School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Psychology

Acting Head
Fekken, C.

Associate Head
Kuhlmeier, V.A.

Coordinator of Graduate Studies
MacDonald, T.K.

Professor
Bowie, C., Castelhano, M., Craig, W., Dringenberg, H.C., Fabrigar, L.R., Fekken, G.C., Flanagan, J.R.,  Harkness, K.L., Holden, R.R., Ji, L., Kuhlmeier, V.A.,  Munhall, K.G., Olmstead, M.C., Pukall, C.F., Sabbagh, M.,  Tripp, D.A., Troje, N., van Anders, S.

Associate Professor
Chivers, M., Fitneva, S.A., Hollenstein, T., L.R., Jacobson, J.A.,  Kelley, E.A., MacDonald, T.K., Menard, J., Parker, P., Poppenk, J., Wilson, D.E.

Assistant Professor
Booij, L., Flores, L., Gallivan, J., Hauser, D., Morningstar, M., Salomons, T., Smallwood, J., Stewart, J., Tusche, A.

Professor Emeritus
Beninger, R.J., Berry, J.W., Cuddy, L.L., Donald, M.W., Freedman, N., Frost, B.J., Gekoski, W.L., Knapper, C.K., Knox, V.J., Lederman, S.J., Lindsay, R.C.L., MacLean, A.W., Marshall, W.L., Mewhort, D., Minnes, P.M., Muir, D.W., Murray, D.J., Peters, R.Dev, Quinsey, V.L., Weisman, R.G., Wilde, G.J.S., Zamble, E.

Adjunct Professor
Davidson, J.

Adjunct Associate Professor
Atkinson, J., Harris, G.T., Rice, M.

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Altrows, I.,  Buell, K., Condra, M., Cotton, D.H.G.,  Harrison, A.D., Howell-Moneta, A., Kilik, L., Irwin, J., Looman, J., Marcotte, G., Meyers, S., McKim, W., Phillips, S., Rivera, M., Rossy, N., Rowe, R., Singh, G., Wasson, C., Wilson, J., Valsangkar-Smyth, M., Vetere, C., Villeneuve, D.

Cross-Appointed
Barling, J., Brodt, S.E., Browese, R., Cooper, W., Jones, J., Kirby, J.R., Kisilevsky, B., Milev, R.,  Montgomerie, R., Munoz, D.P., Paré, M., Ratcliffe, L.M., Raver, J., Robertson, R.M., Upitis, R.B., Wade-Woolley, L.


Mission Statement

The mission of the graduate program in psychology is to build on the strength of its students, faculty, and staff in providing an internationally renowned program that is known for: the excellence and integrity of its faculty, students, and training; the innovation and value of its research, scholarship, and skill development; and the fostering of leadership in the delivery of service to the community, to the field of psychology, and to society.

Objectives

The graduate program will be an integrated, organized structure that: develops scientific, critical thinking, and communication skills; promotes freedom of inquiry and expression; attracts high quality students to Queen's University; trains students in skills relevant for employment in a variety of psychological contexts, such as academic, government, and private sector settings; develops leaders in the discipline of psychology in both scientific and applied contexts; achieves an appropriate balance between research and applied components of psychology; responds flexibly to meet the changing needs of students and the profession; promotes professional and scientific responsibility and integrity; provides an environment that respects the equal dignity of all persons and the right to freedom from harassment, intimidation, and discrimination.

Departmental Facilities

Humphrey Hall and the adjacent Craine building contain most of the laboratory, teaching, and technical facilities of the Department of Psychology, facilities for the study of perception and action, including laboratories for the study of optical flow, pattern vision, psychoacoustics and auditory psychophysics, tactile psychophysics and haptic perception, full-body motion, speech synthesis, music perception, eye-hand coordination, facial animation, and human factors relating to teleoperation, and virtual reality. Behavioral neuroscience facilities include multi- and single-unit recordings, intracerebral microdialysis, and image analysis, as well as laboratories for studying animal learning and cognition, avian and insect navigation, and birdsong. There is a human sleep laboratory, and laboratories for the study of human memory, decision and categorization phenomena, and reading processes. There are extensive facilities for research in developmental psychology, from infancy through old age, including laboratories for studying infant perception, language acquisition, lying, aggression and victimization. There are facilities for computer-administered experiments in personality, social interaction and influence, and social judgement, as well as eyewitness identification and jury decision-making.  Research facilities are also available through various community hospitals, federal penitentiaries in the Kingston area, and through other community health-based institutions.

The Department of Psychology also maintains computing resources of varying sizes and configurations located in laboratories. It houses a teaching laboratory for applied statistics in a computing environment. The Department is affiliated with the High-Performance Computing Virtual Laboratory, Canada’s largest academic high-performance computing facility, operated by a consortium of four universities (Queen's, Royal Military College, Ottawa, and Carleton). The Department provides training in parallel computing applied to behavioural phenomena. It also has facilities for the computational modeling of cognitive processes.

Financial Assistance

Federal, Provincial, and University fellowships, scholarships, and bursaries are available. In addition, a number of Departmental assistantships are offered in return for tutorial or research services to the Department. Inquiries regarding eligibility and other information about financial aid should be addressed to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies, Department of Psychology.

Fields of Research

Research is at present being carried out in the following areas: brain function; neuroplasticity; behavioral neuroscience; psychopharmacology; evolutionary psychology; animal learning and behavior; sleep; psychophysics; motor control and action; visual perception and physiology; auditory perception; tactile and haptic perception; multimodal perception; sensory interfaces for teleoperation and virtual-reality systems; perceptual learning; psychology of music; cognitive neuroscience; cognitive processes; computational modelling of basic cognitive processes; decision and classification; memory; psychology of reading; letter and word identification; language learning; psycholinguistics; cognitive development; infant development; developmental disabilities; early experience; aging; social cognition; attitudes; psychometrics; clinical assessment; behaviour analysis; health psychology; child and adult mental health; intervention; rehabilitation; parenting; addiction; eating disorders; psychology and the law; delinquency; eyewitness psychology.

Programs of Study

Applicants are accepted under the general regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. The Department requires applicants to have written the Graduate Record Examination.
Four programs are offered: Cognitive Neuroscience; Clinical; Developmental; and Social-Personality.

Master of Science

The master's program normally extends over two calendar years. For students with an honours degree in psychology the requirements for the master's program are:

  • CORE Human Ethics - 1 online tutorial
  • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) - 3 online tutorials
  • Accessible Instructor for Educators - 1 online tutorial
  • Queen’s Health & Safety Awareness - 1 online tutorial
  • Thesis Proposal to be defended orally
  • Thesis (PSYC-899) to be defended orally
  • PSYC-801* and PSYC-802*
  • Additional coursework as defined by the specific program of study as listed by program below:

Cognitive Neuroscience
The master's program normally extends over two calendar years. For students with an honours degree in psychology the requirements for the master's program are: PSYC-801*, PSYC-802*, PSYC-899 (thesis to be completed by the end of the second year in the program),  two of PSYC-811*, PSYC-812*, PSYC-907*  or PSYC-908*; and two of PSYC-833, PSYC- 917, PSYC- 930, PSYC- 931, PSYC- 934, PSYC- 935, PSYC- 970, or PSYC- 971.  Students working with animals also take QACS-799.

Graduate courses offered by Departments other than Psychology also may be taken to meet the program requirements with the permission of the supervisor and program chair.

Clinical
Over two years, students take PSYC-805*, PSYC-806*,PSYC-809*, PSYC-825, PSYC-827*, PSYC-829*, PSYC-838*, PSYC-839*, PSYC-847* , PSYC-858*,  PSYC-878*.

Developmental

  • One of the following proseminars: PSYC-841*, PSYC-851*, PSYC-852*
  • One of the following Developmental theory courses: PSYC-842*or PSYC-843*
  • One Cognitive Developmental course: PSYC-853*, PSYC-854*, or PSYC-855*
  • One Social/Atypical  Developmental course: PSYC-856*, PSYC-857*, or PSYC-859*

In years when offered, students may take PSYC-959* or PSYC-960* to meet requirements, contingent on the permission of the supervisor and program chair.

Social-Personality

  • Two of the following seminar courses: PSYC-942*, PSYC-943*, PSYC-944*, PSYC-947*, PSYC-948*, and PSYC-949*.  On occasion, we also may offer additional courses that could be applied to the seminar requirement including:  PSYC-945*, PSYC-946*, PSYC-979*, PSYC-980*, PSYC-981*, PSYC-982*.
  • One of: PSYC-940* or PSYC-941*.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral program normally extends over four calendar years. Clinical students frequently complete their internship during their fifth year.  The requirements for the doctoral program are:

  • CORE Human Ethics - 1 online tutorial
  • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) - 3 online tutorials
  • Accessible Instructor for Educators - 1 online tutorial
  • Queen’s Health & Safety Awareness - 1 online tutorial
  • Thesis Proposal to be defended orally
  • Comprehensive Examination to be defended orally
  • Thesis (PSYC-999) to be defended orally
  • Additional coursework as defined by the specific program of study as listed by program below:

Cognitive Neuroscience
PSYC-811*, PSYC-812*, PSYC-907*, and PSYC-908*.  Doctoral students in the Cognitive Neuroscience program participate in the COG-Neuro Research Seminar even after completing PSYC-811*, PSYC-812*, PSYC-907*, and PSYC-908* for as long as they are registered full time in the program.

Clinical
Students take: PSYC-957*, PSYC-968*, PSYC-969*, PSYC-974*, PSYC-989*, PSYC-990*, PSYC-991*, PSYC-992*, PSYC-993. 

Students may choose to take, during years in which they are offered either or both of:  PSYC-994*, PSYC-995*.

Students take three additional half courses from those offered in the Department or, with permission of the Chair of the Clinical program and the Departmental Coordinator of Graduate Studies, from courses offered in other departments.

Developmental

  • One of the following: PSYC-841*, PSYC-851*, PSYC-852*.
  • Two of the following: PSYC-842*, PSYC-843*, PSYC-853*, PSYC-854*, PSYC-855*, PSYC-856*, PSYC-857*, PSYC-859* selected in consultation with the student's supervisor and Program Chair

In years when offered, students may take PSYC-959* or PSYC-960* to meet requirements, contingent on the permission of the supervisor and program chair.

Social-Personality
Students who have a Master’s degree in Social Psychology take either PSYC-940* or PSYC-941*  one seminar course from PSYC-846*, PSYC-942*, PSYC-943*, PSYC-944*, PSYC-945*, PSYC-946*, PSYC-947*, PSYC-948*, PSYC-979*, PSYC-980*, PSYC-981*, and PSYC-982*; and two additional courses either from the seminar list or selected in consultation with the student's supervisor and the Program Chair.  One of those additional courses could be PSYC-901*, which alternates every other year with PSYC-940*.

Students who do not have a Master's degree in Social Psychology take either PSYC-940* or PSYC-941*  and three courses from  the seminar list noted above.

Professional and Ethical Behaviour

Students are expected to act in a professional and ethical manner in accordance with the current Standards of Professional Conduct (College of Psychologists of Ontario) and the Canadian Psychological Association Code of Ethics. It is very important, therefore, that students be familiar with these documents and clarify any concerns they have with their supervisor. A failure to show professional and ethical behaviour may provide grounds for dismissal.