Sustainability Office

Sustainable Queen's
Sustainable Queen's

Lighting Retrofit Projects

Queen's is continuously pursuing lighting retrofit projects for energy conservation. It is estimated that 17% of a buildings energy usage is attributed to lighting loads. Typical lighting retrofits will provide 40% - 60% of a reduction in electrical use, this makes lighting retrofit projects very feasible since they can provide such high energy savings.

Light Emitting Diodes (LED's) are proving to be the way of the future when it comes to lighting technologies. This form of lighting provides consumers with a high lumen output at the cost of minimal electricity. LED's also typically provide 50,000 hours to 70,000 hours of light before failing, providing consumers with a very efficient and sustainable form of lighting. Queen's will continue to eliminate fluorescent and high intensity discharge lighting when possible. There is an estimated 520 kW's of inefficient florescent lighting that will be phased out over time. This kW load can be reduced to 200 kW's using LED's. That makes for a 60% reduction in the Universities lighting load! Check out some of our lighting retrofit projects below to see how much of a difference LED's can make.

Coastal and Geological Engineering Laboratory Lighting Upgrade

The Geological and Coastal Engineering Lab recently underwent a facility wide lighting upgrade. This lighting upgrade replaced old and inefficient High intensity discharge lighting fixtures with high bay LED fixtures. This retrofit lowered the buildings lighting load by 14,000 kWh's annually. This equates to 33% of the buildings electricity usage and lowered the facilities electricity bill by $5,600! The sustainability team was able to eliminate unnecessary lighting loads in the facility while doubling the lumen output. While undergoing this retrofit, the facilities average illuminance increased from 20 foot-candles to 40 foot candles. 

Queen's also installed advanced occupancy and scene control systems as a part of this lighting upgrade. This control system allows the occupants to create scenes which control the amount of light that the research spaces are receiving. All lighting scenes can be customized to suit the needs of various occupants. Occupancy control also lowers the light levels to 5% when it senses vacancy.

  • Photo displaying new lighting fixtures within the coastal engineering lab
  • Photo displaying new lighting fixtures within the coastal engineering lab
  • Photo displaying new lighting fixtures within the coastal engineering lab
  • Photo displaying new lighting fixtures within the coastal engineering lab

 

Parking Garage Lighting Upgrade
During the 2019 - 2020 winter, queen's replaced all the fluorescent lighting in its parking garages with LED alternatives. This lighting upgrade will save $70,000 in electricity costs and reduce 29 tonnes of emitted GHG's annually. This large reduction is attributed to the efficiency of LED technologies and additional occupancy control that is in each of the parking garages. Whenever parking garages are vacant, the lighting load will decrease, allowing for maximised savings.

The affected parking garages were:

  • Queen's Center parking
  • Goodes Hall Parking
  • Stuart St Parking
  • Union St. Parking
  • Union St. Parking Garage lighting

    Union St. Parking Garage lighting

  • Queen's Center Parking Garage lighting

    Queen's Center Parking Garage lighting

  • Union St. Parking Garage lighting
    Union St. Parking Garage lighting
  • Goodes Hall Parking Garage lighting

    Goodes Hall Parking Garage lighting

Residence Lighting Upgrade

During the summer of 2019, Queen's University initiated a large scale lighting retrofit across residences. The three affected buildings were Waldron Tower, Adelaide Hall, and Chown Hall. Not only did this project eliminate old and obsolete lighting technologies, but nearly doubled the lighting levels within these residence buildings.

Occupancy sensors were also installed in the Waldron stairwells and hallways. These sensors will dim the lights levels when the spaces are unoccupied. Occupancy sensing is a trending technology due to its simplicity, and effective savings. Occupancy control in Waldron tower was shown to decrease lighting loads by 25% within hallways.

This lighting upgrade will to reduce the electricity usage of the university by 67,000 kWh, and lower the greenhouse gas emissions by 2.6 tonnes annually. This volume of greenhouse gases is the equivalent of burning 1,100 litres of gasoline annually! The reduction in carbon emissions will also contribute to the sustainability team’s goal of becoming carbon neutral by the year 2040.

 

  • New lighting within Waldron Tower hallways

    New lighting within Waldron Tower hallways

  • New lighting within Waldron Tower hallways

    New lighting within Waldron Tower hallways

  • New lighting within Waldron Tower hallways

    New lighting within Waldron Tower hallways