Studies in National and International Development

STUDIES IN

National and International Development

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All SNID lectures are held Thursdays from 1:00 PM until 2:30 PM
in Mackintosh-Corry Hall D214 unless otherwise noted and are free and open to the public.


Havana’s Casa de Las Américas:
An Institution of South-South Cooperation


Title: Havana’s Casa de Las Américas: An Institution of South-South Cooperation

Date: March 26, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Gerardo Hernández Bencomo, Casa de Las Américas, Havana, Cuba

Since its inception in April 1959, Casa de Las Américas has become one of the most significant cultural institutions in Cuba. It promotes ties between Latin American countries in the cultural, literary and social realm.  In this presentation Gerardo Hernández Bencomo will discuss the history and current realities of Cuban cultural production and relations with other countries in Latin America.

 

 

 
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Gerardo Hernández Bencomo, Casa de Las Américas, Havana, Cuba

Gerardo Hernández Bencomo is an external relations specialist at Casa de Las Américas. He is the 2020 Queen’s - University of Havana exchange visitor.

 

Sexual Dissidence as a Method of Analysis for Queer Globalizations


Title: Sexual Dissidence as a Method of Analysis for Queer Globalizations

Date: March 19, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  habibe burcu baba, Queen's University

This talk draws a map of queer globalizations by situating Turkey, a Muslim majority and secular nation state grappling with the influences of global neoliberal capitalism and the rise of authoritarianism. Through vignettes of ‘lived experiences of queerness’ from the lives of sexual dissidents in the country, new local identities such as gey, lubunya, donme, bac emerge as alternatives to the established queer categories in Western locations. Sexual dissidents engage in a bargain with the sex/gender system and thread cisheteropatriarchy strategically in different moments of their lives. Deploying ‘Sexual Dissidence’ as a tool of queer ethnographic methodology, burcu will draw from participant observation, focus group interviews with LGBT activists, and in-depth interviews with sexual dissidents with children.

 

 
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habibe burcu baba, Queen's University

burcu baba is a sociologist working in the fields of feminist and queer studies.  Her research considers ties of kinship and affinity in the lives of sexual dissidents in Muslim contexts in relation to the racialization of Islam, the rise of authoritarianism and queer liberalism. Her most recent project pertains to the queer and trans community organizing work in Turkey as a way of holding onto life through prefigurative politics. burcu completed her PhD at the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University and she has been teaching at Gender Studies as an Adjunct Associate Professor. She is also the Faculty Co-Chair of Steering Committee in Cultural Studies Programme. 

 

Reproductive Empires: Charting the Political Economy of ART in the Global South


Title: Reproductive Empires: Charting the Political Economy of ART in the Global South

Date: March 12, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Bronwyn Parry, King's College London

The global use of Assistive Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) to address structural infertility has burgeoned since the early 2000s, with India a prime location for service delivery. The scale of expansion has resulted in a proliferation of non-standard and unethical practices that have, perversely, lead to increases in patient infertility. Senior Indian reproductive specialists seek to generate their own ‘reproductive empires’ by further expanding service provision into emerging markets such as Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. This talk explores these new empires and their political and economic drivers: the neoliberalism of health service provision in India; the privatisation and corporatisation of care; gendered competitiveness; and cultural preferences for biologically related children.

 

 
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Bronwyn Parry, King's College London

Bronwyn Parry is Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine and Head of the School of Global Affairs at Kings College London. Bronwyn is interested in the social, ethical and legal implications of transforming human tissues and DNA into bio-information that can be circulated across multiple platforms and into multiple markets simultaneously. Her books Trading the Genome: Investigating the Commodification of Bio-information (2004) and Bio-Information (2017) investigate the emergence of new global economies in bioinformation, revealing how tissue samples and DNA segue into and out of the commodity form at different moments and places in their careers.

 

Market Reforms, Resource Extraction, and Social Movements in Bangladesh


Title: Market Reforms, Resource Extraction, and Social Movements in Bangladesh

Date: March 5, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  M. Omar Faruque, Queen's University

This talk will highlight social movements against foreign investment-driven resource extraction projects in Bangladesh. Left-leaning political groups have mobilized against market-oriented energy policy reforms, although reforms have gone largely unchallenged since the late 1970s. I draw on the scholarship on political economy and institutional causes of development to make nuanced sense of this puzzle. I argue it is not market reform per se that triggers Bangladeshi anti-corporate social movements. Extractive political institutions and the corruption of political and bureaucratic elites are more significant drivers. More specifically, activists’ perception that extractive political institutions fail to reap the ostensible benefits of market reform for the masses shapes their framing of grievances and their movement agenda. 

 

 
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M. Omar Faruque, Queen's University

M. Omar Faruque is SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University. Earlier, he was an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Dhaka and Research Associate in Agriculture and Rural Development Division at the Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies. His main areas of research interests are political sociology, development sociology, environmental sociology, and global & transnational sociology. His current research project examines energy politics and environmental movements in Bangladesh.

 

Canada is so Polite: Prisons, Deportation and Policing Blackness in Canada


Title: Canada is so Polite:
Prisons, Deportation and Policing Blackness in Canada

Date: February 27, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  El Jones, Mount St. Vincent University

“El Jones is the Black liberation visionary of our time” 
- Robyn Maynard, author of Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to the Present
 

 

 
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El Jones, Mount St. Vincent University

The former Poet Laureate of Halifax, El Jones is also a journalist, activist, and academic. She holds the Nancy Chair in Women’s Studies at Mount St Vincent University in Halifax. A well-known researcher in the fields of prison justice and anti racism, she has addressed audiences all over Canada. 

 

The Syria/Turkey Border as Palimpsest of Sovereignty: The Spatial Life of Contraband Commerce between Anatolia and the Levant


Title: The Syria/Turkey Border as Palimpsest of Sovereignty: The Spatial Life of Contraband Commerce between Anatolia and the Levant

Date: February 6, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Emrah Yıldız, Northwestern University

This talk examines the formation of the Syria-Turkey border as a palimpsest of sovereignty—defined here as a temporal and spatial nesting of ideologies, goods and people on the move. It particularly foregrounds how cross-border contraband merchants have helped produce this maelstrom on a regional scale. It argues that at important historical junctures contraband commerce between modern Turkey and Syria came to link regimes of value and territorialization, border delineation and land dispossession, and economic informalization and political treason.

 

 
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Emrah Yıldız, Northwestern University

Emrah Yıldız is Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. He is a historically attuned cultural anthropologist, studying routes of religious, commercial and political mobility between Iran, Turkey and Syria. His research lies at the intersection of historiography and ethnography of borders and their states; anthropology of pilgrimage and visitation in Islam as well as the study of currencies and contraband commerce in political economy.

 

Landscapes of Development: Canadian Development Thought and Indonesian-Occupied East Timor, 1975-99


Title: Landscapes of Development: Canadian Development Thought and Indonesian-Occupied East Timor, 1975-99

Date: January 23, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  David Webster, Bishop's University

Asia’s poorest country today is Timor-Leste (East Timor). Its development is heavily influenced by the historical legacies of Indonesian occupation, when scholars of development highlighted its landscape as a reason the country could never be economically viable, while independence activists stressed a history of agrarian self-reliance. Clashing images of the land shaped debates over the country’s political future. Canadian government interest concentrated on possible development work, but humanitarian debates were inevitably entangled with political struggle in both Timor and Ottawa.

 

 
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David Webster, Bishop's University

David Webster is a professor of history and global studies at Bishop's University. He is author of Fire and the Full Moon: Canada and Indonesia, 1975-99 and editor of Flowers in the Wall: Truth and Reconciliation in Timor-Leste, Indonesia and Melanesia. Most recently he co-edited A Samaritan State Revisited: Historical Perspectives on Canadian Foreign Aid. This paper draws from his forthcoming book Challenge the Strong Wind: Canada and East Timor, 1975-99.

 

Nationalization: A Strategy For or Against Decarbonization?


Title: Nationalization: A Strategy For or Against Decarbonization?

Date: January 16, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Kyla Tienhaara, Queen's University

This talk will explore recent calls, from opposite ends of the political spectrum, for the nationalization of fossil fuel assets in the context of the climate emergency. Some pundits and policymakers are arguing that these assets need to be nationalized to keep them operating as changing market conditions make investments in the sector unprofitable, uninsurable, or uncompetitive with renewable energy. Others are pushing for the nationalization of fossil energy assets as a strategy to achieve deep decarbonization.

 

 
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Kyla Tienhaara, Queen's University

Dr. Kyla Tienhaara is a Canada Research Chair in Economy and Environment and Assistant Professor in the School of Environmental Studies and Department of Global Development Studies. Her research examines the intersection between environmental governance and the global economic system. Her most recent book Green Keynesianism and the Global Financial Crisis explores the lessons learned from green stimulus programs in 2008/09 and how a comprehensive Green New Deal could help to deliver a Just Transition to a low carbon economy.
 

 

Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada


Title:  Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada

Date: November 21, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Joan Kuyek

Joan Kuyek has decades of experience helping to protect Canadian communities from the negative impacts of the mining industry. She will briefly share what she learned: how the Canadian industry is structured, how it maintains power, and how affected communities resist whether they want to stop a mine before it starts, to force governments to protect them, or to get an abandoned mine cleaned-up.

 

   
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Joan Kuyek

Joan Kuyek is a community-focused mining analyst, community organizer and adult educator living in Ottawa. She was the founding National Co-ordinator of MiningWatch Canada from 1999-2009. She is the author of Unearthing Justice: How to Protect your Community from the Mining Industry (fall 2019) and Community Organizing: A Holistic Approach (2011) and a number of other books and publications. Before moving to Ottawa, she was a community organizer and facilitator for almost 30 years in Sudbury and Kingston.

 

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