studies
A seminar course that introduces students to theoretical underpinnings of policy studies and a more in-depth understanding of the processes and challenges of developing, implementing, analyzing and evaluating policy from different perspectives.  The course will examine the construction and deconstruction of educational policy through the lenses of various theoretical frameworks.  This course will develop students’ insight, knowledge and skills in multiple uses of policy within the historical, social, and political contexts through the discussion of specific policy issues and case studies of policy in practice.  Fall; B. Kutsyuruba.

EDUC-864*  Knowledge Mobilization and Translation
There is an oft-cited gap between research, policy and practice.  A new field of inquiry called knowledge mobilization (KMb) in education and knowledge translation (KT) in other sectors seek to address these gaps by integrating research and data use at multiple levels of the system to improve knowledge uptake.  KMb and KT involve collaboration among diverse stakeholders including (but not limited to) researchers, intermediary organizations, practitioners, policymakers and community members.  This course will focus on theory, research, and practical strategies related to KMb/KT across sectors.  Not offered 2019-20.

EDUC-871* Indigenous Languages Revitalization
The focus of this course is on Indigenous languages and language revitalization. We will also discuss Indigenous Englishes and English literacy. Assessment will be based on participation, as well as two submitted assignments: an abstract and a final project. Summer; TBA.

EDUC-872*  Educational Research in Indigenous Contexts
An introduction to educational inquiry that focuses on the principal Western approaches and on the design and implementation of research appropriate for Indigenous contexts. Topics may include oral traditions, narrative research, archival research, Indigenous epistemologies, decolonization of research methodology, and ethical concerns about intellectual property. The course provides initial preparation for thesis and project work and introduces students to the tools and conventions of educational inquiry: for example, library searches, use of primary and secondary sources, ethical review considerations, writing graduate assignments. Summer; TBA.

EDUC-873* Indigenous Pedagogy & Practice
The course will focus on Indigenous worldviews and philosophies in the development of curriculum and instructional practice, including traditional conceptions of curriculum. Students will engage in theoretical and practical inquiry by exploring a range of research. Students will examine curriculum transformation in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. Not offered 2019-20.
Equivalent: EDUC-802*
Exclusion: EDUC-802*

EDUC-874*   Special Topics in Indigenous Education  
Topics vary from term to term and may include: science education, place-based learning and teaching, revitalizing Indigenous language, current issues facing Indigenous educators worldwide, adult learning, culture and cognition and Indigenous philosophy.
Summer; TBA.

EDUC-875*   Qualitative Inquiry: Orality in Indigenous Thought
Prepares students to undertake research using qualitative approaches appropriate to Indigenous contexts, such as narrative studies based in oral traditions, and their impact on Indigenous thought, participant observation, and ethnography. Not offered 2019-20.
Prerequisite: EDUC-872 or permission of instructor.

EDUC-876*    Government Policies within an Indigenous Context
Will prepare students to examine current government policies in relation to Indigenous populations and communities within Canada. This course will explore how policies have been initiated, developed and implemented, taking into consideration their relevance to Indigenous education. Students will also learn to analyse the extent to which Indigenous worldviews have been reflected at different stages of the policy cycle. Not offered 2019-20.
Equivalent: EDUC-860*
Exclusion: EDUC-860*

EDUC-877*  Teaching & Assessing Students with Special Needs in Indigenous Contexts
An examination of current theories on the contextual and individual factors contributing to special needs and how these theories can inform teaching which appropriately addresses special needs in Indigenous contexts. Winter; TBA.

EDUC-878*     Master’s Internship     
A research-informed internship in a context that enables learning through experience, under the guidance of an approved mentor, about issues germane to Aboriginal and World Indigenous Educational Studies. The Internship will be evaluated by a member of the Graduate Faculty approved by the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of Education.

EDUC-879*  International Indigenous Issues
This course focuses on both historic and emerging Indigenous political, economic and social issues from an international perspective. Students will learn to analyse the similarities and differences between various Indigenous nations globally and the situations they confront. This course will also explore various Indigenous responses to global issues, and ongoing efforts to resolve these issues. Fall; TBA.

EDUC-880*   Educational Internship
This internship entails an authentic work experience opportunity for student experiential learning at the graduate level. The internship involves students in research, teaching, and/or professional contexts that provide practical learning related to the student’s program of study. The internship will be supervised by the internship host in conjunction with a designated faculty member, normally the student’s supervisor. The internship will be approved by the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of Education and evaluated by the designated faculty member supervisor and internship host. The duration of an internship is normally one term (four months). Internships can be paid or unpaid. Securing an internship is the responsibility of the student. This course is mandatory for those students enrolled in the dual degree program. The grading will be Pass/Fail.

EDUC-881* Educational Internship II
This internship entails an authentic work experience opportunity for student experiential learning at the graduate level. The internship involves students in research, teaching, and/or professional contexts that provide practical learning related to the student’s program of study. The internship will be supervised by the internship host in conjunction with a designated faculty member, normally the student’s supervisor. The internship will be approved by the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of Education and evaluated by the designated faculty member supervisor and internship host. The duration of an internship is normally one term (four months). Internships can be paid or unpaid. Securing an internship is the responsibility of the student. The grading will be Pass/Fail.

EDUC-882* Individual Study I
A study selected by the student under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. Normally, this half course will take the form of a closely supervised reading course in the area of the instructor’s expertise.

EDUC-883* Individual Study II  
A study selected by the student under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. Normally, this half course will take the form of a closely supervised reading course in the area of the instructor's expertise.

EDUC-884*  Individual Study III  
A study selected by the student under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. Normally, this course will take the form of a closely supervised reading course in the area of the instructor's expertise.

EDUC-888*     Advanced Special Topics in Cultural and Policy Studies     
Topics vary from term to term, and reflect current research interests of the graduate faculty. Winter; J. Pyper.

EDUC-890*     Introduction to Educational Research     
An introduction to educational inquiry and its principal approaches. The course involves students in activities associated with educational inquiry, and is an initial preparation for thesis and project work. Because the course is introductory, it exposes students to the tools and conventions of educational inquiry: for example, library searches, use of primary and secondary sources, writing graduate assignments. Fall; J. Schurr.

EDUC-892*     Topics in Quantitative Research     
Prepares students to undertake quantitative research in education. Basic methodological problems, statistical design and reasoning are among the topics addressed. Winter; S. Chahine.
PREREQUISITE:  EDUC-890* or permission of instructor.

EDUC-895*     Topics in Qualitative Research     
Prepares students to undertake research using qualitative approaches such as case studies, participant observation, document analysis, and ethnography. Winter; L. Colgan.
PREREQUISITE:  EDUC-890* or permission of instructor.

EDUC-898   Master's Project     
An investigation under the guidance of a Project Supervisor terminating in a written report or essay, under the current degree requirements having the equivalence of two half courses. The project is evaluated by the Project Supervisor and one other member of the graduate faculty approved by the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. (Refer to Graduate Studies in Education: A Handbook.)

EDUC-899  Master's Thesis     
A research endeavour under the guidance of a Thesis Supervisor, under the current degree requirements having the equivalence of four half courses. The thesis is completed and examined in accordance with the regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

EDUC-900* Doctoral Seminar     
This is a required course for all doctoral student taken over the fall and winter terms in their first year of study. Faculty and students will present seminars of an interdisciplinary nature. Students registered in the course will be required to present one of the seminars. Grading will be pass/fail. This course is designed to explore the various research paradigms, methods of research, and the problems related to research design. Fall; L. Cheng. Fall/Winter; R. Upitis. .

EDUC-999  Ph.D. Thesis     

The following courses are the courses offered under the Graduate Diploma in Professional Inquiry (GDPI). All courses are 3.0 credit units.

REQUIRED COURSES
GDPI-800*     Self-Regulated Inquiry and Learning     
Provides opportunities for exploration of current theories of self-regulated learning. Self-regulated learning requires autonomous management of learning through effective goal setting, resource allocation, valid self-assessment, and goal revision. Offered jointly with PME-800*.
EXCLUSION: PME-800*

GDPI-801*     Collaborative Inquiry     
This course will enable the student to understand the foundational principles of collaborative learning and to enact those principles in professional practice. This, in turn, will lead to the creation of a collaborative learning community within the context of the course where the knowledge and skills of professional inquiry will be explored and demonstrated. Offered jointly with PME-801*
EXCLUSION: PME-801*

GDPI-802*     Program Inquiry and Evaluation     
This course will guide students in conducting systematic evaluative inquiry in support of the data-informed program decision-making. Students will examine the multiple purposes of program evaluation applying the principles, methods and logic inherent in the needs of targeted program personnel and decision makers. Offered jointly with PME-802*.
EXCLUSION: PME-802*

ELECTIVE COURSES
GDPI-810*     Integrated Planning, Instruction, and Assessment     
This course will enable students to inquire into the interconnected structures of planning, instruction, and assessment through an understanding of curricular frameworks. Students will understand the complexities of their intended work environments and apply that understanding to analyze planning, instruction, and assessment to a specific context of practice.  Offered jointly with PME-810*.
EXCLUSION: PME-810*

GDPI-811*     Innovation in Teaching and Learning     
This course will help students develop a foundational understanding of innovation in the workplace grounded in exploration of historical, sociological, and philosophical contexts and frameworks. Students will explore case studies and develop a plan of action rooted in the particular needs of their workplace.  Offered jointly with PME-811*.
EXCLUSION: PME-811*

GDPI-812*     Organizational Learning     
The goals of this course are to examine theory, research and case-studies on organizations in public service sectors using professional inquiry approaches. Topics will include organizational theory, structure and bureaucracy, organizations and their environments, human resources, politics, decision-making, leadership and organizational change. Ultimately, this course will prepare students to apply the concepts covered in the course to their professional context. Offered jointly with PME-812*.
EXCLUSION: PME-812*

GDPI-813*     Knowledge Translation and Mobilization     
Knowledge translation (KT) and mobilization (KMb) includes efforts to strengthen connections between research, policy and practice in public service sectors. This course looks at the theory, science and practice of KT/ KMb in order to enable practitioners to find, share, assess and apply evidence in their particular professional setting.  Offered jointly with PME-813*.
EXCLUSION: PME-813*

The following courses are the courses offered under the Professional Master of Education (PME). All courses are 3.0 credit units.

PME-800*     Self-Regulated Inquiry and Learning     
Provides opportunities for exploration of current theories of self-regulated learning. Self-regulated learning requires autonomous management of learning through effective goal setting, resource allocation, valid self-assessment, and goal revision. Offered jointly with GDPI-800*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-800*

PME-801*     Collaborative Inquiry     
This course will enable the student to understand the foundational principles of collaborative learning and to enact those principles in professional practice. This, in turn, will lead to the creation of a collaborative learning community within the context of the course where the knowledge and skills of professional inquiry will be explored and demonstrated. Offered jointly with GDPI-801*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-801*

PME-802*     Program Inquiry and Evaluation     
This course will guide students in conducting systematic evaluative inquiry in support of the data-informed program decision-making. Students will examine the multiple purposes of program evaluation applying the principles, methods and logic inherent in the needs of targeted program personnel and decision makers. Offered jointly with GDPI-802*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-802*

PME-803*     Organizational Leadership      
This course provides an overview of theories of leadership and an evolution of the practices of leadership within organizations in general, and educational institutions in particular. Participants will examine the social and cultural construction of leadership, will gain an understanding of the range of roles and responsibilities that a leader has within an organization; will apply effectively selected leadership skills and processes; and will develop conceptual frameworks to understand behaviours within the organization.

PME-810*     Integrated Planning, Instruction, and Assessment     
This course will enable students to inquire into the interconnected structures of planning, instruction, and assessment through an understanding of curricular frameworks. Students will understand the complexities of their intended work environments and apply that understanding to analyze planning, instruction, and assessment to a specific context of practice. Offered jointly with GDPI-810*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-810*

PME-811*     Innovation in Teaching and Learning     
This course will help students develop a foundational understanding of innovation in the workplace grounded in exploration of historical, sociological, and philosophical contexts and frameworks. Students will explore case studies and develop a plan of action rooted in the particular needs of their workplace. Offered jointly with GDPI-811*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-811*

PME-812*     Organizational Learning     
The goals of this course are to examine theory, research and case-studies on organizations in public service sectors using professional inquiry approaches. Topics will include organizational theory, structure and bureaucracy, organizations and their environments, human resources, politics, decision-making, leadership and organizational change. Ultimately, this course will prepare students to apply the concepts covered in the course to their professional context. Offered jointly with GDPI-812*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-812*

PME-813*     Knowledge Translation and Mobilization     
Knowledge translation (KT) and mobilization (KMb) includes efforts to strengthen connections between research, policy and practice in public service sectors. This course looks at the theory, science and practice of KT/ KMb in order to enable practitioners to find, share, assess and apply evidence in their particular professional setting. Offered jointly with GDPI-813*.
EXCLUSION: GDPI-813*

PME-820*     Aboriginal Leadership and Knowledge in the School and Classroom     
The primary expected outcome of this course is an understanding of Aboriginal approaches to education, leadership, and knowledge from the perspective of Culture-Based Education. Students are encouraged to engage in peer-to-peer learning to expand upon their own awareness and challenge preconceptions. Because of this, this course is encouraged for students from all backgrounds with varying levels of cultural awareness.

PME-821*     Policy and Models in Canadian Aboriginal Education: From Residential Schools to Culture-Based Education     
This course examines the history of Aboriginal education policy and models for Aboriginal education in Canada. It begins with an examination of Aboriginal approaches to education prior to and at contact, then goes on to discuss colonial approaches, including the Residential school system. Following this, it will examine post-colonial policy and education across provinces and First Nations.

PME-822*     Aboriginal Languages and Language Teaching     
This course examines the diversity and current status of the Aboriginal Languages of the Americas, including their distribution, status, structure, use, and connection to culture. Students will then gain an overview of language teaching methodologies and an examination of the selection of appropriate methodologies for Aboriginal language teaching and language programming.

PME-826*     Using Classroom and Large-Scale Assessment Data     
This increasing emphasis on school accountability and improvement places demands on teachers and administrators to be able to interpret the meaning of assessment results. These data often form the foundation for setting priorities and setting targets. Given this importance of these activities it is critical that data users be able to identify the strengths and limitations of these data in supporting decision-making.

PME-827*     Planning and Implementing Classroom Assessment     
The assessment of learning and achievement is a global phenomenon. Over the last 2 decades there has been considerable research demonstrating how well conceived assessment can be a powerful force both in supporting learning, and as a mechanism for individual empowerment. Yet, no matter how clearly assessment policies are defined, how concisely strategies for implementing assessment are described, and how many sample instruments are available for adoption or adaptation, the planning and implementing of assessment in classrooms continues to be a complex “wicked problem”.

PME-828*     Conducting Quality Program Evaluations     
Educators plan and implement programs as a way to address the needs of students and their communities. These needs may be rooted in learning, recreation, behaviour, school culture and health and well-being to name a few. Typically, classroom and school based programs are spearheaded by individual champions or working groups. Their focus is typically on program activities and the challenge of implementation. Rarely do they have the time or resources to learn, in any systematic way, how their programs are working or how they might be improved. This is an issue especially when decisions have to be made about whether programs should be supported, expanded, continued or allowed to end.

PME-831*     Innovative Curriculum Planning     
Leaders in classroom practice are innovative curriculum planners. A review of the historical and philosophical roots of innovation in education will lead to an exploration of contemporary curriculum and instructional innovations such as those that now promote curriculum integration, learning in depth, and environmental inquiry. Students will have opportunities to practice innovative curriculum planning paying close attention to how the curriculum is intended to shape learning.

PME-832*     The Connected Classroom     
Leaders in classroom practice help learners make strong connections to the world outside the classroom. This course examines the foundations of why, when and how to enlarge the context for learning and explores avenues that yield integrated and authentic learning experiences. Examples of connectedness are found in classrooms that connect to students’ experiences at home, integrate opportunities for informal education, encourage the involvement of community members, foster community service, and cultivate relevant and appropriate uses of the internet. The focus of learning will be on how to trigger, facilitate and enrich learning through outreach activities.

PME-833*     Critical and Creative Thinking     
Leaders in classroom practice are concerned with the quality of both their own and their students’ thinking. This course provides guided opportunities to investigate and implement newer frameworks for practice, especially those intended to support students in becoming independent and innovative thinkers. Decisions about how learning is structured and managed and how students participate and interact will be considered in light of their potential to propel students’ thinking forward, deeper and in more creative directions.

PME-841*     Theoretical and Historical Foundations of Literacy 
This course provides an overview of the history of literacy instruction and currently accepted theories of literacy development. Participants will develop conceptual frameworks to understand literacy from cognitive and sociocultural perspectives and will gain an understanding of the how these different perspectives condition the range of roles and responsibilities of an instructional leader of literacy education.

PME-842*     Component Skills     
This course introduces students to the components of literacy, including phonological awareness, decoding, reading comprehension, vocabulary and reading fluency and others. Participants will gain an understanding of how these components interact to contribute to literacy development in a range of readers.

PME-843*     Effective Intervention     
This course builds on PME-842 (Literacy: Component Skills) to acquaint participants with research-based interventions and effective programming for a variety of literacy outcomes. Participants will gain an understanding of how these interventions meet the learning needs of typical and exceptional learners and how success of these interventions is measured.

PME-851*     Culture, Curriculum and Pedagogy     
This course requires students to explore their roles as curriculum theorists within the daily, lived experiences of overseas classroom teaching. The role of cultural difference within the interconnected structures of planning, instruction, and assessment will be explored as it relates to the impact of daily teaching and learning in overseas contexts. Students will articulate the complexities of cultural difference and apply that understanding to analyze planning, instruction, and assessment.

PME-852*     Approaches to Professional Learning     
This course will explore the particular role and place of inquiry within an International school teaching context. Students will broaden and deepen their knowledge of professional resources and publications for overseas educators. They will learn about the types of inquiry most relevant to overseas educators, how to gather, analyze, interpret and articulate various forms of data.

PME-853* Professional Community Membership     
Students will explore their roles and responsibilities related to the dissemination of the knowledge they gain through their own professional learning. As overseas educators, often confronted by cultural differences in their everyday teaching, finding ways to share new information and ideas on how to acknowledge these differences in the classroom is a professional obligation. Students will be expected to find appropriate outlets for a variety of written articles (opinion pieces, practical tips and tricks, professional inquiry data…etc.)

PME-878 Experiential Practice in Education
This opportunity for experiential learning entails an authentic work/teaching opportunity for students enrolled in the Professional Masters of Education program. The course gives students the opportunity to initiate their own practical learning experience that connects their previous course-based learning to practical contexts through teaching, action-based inquiry, or professional experiences related to their chosen concentration of study. The course will be supervised and work evaluated by an instructor, and will include the opportunity for collaborative peer feedback and discussion as students proceed through setting up and implementing their chosen projects. The duration of this experiential learning course is normally one term (four months). The grading will be Pass/Fail.

PME-896* Capstone Project
This is a self-directed course that allows professionals to explore an aspect of their emerging leadership within the context of developing and completing a capstone project. The purpose of this project is to enable students to more deeply explore the current and relevant educational challenges and issues within their own practice and/or organization. Students enrolled in this course will work independently with an instructor who will help guide the completion of the capstone project, providing suggestions, direction, and clarity.  This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
EXCLUSION: PME-898*