Office of the Vice-Principal (Research)

Office of the Vice-Principal (Research)
Office of the Vice-Principal (Research)

NanoFabrication Kingston

Launched in the spring of 2015, NanoFabrication Kingston (NFK) is a $5M open-access laboratory established at Innovation Park in partnership between Queen’s University and CMC. The laboratory provides state-of-the-art equipment, services and expertise for the design and prototyping of microsystems and nanotechnologies. Currently, NFK has users conducting research & development in chemistry, chemical engineering, mechanical and materials engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and physics. CMC Microsystems is involved in the management of NFK’s day-to-day operations. Funding was provided by Canadian Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation.

The NFK facility is open to both academics and industry and enables individuals and companies to explore new frontiers in the design, creation, and testing of innovations on the nanometre scale. The facility comprises a 3000 square-foot lab, which includes ~1,500 square feet designated as a clean room. In complement to Queen’s existing tools, NFK contains $2.5M of new equipment, housing state-of-the art tools for fabricating and prototyping new nano-scale inventions with specialized equipment for picosecond laser micromachining, electron beam evaporation, plasma etching, and scanning electron microscopy, including equipment for deposition, patterning, and etching of materials with greater ease, speed, and precision. Moreover, the NFK laboratory facilitates the training of the next generation of innovators, offering special learning advantages as the equipment allows for accelerated “design-make-test” cycles. As such, a prototype can be designed in the morning, made in the afternoon, and tested the same evening. Hanna Dies, an MD/PhD student pursuing research in chemical engineering was one of the first users of the NFK facility. Her doctoral research is focused upon the creation of a portable biosensors to detect pathogenic biomolecules which may be diagnostic for various types of cancers and bacterial diseases. She was awarded the distinguished Vanier Scholarship for this research.

NFK is a node in the Embedded Systems Canada (emSYSCAN) network, a $50M national initiative involving five university-based facilities providing equipment, methodologies and expertise for designing and prototyping microsystems. The emSYSCAN network facilitates research involving more than 350 faculty across 37 Canadian institutions.

http://nanofabkingston.ca