Studies in National and International Development

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National and International Development

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2018-2019 LECTURES

No es fácil: The Everyday Work of Putting Food on the Table in Canada and Cuba


Title:  No es fácil: The Everyday Work of Putting Food on the Table in Canada and Cuba

Date: November 22, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Susan Belyea, Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University

Drawing on my doctoral research in this talk I explore dimensions of the everyday work that people living on low incomes do to put food on the table in two sites – Kingston, Ontario and Havana Cuba. The policy environments that shape these two food-access landscapes couldn’t be more different.  But descriptions of the experience of worrying about feeding the family share surprising similarities.  What can the stories I heard about creative strategies for managing deprivation teach us about the respective roles of the state, the market, and civil society in addressing poverty and food insecurity in a world increasingly characterized by precarious economies and tattered social security structures?

 

 

 
Susan Belyea

Susan Belyea, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen’s University
Susan Belyea is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University.  Her doctoral research explored the daily experience of food insecurity in the different policy environments of Canada and Cuba. She teaches on social and political responses to food insecurity, and global food security and the environment, and is a frequent guest lecturer in other courses and in the community. Susan is active in local anti-poverty and food security projects, and was the founder and first executive director of Loving Spoonful, a Kingston-based food justice organization.
 

 

Migration Has Stripped Us of Our Manhood: Exploring the Contradictions of Failed Masculinity Among Undocumented South Asian Male Migrants in Greece


Title:  Migration Has Stripped Us of Our Manhood: Exploring the Contradictions of Failed Masculinity Among Undocumented South Asian Male Migrants in Greece

Date: November 15, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Reena Kukreja, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University

Large numbers of undocumented male migrants from the South Asian countries of Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India work in agriculture or in the informal economy in Greece. In this talk, Dr. Kukreja discusses how relational hierarchies of masculinities shape these men’s encounters with their Greek employers, their compatriots in Greece, and their families and communities back home. What strategies do they adopt to affirm their manhood?? How does the fluid category of namard or ‘failed’ masculinity that these undocumented South Asian male migrants fear being labelled with shape their gender relations, desire for family and companionship, or even their return journeys?

 

South Asian Male Migrants in Greece

 

 
Reena Kukreja

Reena Kukreja, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University
Dr. Reena Kukreja is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University and a Visiting Fellow at the International Migration Research Centre at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo. She divides time between teaching, research, and filmmaking. She has directed several award-winning documentaries on rural women in India and South Asia. She has published in journals such as Modern Asian Studies and the Journal of Intercultural Studies.

 

Migrant Dreams in Transnational Labour Regimes


Title: Migrant Dreams in Transnational Labour Regimes

Date: November 8, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Geraldina Polanco, Labour Studies, McMaster University

Employers in the bottom rungs of the Canadian labour market are benefitting from a global economy that capitalizes on people’s dreams. Profit-driven actors leverage sentiments–in the form of desires and dreams–to encourage migrants to engage in labour migration. Drawing from multi-sited, ethnographic field research conducted in the Philippines, Mexico and western Canada, I show how the ideas and imaginations associated with Canada, in concert with activities on the part of sending and receiving states, shape desires amongst migrants to pursue the promises they associate with the Canadian dream. The Canadian dream acts as a powerful cultural force drawing migrants to Canada.

 

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Geraldina Polanco

Geraldina Polanco, Labour Studies, McMaster University

Geraldina Polanco is an Assistant Professor of Labour Studies and Sociology at McMaster University. Dr. Polanco’s scholarship is situated at the intersection of migration and work. She has published in venues like Third World Quarterly (2016), Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power (2017), and Journal of International Migration and Integration (2016), contributing to knowledge in the areas of citizenship studies, work and employment, globalization, and gender and ethnic relations. She is currently completing a monograph on fast food labour migration, under contract with the University of Toronto press.
 


Economies and extractions in Northern Canada


Title: Economies and extractions in Northern Canada

Date: November 1, 2018, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Rebecca Hall, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University

For Canadian political and economic interests, the north has simultaneously acted as a repository of potential wealth (in the form of extractable resources), and of identities: a symbolic marker for the imagined rugged and socially responsible Canada. The Canadian State has managed the tensions between these two projects –extracting northern resources while ostensibly respecting northern Indigenous socio-economies and ecologies – through different approaches to Indigenous labour and the northern mixed economy over time. These approaches represent shifting tactics that rhetorically recognize Indigenous rights, but are, in practice, new forms of settler colonial dispossession and exploitation.

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Rebecca Hall

Rebecca Hall, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University

Rebecca Hall is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University. Her scholarly publications have examined multiple sites of contemporary de/colonizing struggle in Canada, including resource extraction, property relations, caring labours and interpersonal violence. Her doctoral dissertation, awarded a Governor General’s Gold Medal in 2018, examines the impact of the northern diamond industry on Indigenous women.

 

Decentring the Newspaper Columnist: Feminist Engagement with Public Intellectual Work in the Caribbean


Title: Decentring the Newspaper Columnist: Feminist Engagement with Public Intellectual Work in the Caribbean

Date: October 18, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Alissa Trotz, Women and Gender Studies/Caribbean Studies, University of Toronto

This presentation was inspired by a panel I was honoured to be part of at this year’s Caribbean Studies Association Annual Conference in Havana in June, which engaged academics who have secured regular column space in several Caribbean newspapers: Gabrielle Hosein (Diary of a Mothering Worker, Trinidad and Tobago Guardian); Tennyson Joseph and Cynthia Barrow-Giles (Barbados Today and Barbados Nation), Carolyn Cooper (Sunday Gleaner and former columnist, Observer, Jamaica) and myself (In the Diaspora, Stabroek News, Guyana). Among the questions raised by this work are: What sort of bridge does this represent across our academic and public intellectual lives? What kinds of speech are authorized? How might our intellectual interventions traverse or interrupt spaces of nation, region and diaspora? What might a regional imaginary and literacy/fluency look like? What might it mean to decenter the columnist?
 
This presentation reflects on a (very!) few of these questions, drawing on my experience over the past decade editing the 'In the Diaspora' column in the Stabroek News, Guyana. I hope to address the historical context for the column; outline some of the political-intellectual-ethical principles shaping our endeavour, weaving some examples of columns through my presentation to elaborate; and offer some modest thoughts about some of the challenges of public intellectual interventions that remind us that this is always unfinished work.  

Diaspora

 

 
Alissa Trotz

Alissa Trotz, Women and Gender Studies/Caribbean Studies, University of Toronto

Alissa Trotz edits a weekly column, In the Diaspora, in a Guyanese daily, Stabroek News   

 

 

The Labour of Clientelism: Work, Citizenship, and Entitlement in Africa


Title: The Labour of Clientelism:
Work, Citizenship, and Entitlement
in Africa

Date: October 11, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Ralph Callebert, History, University of Toronto

In this talk, Ralph Callebert builds on his argument in his first book, On Durban's Docks: Zulu Workers, Rural Households, Global Labor, to explore the links between labour and citizenship from an Africanist perspective. He argues that African socioeconomic realities challenge us to broaden our understanding of labour, which in turn can help us think differently about the crisis of citizenship in Africa and elsewhere.

 

 
Ralph Callebert

Ralph Callebert, History, University of Toronto Biography to come.   

Ralph Callebert has a PhD in History from Queen's University and teaches at the New College Writing Centre at the University of Toronto. He is author of On Durban’s Docks: Zulu workers, rural households, global labor (University of Rochester Press, 2017) and has published ten articles and book chapters, including in Socialism & Democracy, History Compass, Africa, International Labor and Working-Class History, Canadian Journal of African Studies, and Journal of Southern African Studies. His current research explores understandings of labor and work outside the Global North

 

Yesterday, today and tomorrow-Reflections on activist knowledge production


Title: Yesterday, today and tomorrow: Reflections on activist knowledge production

Date: October 4, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Aziz Choudry Canada Research Chair, Department of Integrated Studies

The learning and knowledge production that occurs within progressive movements for change is often overlooked by adult education and social movement scholarship. Yet many powerful insights and ideas about social change have been produced by people as they struggle for a better world. Some organizers, educators and activists engage with, and invoke earlier, albeit contested, histories of struggles to help think through strategies, analyze problems, tensions and possibilities.

This talk explores the place of historical knowledge in contemporary activism, the ways that activists and social movements strive to document their experiences, and how they critically engage with and educate from history.

 

 
Aziz Choudry

Aziz Choudry Canada Research Chair, Department of Integrated Studies Aziz Choudry is Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Social Movement Learning and Knowledge Production in McGill University’s Department of Integrated Studies in Education, and Visiting Professor at the Centre for Education Rights and Transformation, University of Johannesburg.

Involved in a range of social, political and environmental justice movements and organizations since the 1980s, he currently serves on the boards of the Immigrant Workers Centre and the Global Justice Ecology Project.

 

The adoption of Canada into the long house of many nations: The true reason why June 21 was selected National Aboriginal Day


Title: The adoption of Canada into the long house of many nations: The true reason why June 21 was selected National Aboriginal Day

Date: September 27, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Michael Doxtater, Queen’s Global Development Studies

 

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Michael Doxtater

Michael Doxtater, Queen’s Global Development Studies  Thohahoken Michael Doxtater, PhD (Cornell), Queen’s National Scholar, worked in research and development at all levels of Indigenous society. His background includes Indigenous Knowledge recovery, international development, and organizational development. Specializing in mediation, Doxtater’s career includes work in Oka, Red Hill Valley, Tutelo Heights, Eagles Nest, Brantford, and grassroots community organizing at the Six Nations of the Grand River—his home territory.  He produced scholarship, journalism, documentaries, and broadcast dramas for formal and informal audiences in Canada and the United States. Doxtater is a Mohawk from the Turtle Clan family of Satekariwate. He is an 8th generation descendent of Mohawk leader Joseph Brant.

 

Being Cuban Musicians in Canada


Title: Being Cuban Musicians in Canada

Date: September 20, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Elizabeth Rodriguez and Magdelys Savigne

Rodriguez and Savigne are Havana-trained musicians currently living and working in Toronto. They are Grammy and Juno-nominated artists who have toured North America and Europe. Embracing genres and roles that have historically been dominated by men, composers, and multi-instrumentalists
Rodriguez and Savigne bring a fresh perspective to Latin and world jazz fusion.

They will be interviewed by Freddy Monasterio (Cultural Studies PhD and DJ Efe Eme) about their experiences in Canada, Cuba, and other musical worlds.

Rodriguez and Savigne will perform with their group Okan, a 5-piece Afro Cuban jazz fusion ensemble, at the Grad Club Friday, September 21.

 

 
Elizabeth Rodriguez and Magdelys Savigne

Elizabeth Rodriguez and Magdelys Savigne  Rodriguez and Savigne are Havana-trained Cuban jazz musicians currently living and working in Toronto.  They are Grammy and Juno nominated artists who have recently toured North America and Europe. 

 

 

Contemporary Zimbabwean politics


Title: Contemporary Zimbabwean politics

Date: September 13, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Speaker: Gerald Mazirire, Dept of History, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe has been in a state of anxiety for the past year in what seemed to be the promise of a transition from a dictatorship to a democratic order. Indeed, the ‘New Dispensation’ that began as an aspiration following the deposition of Robert Mugabe in November 2017 is slowly becoming an illusion as the different perspectives of a new Zimbabwe have been viciously fought out by various forces since then. The litmus test of Zimbabweans’ commitment to such a transition, the July 30 2018 election, has predictably produced a disputed outcome. A groundswell of emotions erupted in post-election violence that have ripped the nation apart. This paper offers a historical view of the process leading to the current stalemate in Zimbabwean politics tracing the roots of the country’s political culture to the strategies and tactics employed by ZANU PF in general and Robert Mugabe in particular to maintain a stranglehold on power for almost four decades.

 

 
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Gerald Mazirire, Dept of History, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe Gerald Chikozho Mazarire is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Midlands State University.

His research focuses on Zimbabwe, pre-colonial communities, liberation movements, and environmental and oral histories.

 

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