Studies in National and International Development

STUDIES IN

National and International Development

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All SNID lectures are held Thursdays from 1:00 PM until 2:30 PM
in Mackintosh-Corry Hall D214 unless otherwise noted and are free and open to the public.


The Syria/Turkey Border as Palimpsest of Sovereignty: The Spatial Life of Contraband Commerce between Anatolia and the Levant


Title: The Syria/Turkey Border as Palimpsest of Sovereignty: The Spatial Life of Contraband Commerce between Anatolia and the Levant

Date: February 6, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Emrah Yıldız, Northwestern University

This talk examines the formation of the Syria-Turkey border as a palimpsest of sovereignty—defined here as a temporal and spatial nesting of ideologies, goods and people on the move. It particularly foregrounds how cross-border contraband merchants have helped produce this maelstrom on a regional scale. It argues that at important historical junctures contraband commerce between modern Turkey and Syria came to link regimes of value and territorialization, border delineation and land dispossession, and economic informalization and political treason.

 

 
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Emrah Yıldız, Northwestern University

Emrah Yıldız is Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. He is a historically attuned cultural anthropologist, studying routes of religious, commercial and political mobility between Iran, Turkey and Syria. His research lies at the intersection of historiography and ethnography of borders and their states; anthropology of pilgrimage and visitation in Islam as well as the study of currencies and contraband commerce in political economy.

 

Landscapes of Development: Canadian Development Thought and Indonesian-Occupied East Timor, 1975-99


Title: Landscapes of Development: Canadian Development Thought and Indonesian-Occupied East Timor, 1975-99

Date: January 23, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  David Webster, Bishop's University

Asia’s poorest country today is Timor-Leste (East Timor). Its development is heavily influenced by the historical legacies of Indonesian occupation, when scholars of development highlighted its landscape as a reason the country could never be economically viable, while independence activists stressed a history of agrarian self-reliance. Clashing images of the land shaped debates over the country’s political future. Canadian government interest concentrated on possible development work, but humanitarian debates were inevitably entangled with political struggle in both Timor and Ottawa.

 

 
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David Webster, Bishop's University

David Webster is a professor of history and global studies at Bishop's University. He is author of Fire and the Full Moon: Canada and Indonesia, 1975-99 and editor of Flowers in the Wall: Truth and Reconciliation in Timor-Leste, Indonesia and Melanesia. Most recently he co-edited A Samaritan State Revisited: Historical Perspectives on Canadian Foreign Aid. This paper draws from his forthcoming book Challenge the Strong Wind: Canada and East Timor, 1975-99.

 

Nationalization: A Strategy For or Against Decarbonization?


Title: Nationalization: A Strategy For or Against Decarbonization?

Date: January 16, 2020
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Kyla Tienhaara, Queen's University

This talk will explore recent calls, from opposite ends of the political spectrum, for the nationalization of fossil fuel assets in the context of the climate emergency. Some pundits and policymakers are arguing that these assets need to be nationalized to keep them operating as changing market conditions make investments in the sector unprofitable, uninsurable, or uncompetitive with renewable energy. Others are pushing for the nationalization of fossil energy assets as a strategy to achieve deep decarbonization.

 

 
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Kyla Tienhaara, Queen's University

Dr. Kyla Tienhaara is a Canada Research Chair in Economy and Environment and Assistant Professor in the School of Environmental Studies and Department of Global Development Studies. Her research examines the intersection between environmental governance and the global economic system. Her most recent book Green Keynesianism and the Global Financial Crisis explores the lessons learned from green stimulus programs in 2008/09 and how a comprehensive Green New Deal could help to deliver a Just Transition to a low carbon economy.
 

 

Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada


Title:  Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada

Date: November 21, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Joan Kuyek

Joan Kuyek has decades of experience helping to protect Canadian communities from the negative impacts of the mining industry. She will briefly share what she learned: how the Canadian industry is structured, how it maintains power, and how affected communities resist whether they want to stop a mine before it starts, to force governments to protect them, or to get an abandoned mine cleaned-up.

 

   
Diana Cordoba

Joan Kuyek

Joan Kuyek is a community-focused mining analyst, community organizer and adult educator living in Ottawa. She was the founding National Co-ordinator of MiningWatch Canada from 1999-2009. She is the author of Unearthing Justice: How to Protect your Community from the Mining Industry (fall 2019) and Community Organizing: A Holistic Approach (2011) and a number of other books and publications. Before moving to Ottawa, she was a community organizer and facilitator for almost 30 years in Sudbury and Kingston.

 

Precarious Living: 
Syrians in Turkey


                                                                                                 

            

Title:  Precarious Living: Syrians in Turkey

            

            Date: November 7, 2019
            Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
            Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
            Speaker:  Kim Rygiel, Wilfred Laurier University

            

Approximately 5 million Syrians are currently displaced, living without adequate protection, and struggling to access residency, rights, and citizenship in the broader context of migration governance. This talk looks at the Turkish case of hosting Syrians to reflect on international and national commitments to refugee protection and the relation between precarity and refugees’ everyday living, and migrant journeys. Under Turkey’s temporary protection regime, Syrians are not recognized as refugees and only afforded the legal right to temporarily reside within Turkey. This presentation will discuss how temporary protection diminishes international protection to Syrians and increases their legal insecurities.  

            

            

            

 

            

   

                                                                       

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Kim Rygiel, Wilfred Laurier University

            

Kim Rygiel is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and associate director of the International Migration Research Centre at Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada. She is an associate editor of the journal Citizenship Studies. Her research focuses on critical migration, citizenship, and border politics.  She is the author of Globalizing Citizenship (UBC Press, 2010) and co-editor (with Peter Nyers) of Citizenship, Migrant Activism, and the Politics of Movement (Routledge, 2012).

            

 

The Canadian Federal Election: What Just Happened?


Title:  The Canadian Federal Election: What Just Happened?

Date: October 31, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Georgina Riel, Hugh Segal, Kyla Tienhaara, and Colin Grey, chaired by Jonathan Rose

Join SNID for a post-election panel analyzing the 2019 Canadian federal election. The panel will feature Georgina Riel, (Kingston political commentator), Hugh Segal (Queen’s School of Policy Studies), Kyla Tienhaara (Global Development Studies, environmental specialist), and Colin Grey (Queen’s Law School, immigration law specialist), and be chaired by Jonathan Rose (Queen's Department of Political Studies). 

 


We Are Caretakers of Our Water


Title:  We Are Caretakers of Our Water

Date: October 17, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Poh-Gek Forkert, Queen's University

A small rural community and a nearby First Nations community combined forces to fight a proposal to expand a local dumpsite into a mega-landfill – a project with a high potential to pollute their water. It was a pitched battle that started in 1985 and lasted for decades. They encountered many obstacles – some from their own government –as they fought together to protect their water. In 2006, the government terminated the proposed expansion. It looks tentatively like the battle has been won but to this day water contamination issues remained unresolved.

 

 
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Poh-Gek Forkert, Queen's University

Poh-Gek Forkert came to Queen’s in 1982 after postdoctoral training in the United States. She is a research scientist and toxicologist who has published more than eighty papers and book chapters on the disposition and metabolism of toxic chemicals. For the past ten years, she has worked as an expert consultant with environmental lawyers and citizen groups and has testified at public hearings of the Environmental Review Tribunal. She is Professor Emerita at Queen’s University. Her book Fighting Dirty has recently been shortlisted for the Speaker’s Book Prize.

 

The Growth and Development of Chinese NGOs Domestically and Abroad, and its Implications for International Development


Title:  The Growth and Development of Chinese NGOs Domestically and Abroad, and its Implications for International Development

Date: October 10, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Reza Hasmath, University of Alberta

This talk looks at the strategies Chinese NGOs employ to survive and operate in an authoritarian institutional environment. What happens when Chinese NGOs that are born and socialized in such a domestic context, "go out" to other jurisdictions with similar or varying regime types? Finally, I will suggest that the internationalization of Chinese NGOs will foster a more pluralized global civil society. Ultimately, this will require us to rethink salient precepts and practices in international development. 

 

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Reza Hasmath, University of Alberta

Reza Hasmath (Ph.D., Cambridge) is a Professor in Political Science at the University of Alberta. He was previously a faculty member at the Universities of Oxford, Melbourne, and Toronto. His award-winning research – supported by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation – has recently appeared in Public Administration and Development, Journal of Social Policy, International Political Science Review, Voluntas, and Development Policy Review.


Oil Palm Plantations in Forest Territories: Environmentalism, Agrarian Politics and the Transformation of Traditional Livelihoods in the Brazilian Amazon


Title:  Oil Palm Plantations in Forest Territories: Environmentalism, Agrarian Politics and the Transformation of Traditional Livelihoods in the Brazilian Amazon

Date: October 3, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Diana Cordoba Queen's University

The current oil palm boom is arguably one of the most rapid agroenvironmental transformations in the Brazilian Amazon. Little is known about how oil palm plantations impact traditional livelihoods in forest territories. This talk analyzes geo-historical context and changes in livelihoods of differentiated social groups; explores the impact of recent expansion of oil palm in the state of Pará, Brazil, and outlines some of the challenges forest communities face when trying to claim their rights to defend nature and their livelihoods. This research speaks to the production and transformation of particular naturesocial configurations in the Amazon.

 

 
Diana Cordoba

Diana Cordoba, Queen's University

Diana Cordoba is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University. Her research draws on critical agrarian studies and political ecology approaches to emphasize the interactions between local situations and wider economic and political processes in which power influences the (uneven) distribution of resources and shapes development discourses, interventions and institutions. Dr. Cordoba is the author of Participation, Politics, and Technology: Agrarian development in post-neoliberal Bolivia.

 

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