Studies in National and International Development

STUDIES IN

National and International Development

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All SNID lectures are held Thursdays from 1:00 PM until 2:30 PM
in Mackintosh-Corry Hall D214 unless otherwise noted and are free and open to the public.


Policy Engagement as Prefiguration? Reflecting on civil society participation in Canada’s national food policy dialogue


Title:  Policy Engagement as Prefiguration? Reflecting on civil society participation in Canada’s national food policy dialogue

Date: February 28, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Amanda Wilson, St Patrick’s College

Movements to bring about more healthy, sustainable and just food systems are increasing turning their attention to food system governance as an important arena through which to address pressing challenges and inequalities. Reflecting on the efforts of food movement organizations to participate in, and influence, the development of a national food policy for Canada, I consider the strengths and limitations of this policy engagement, and ask whether the process of policy building holds prefigurative promise in modeling and experimenting alternative food futures.

 

 

 

 

 
Amanda Wilson, St Patrick’s College

Amanda Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Innovation at Saint Paul University in Ottawa.  Her research is focused on food movements and alternative food networks, collective and cooperative organizational forms and questions related to prefiguration and enacting a politics of possibility. Outside of academia, she has worked with several non-governmental organizations in the areas of policy analysis, research, network coordination and popular education, and is a long-time community organizer and activist in Ottawa.

 

Structures of Indifference: An Indigenous Life and Death in a Canadian City


Title:  Structures of Indifference: An Indigenous Life and Death in a Canadian City

Date:  February 14, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Mary Jane McCallum, Department of History, University of Winnipeg 

 

Abstract to follow

 

 

 

 

 
 

Mary Jane McCallum, Department of History, University of Winnipeg  , BIO TO FOLLOW

 

Distributing Reproduction, Mining Liquid Gold: Uneven Geographies of Human Milk Exchange


Title:  Distributing Reproduction, Mining Liquid Gold: Uneven Geographies of Human Milk Exchange

Date:  January 24, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Carolyn Prouse, Geography, Queen’s University

Human milk is being shuttled through geographically extensive networks of glass jars, pasteurization machines, and medical clinics. In this talk I trace how and where human milk is exchanged. I ask, specifically, how are new markets in milk shaped by processes of uneven development, technologies of biomedicalization, and racialized/gendered/religious notions of good mothering? By tracing human milk through American for-profit corporations and the emerging leaders Brazil and South Africa, I argue for taking seriously human milk infrastructure as a form of distributed reproduction that shapes living-being in cities in uneven ways.

 

 

 

 

Carolyn Prouse, Geography, Queen’s University

Carolyn Prouse is an Assistant Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University. As an urban economic geographer she works at the intersection of postcolonial, decolonial, critical race, and feminist theory. Her research focuses on the politics and economics of urban infrastructural development, with a particular interest in infrastructures of slum-upgrading, experimentation, and social reproduction. Carolyn’s research is located in Canada, the United States, Brazil, and South Africa.


Moving Against the System: The 1968 Congress of Black Writers and the Making of Global Consciousness


Title:  Moving Against the System: The 1968 Congress of Black Writers and the Making of Global Consciousness

Date:  January 17, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: David Austin, John Abbott College, Montreal 

 

Abstract to follow

 

 

 


Venezuela, How a Democracy was Lost


Title:  Venezuela, How a Democracy was Lost

Date:  January 10, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Rafael  Osío-Cabrices, Montreal Journalist

Internationally, Venezuela is described as the Country with both the world's largest proved oil reserves and worst-performing economy. But behind the recent economic collapse and mass migration, lies the story of how a democracy that was exemplary in South America turned into a dictatorship. Venezuela offers an example of how a Western society can lose its democracy in the 21st century, once the public sphere and the civil liberties are displaced by organized hate speech and journalism is declared the enemy of the state.  

 

 

 

 

 
Susan Belyea

Rafael  Osío-Cabrices

Rafael Osío-Cabrices is a Venezuelan writer, author of six non-fiction books, who worked as a journalist in press, magazines, and radio for 20 years before moving to Canada in 2014. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and The World Post, among several media outlets in English and Spanish. 

 

No es fácil: The Everyday Work of Putting Food on the Table in Canada and Cuba


Title:  No es fácil: The Everyday Work of Putting Food on the Table in Canada and Cuba

Date: November 22, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Susan Belyea, Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University

Drawing on my doctoral research in this talk I explore dimensions of the everyday work that people living on low incomes do to put food on the table in two sites – Kingston, Ontario and Havana Cuba. The policy environments that shape these two food-access landscapes couldn’t be more different.  But descriptions of the experience of worrying about feeding the family share surprising similarities.  What can the stories I heard about creative strategies for managing deprivation teach us about the respective roles of the state, the market, and civil society in addressing poverty and food insecurity in a world increasingly characterized by precarious economies and tattered social security structures?

 

 

 
Susan Belyea

Susan Belyea, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen’s University
Susan Belyea is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University.  Her doctoral research explored the daily experience of food insecurity in the different policy environments of Canada and Cuba. She teaches on social and political responses to food insecurity, and global food security and the environment, and is a frequent guest lecturer in other courses and in the community. Susan is active in local anti-poverty and food security projects, and was the founder and first executive director of Loving Spoonful, a Kingston-based food justice organization.
 

 

Migration Has Stripped Us of Our Manhood: Exploring the Contradictions of Failed Masculinity Among Undocumented South Asian Male Migrants in Greece


Title:  Migration Has Stripped Us of Our Manhood: Exploring the Contradictions of Failed Masculinity Among Undocumented South Asian Male Migrants in Greece

Date: November 15, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Reena Kukreja, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University

Large numbers of undocumented male migrants from the South Asian countries of Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India work in agriculture or in the informal economy in Greece. In this talk, Dr. Kukreja discusses how relational hierarchies of masculinities shape these men’s encounters with their Greek employers, their compatriots in Greece, and their families and communities back home. What strategies do they adopt to affirm their manhood?? How does the fluid category of namard or ‘failed’ masculinity that these undocumented South Asian male migrants fear being labelled with shape their gender relations, desire for family and companionship, or even their return journeys?

 

South Asian Male Migrants in Greece

 

 
Reena Kukreja

Reena Kukreja, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University
Dr. Reena Kukreja is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University and a Visiting Fellow at the International Migration Research Centre at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo. She divides time between teaching, research, and filmmaking. She has directed several award-winning documentaries on rural women in India and South Asia. She has published in journals such as Modern Asian Studies and the Journal of Intercultural Studies.

 

Migrant Dreams in Transnational Labour Regimes


Title: Migrant Dreams in Transnational Labour Regimes

Date: November 8, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Geraldina Polanco, Labour Studies, McMaster University

Employers in the bottom rungs of the Canadian labour market are benefitting from a global economy that capitalizes on people’s dreams. Profit-driven actors leverage sentiments–in the form of desires and dreams–to encourage migrants to engage in labour migration. Drawing from multi-sited, ethnographic field research conducted in the Philippines, Mexico and western Canada, I show how the ideas and imaginations associated with Canada, in concert with activities on the part of sending and receiving states, shape desires amongst migrants to pursue the promises they associate with the Canadian dream. The Canadian dream acts as a powerful cultural force drawing migrants to Canada.

 

Clarke Image

 

 
Geraldina Polanco

Geraldina Polanco, Labour Studies, McMaster University

Geraldina Polanco is an Assistant Professor of Labour Studies and Sociology at McMaster University. Dr. Polanco’s scholarship is situated at the intersection of migration and work. She has published in venues like Third World Quarterly (2016), Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power (2017), and Journal of International Migration and Integration (2016), contributing to knowledge in the areas of citizenship studies, work and employment, globalization, and gender and ethnic relations. She is currently completing a monograph on fast food labour migration, under contract with the University of Toronto press.
 


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