School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Rehabilitation Sciences

Courses listed below represent the range of RHBS graduate rehabilitation science course offerings in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. Not all courses will be offered in each academic year and the current calendar should be consulted for the term and instructor. The Rehabilitation Science program offers 1.5 credit-unit courses as well as 3.0 credit-unit 'term' courses. The  3.0 credit-unit 'term' courses are indicated below by an asterisk.

RHBS-801*/901*     Motor Performance in Rehabilitation     
This seminar course examines theories of motor control and current literature relating to the neuromuscular, physiological, and biomechanical aspects of volitional movement. Motor performance outcomes will be discussed within the context of physical rehabilitation and motor control. Three term hours. Limited enrollment. Not offered 2018-19.

RHBS-802*/902*     Disability and Wellness in the Community     
This lecture/seminar course examines the concepts of disablement, community and the social participation of persons with disabilities. Topics include definition, models and evaluation of disablement and social participation; the relationships between people with disabilities and their environments; and current controversial issues in the area of disability, wellness and rehabilitation. Three term hours.Not offered 2018-19..

RHBS-803     Seminar Program for M.Sc. Students     
Credit will be based upon attendance and participation in the departmental seminar program as well as sessions addressing specific issues relating to graduate education. In addition, each student will be required to present a seminar based upon his/her research work. (Pass/Fail). Fall and winter terms.

RHBS-804*/904*     Rehabilitation Science     
This seminar course addresses foundational theory and contemporary issues in rehabilitation science, including research strategies, principles of measurement and ethical issues. Informed by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, the course highlights policy and research about functioning in people who may use rehabilitation services. Three-term hours; Fall. Limited enrollment.

RHBS-810     Fundamentals of Disability     
This lecture/seminar module provides an introduction to disability. The module examines the concepts of disability in a contemporary Canadian and international context. Topics include: definitions, models, history; classification and types of disability, disability prevalence and statistics; disability across the lifespan, including community and social participation; disability around the world. (1.5 credit units).   Please check department for availability. 
EXCLUSIONS: RHBS-802*, RHBS-902*

RHBS-811     Advanced Disability Studies     
This module examiners complex issues associated with disability in a contemporary Canadian and international context.Topics include: advocacy and disability policy; human rights; research in disability studies; models of service for people with disabilities; issues for people with disabilities (e.g. employment, education, poverty, housing, access). (1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.
PREREQUISITE: RHBS-810 or permission of the instructor.      
EXCLUSIONS: RHBS-802*, RHBS-902*      

RHBS-812*/912*     Program Development and Evaluation     
Students will learn to evaluate new and existing programs in both the private and public health care sectors. Topics covered will include needs assessment, analysis of resources, implementation and the ongoing measurement of a program’s success.

RHBS-815     Community Based Rehabilitation     
This module course prepares students to design, implement and evaluate community based rehabilitation (CBR) initiatives for and with persons with disabilities globally. The historical development of CBR and its philosophical and theoretical underpinnings will be discussed, as will the current international development landscape.(1.5 credit units)
EXCLUSIONS: RHBS-877*, RHBS-977*  

RHBS-820     Philosophy of Research     
This module introduces the philosophy of research, including the nature and role of world views, systems of logic, and theory in the research process. The implications of this content with respect to the generation of research questions and the selection of research designs, methods, analytic approaches and knowledge translation strategies will be explored. (1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.

RHBS-822     Knowledge Translation     
This module examines the foundations of knowledge translation (KT) in health care. Topics include terms, definitions, frameworks and approaches to KT; specific issues related to KT in rehabilitation science; barrier and facilitators to KT; KT interventions and evaluations, and developing KT plans. (1.5 credit units).

RHBS-825     Regression Analysis     
Students will gain fundamental knowledge of regression analyses as used in rehabilitation/health research, and practical skills to conduct such analyses.Topics include correlation, basic linear regression, multivariate linear regression, and logistic regression. SPSS, statistical software will be used throughout the course. (1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.
PREREQUISITE: undergraduate statistics.
EXCLUSION: RHBS-834*

RHBS-826     Validation and Reliability Testing     
Students will gain fundamental knowledge of validity and reliability testing and practical skills to conduct such analyses. Topics on reliability testing include correlation, coefficients of variation, Intraclass correlation coefficients, Bland Altman Analysis, and Generalizability Theory.SPSS statistical software will be used. (1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.
PREREQUISITE: undergraduate statistics
EXCLUSION:  RHBS-834*/ RHBS-934*

RHBS-830*     Professionals in Rural Practice: An Interdisciplinary Approach     
An examination of the issues related to integrating into rural practice as a professional, including understanding the history and geography of rural communities, and important issues affecting life in rural settings. Selected faculty from the health sciences, theology and education. (Offered jointly with THEO 730*). Three term hours. Limited enrolment. Not offered 2018-19.

RHBS-832*     Qualitative Methodology & Methods     
An overview of qualitative methodology and methods frequently used in health care research is provided. Topics include, but are not limited to, action research, ethnography, grounded theory, hermeneutics and phenomenology. Methods include focus groups, interviews and participatory observation. Opportunities may exist for interviewing, participatory observation and data analysis. (Cross listed with NURS-802*) 3 hour lecture/seminar. Not offered 2018-19.
EXCLUSION: NURS-802*      

RHBS-833*/933*     Research Methods I     
This course emphasizes the theoretical background in the development of a research proposal for rehabilitation-related research. Topics include development of the research question and problem statement, rationale, appropriate literature review and research design.Three term hours; Fall. Limited enrollment.

RHBS-834*/934*     Statistics     
A seminar course which will acquaint the student with the concepts and principles of quantitative statistical analysis including parametric and non-parametric methods. Students may present various topics throughout the course and critically evaluate research in their area of study. Three term hours; lectures/seminars. Limited enrollment. Not offered 2018-19.
PREREQUISITE: An undergraduate level statistics course

RHBS-836*/936*     Research Methods II     
This course guides the student through the process of data collection methods, data analysis and presentation, report/thesis writing and strategies for knowledge dissemination with respect to rehabilitation-related research. Three term hours. Limited enrollment. Not offered 2018-19.
PREREQUISITE: RHBS-833*/933*

RHBS-837*/937*     Signal Acquisition and Processing     
This is a lecture-seminar-laboratory based course covering the application, instrumentation, acquisition, signal processing and management of electrical signal data as they are used in the study of biomechanics and neuromuscular physiology.  Although the principles learned can be applied to many types of motor performance data, there will be an emphasis on electromyography. Laboratory exercises will be used to illustrate key issues related to signal acquisition and processing. Seminar presentations will allow students to investigate and present the application of data acquisition and processing specific to their particular area of interest.  Three term hours. Limited enrollment. Not offered 2018-19.
EXCLUSION: KHS-851*, KHS-857*, RHBS-857*/957*, RHBS-835*/935*      

RHBS-840     Motor Performance in Rehabilitation     
This module examines theories of motor control and current literature relating to the neuromuscular, physiological and biochemical aspects of volitional movement. Motor performance outcomes will be discussed within the context of physical rehabilitation and motor control. (1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.
EXCLUSIONS: RHBS-801*, RHBS-901*

RHBS-841     Instrumentation and Electromyography     
Students will learn the fundamentals of electrical signal acquisition, processing and interpretation for biomechanics and neuromuscular physiology applications. Laboratory exercises involving electromyography data acquisition and analysis will be used to illustrate key principles.(1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19. EXCLUSION:  KHS-851*, KHS-857*   
 

RHBS-842     Exercise Rehabilitation-Metabolic     
The role of exercise as a treatment modality will be examined in two chronic diseases with a metabolic underpinning: renal disease and diabetes. Topics will include the physiological limitations that can be addressed with exercise rehabilitation as well as maintenance of physiological health and wellbeing. (1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.
EXCLUSION: RHBS-873*

RHBS-843     Exercise Rehabilitation-Multifactor     
The role of exercise as a treatment modality will be examined in two chronic diseases with a multicomponent underpinning: chronic pain and mental health. Topics will include the physiological limitations that can be addressed with exercise rehabilitation as well as maintenance of physiological health and wellbeing.(1.0 credit units). Not offered 2018-19.
EXCLUSION: RHBS-873*     

RHBS-872*/972*     Motion Analysis     
A theoretical and practical course covering the application, instrumentation and techniques of human motion analysis. Topics include 2D and 3D kinematics, force measurement, link segment analysis and the application of these techniques to able-bodied and disabled populations. To integrate the material, the course combines readings, lectures, laboratories and projects. Three term hours. Limited enrollment. Not offered 2018-19.
EXCLUSION: KHS-859*, KHS-870*, RHBS871*/971*, RHBS-870*/970*

RHBS-873*     Exercise Rehabilitation     
This seminar-based course provides an overview of the most current guidelines for aerobic and resistance exercise prescription on a global basis in the rehabilitation field.  Specific emphasis will be placed on critical evidence-based analysis of exercise recommendations and outcomes for special populations, whether they are healthy or pathological in nature.  Three term-hours. Not offered 2018-19.

RHBS-874*/974*     Studies in Aging     
A lecture/seminar course which examines the neurophysiological, cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, cognitive and psycho-emotional aspects of aging and their significance in both motor performance and disability and wellness in the community. Three term hours. Limited enrollment. Contact department for availability.

RHBS-876*/976*     Independent Study     
A study under the guidance of a faculty member in a subject area related to the faculty member’s area of expertise or special interest that is not covered within existing courses. The study work must not directly overlap with the student’s thesis work. Normally this course will take the form of a closely supervised reading program, but may also include supervised laboratory work and/or specialized clinical experience. A course outline should be developed in consultation with the student’s supervisor and the proposed instructor. The course outline must be approved by the Chair of the Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Science prior to the student registering in this course. Fall, winter, or summer.

RHBS-877*/977*     Community-Based Rehabilitation     
This course prepares students to design, develop, implement and evaluate community based rehabilitation (CBR) programs for and with persons with disabilities internationally. Topics addressed include CBR history, concepts, and frameworks; relevant policy and global development agreements; education and training strategies in CBR; emancipatory and participatory approaches to research and evaluation; and the World Health Organization’s CBR matrix and its application to CBR practice, research and education. Not offered 2018-19.

RHBS-880*/980*     International Health
This course provides an overview of the major current issues in International Health. The epidemiology and prevention of the major causes of morbidity and mortality will be discussed as will the organization, management, and cost evaluation of health care resources. Three term hours. Not offered 2018-19.

RHBS-899     Master's Thesis Research     

RHBS-903     Seminar Program for Ph.D. Students     
This course requires attendance and participation in the departmental seminar series throughout each student’s program. Each doctoral student is required to present and preside over a minimum of 2 journal club presentations normally in the first two years of their program. In addition, each doctoral student will present a seminar on current issues, concepts or advanced topics in his/her area of specialization, and will provide two lectures related to his/her area of expertise in an appropriate entry level course at some point during their program. Prior to graduation, students will present their research findings in the seminar series. Assessment will be based on satisfactory completion of all course requirements (Pass/Fail). Fall and winter terms.

RHBS-921     Grant Writing for Rehabilitation Scientists     
This seminar course is designed to assist trainees who are working on  their research/thesis proposal to hone their grantsmanship skills. Students will work with their research proposal to prepare it for submission to a major granting council and will present it to the class for review and critique. (1.5 credit units). Limited enrollment. 
PREREQUISITE: [RHBS 904 and RHBS 933] or permission of the instructor

RHBS-932*     Qualitative Research Methods in Health Studies         
This course prepares student to evaluate and undertake health related research using qualitative approaches. Topics addressed include the philosophical foundations of qualitative research, research design and rigor, data collection, analysis and interpretation and ethical challenges.  Three term hours; lectures/seminars. Limited enrollment.

RHBS-999     Ph.D. Thesis Research