Office of the Vice-Principal (Research)

Office of the Vice-Principal (Research)
Office of the Vice-Principal (Research)

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion: Action Plan for Recruiting, Hiring and Retaining Canada Research Chairs at Queen's University

December 15, 2018

Introduction

The Canada Research Chairs Program Secretariat has highlighted the importance of its commitment “to correcting long-standing equity concerns and ensuring that all institutions meet and sustain their equity and diversity targets.” All universities with more than five Canada Research Chairs are required to develop an equity, diversity and inclusivity action plan, indicating how the institution will introduce systemic, structured and sustainable change to foster the full participation of the four designated groups (FDGs) — women, Aboriginal People, persons with disabilities and visible minorities. Building on the Queen’s Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity and Inclusion (2016-17), the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2017-18) and consultations across the university throughout 2017-2018, including CRC chairs, representatives from FDG, senior administrators and faculty with expertise in equity and inclusion, and CRC’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Requirements and Practices, Queen’s University has developed this action plan to identify potential barriers to equity and inclusion in the program at Queen’s and specific actions to address them. The Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) (OVPR) is responsible for ongoing monitoring and updating of this plan and, in concert with the Provost’s Office, Deans and departments/units, ensuring that the plan is successfully enacted.

Queen’s University is implementing intentional and purposive strategies to remove systemic barriers in the research environment, including unconscious biases, and to implement systemic change. Our goal is to build equity, diversity, inclusivity and indigeneity into processes and policy, beginning with recruitment and continuing through into retention and promotion.

Queen’s is situated on traditional Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee territory. We are grateful to be able to be live, learn and play on these lands. To acknowledge this traditional territory is to recognize its longer history, one predating the establishment of the earliest European colonies. It is also to acknowledge this territory’s significance for the Indigenous peoples who lived, and continue to live, upon it and whose practices and spiritualities were tied to the land and continue to develop in relationship to the territory and its other inhabitants today. The Kingston Indigenous community continues to reflect the area’s Anishinaabek and Haudenosaunee roots. There is also a significant Métis community and there are First people from other Nations across Turtle Island present here today.