Studies in National and International Development

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National and International Development

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2018-2019 LECTURES

Is Heritage an Agent of Gentrification? The Lachine Canal and the Transformation of Montreal's Southwest


Title:  Is Heritage an Agent of Gentrification? The Lachine Canal and the Transformation of Montreal's Southwest

Date: March 21, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Steven High. Concordia University

Abstract to follow

 

 

 

 
Steven High, Concordia University
 

Social Movements in Turkey


Title:  Social Movements in Turkey

Date: March 14, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Ayca Tomac, Queen's University

In the "Trump Age,” how have right-wing populist leaders from around the world - from Ontario to the US, from Brazil to India - garnered massive support? This talk focuses on Erdogan’s Turkey as a case study. I provide an overview of how neoliberal populism has been utilized and
operationalized in Turkey. This hegemonic technique has consolidated its power especially among the working class, urban poor and the precariate. I will also highlight the everyday experiences of a charity economy as a by-product of neoliberal populism.

Social Movements in Turkey Image

 

 
Ayca Tomac

Ayca Tomac, Queen's University

Ayca Tomac received her PhD from the program of Cultural Studies in 2017. She works as a term adjunct in Global Development Studies at Queen’s and she is the coordinator of OPIRG Kingston. Her research focuses on Solidarity Praxis, Politics of Alliance, Anti-Oppressive Pedagogies in Social Movements, Cultures of Resistance, Dissidence in Turkey, in the Middle East and the Mediterranean.

 

Policy Engagement as Prefiguration? Reflecting on civil society participation in Canada’s national food policy dialogue


Title:  Policy Engagement as Prefiguration? Reflecting on civil society participation in Canada’s national food policy dialogue

Date: February 28, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker:  Amanda Wilson, St Patrick’s College

Movements to bring about more healthy, sustainable and just food systems are increasing turning their attention to food system governance as an important arena through which to address pressing challenges and inequalities. Reflecting on the efforts of food movement organizations to participate in, and influence, the development of a national food policy for Canada, I consider the strengths and limitations of this policy engagement, and ask whether the process of policy building holds prefigurative promise in modeling and experimenting alternative food futures.

 

 

 

 

 
Amanda Wilson, St Patrick’s College

Amanda Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Innovation at Saint Paul University in Ottawa.  Her research is focused on food movements and alternative food networks, collective and cooperative organizational forms and questions related to prefiguration and enacting a politics of possibility. Outside of academia, she has worked with several non-governmental organizations in the areas of policy analysis, research, network coordination and popular education, and is a long-time community organizer and activist in Ottawa.

 

Structures of Indifference: An Indigenous Life and Death in a Canadian City


Title:  Structures of Indifference: An Indigenous Life and Death in a Canadian City

Date:  February 14, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Mary Jane McCallum, Department of History, University of Winnipeg 

 

Abstract to follow

 

 

 

 

 
 

Mary Jane McCallum, Department of History, University of Winnipeg  , BIO TO FOLLOW

 

Distributing Reproduction, Mining Liquid Gold: Uneven Geographies of Human Milk Exchange


Title:  Distributing Reproduction, Mining Liquid Gold: Uneven Geographies of Human Milk Exchange

Date:  January 24, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Carolyn Prouse, Geography, Queen’s University

Human milk is being shuttled through geographically extensive networks of glass jars, pasteurization machines, and medical clinics. In this talk I trace how and where human milk is exchanged. I ask, specifically, how are new markets in milk shaped by processes of uneven development, technologies of biomedicalization, and racialized/gendered/religious notions of good mothering? By tracing human milk through American for-profit corporations and the emerging leaders Brazil and South Africa, I argue for taking seriously human milk infrastructure as a form of distributed reproduction that shapes living-being in cities in uneven ways.

 

 

 

 

Carolyn Prouse, Geography, Queen’s University

Carolyn Prouse is an Assistant Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University. As an urban economic geographer she works at the intersection of postcolonial, decolonial, critical race, and feminist theory. Her research focuses on the politics and economics of urban infrastructural development, with a particular interest in infrastructures of slum-upgrading, experimentation, and social reproduction. Carolyn’s research is located in Canada, the United States, Brazil, and South Africa.


Moving Against the System: The 1968 Congress of Black Writers and the Making of Global Consciousness


Title:  Moving Against the System: The 1968 Congress of Black Writers and the Making of Global Consciousness

Date:  January 17, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: David Austin, John Abbott College, Montreal 

 

Abstract to follow

 

 

 


Venezuela, How a Democracy was Lost


Title:  Venezuela, How a Democracy was Lost

Date:  January 10, 2019
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Rafael  Osío-Cabrices, Montreal Journalist

Internationally, Venezuela is described as the Country with both the world's largest proved oil reserves and worst-performing economy. But behind the recent economic collapse and mass migration, lies the story of how a democracy that was exemplary in South America turned into a dictatorship. Venezuela offers an example of how a Western society can lose its democracy in the 21st century, once the public sphere and the civil liberties are displaced by organized hate speech and journalism is declared the enemy of the state.  

 

 

 

 

 
Susan Belyea

Rafael  Osío-Cabrices

Rafael Osío-Cabrices is a Venezuelan writer, author of six non-fiction books, who worked as a journalist in press, magazines, and radio for 20 years before moving to Canada in 2014. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and The World Post, among several media outlets in English and Spanish. 

 

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