The Renewable Energy Development and Implementation Lab

Renewable Energy Development and Implementation (REDI) Lab

Facilities

As a training and research facility for senior undergraduate, graduate students, and researchers, the REDI lab is equipped with state-of-art computing and server capability, as well as software for life cycle assessment, GIS, spatial analysis and image processing, including:

  • ESRI ArcGIS (ArcInfo)

  • PCI Geomatica

  • MatLab

  • SimaPro

  • Stella

In addition, the laboratory has developed several unique logistical packages including AROMA and Syncholar which may be used by team members to address specific case studies.

  • Solid Waste Management System Plan model developed by Carolyn DeLoyde using STELLA, 2016, Kingston, Ontario

    This slide shows an output from STELLA software depicting the flows of waste and costs associated with solid waste management in an Ontario community by sending some waste to landfill for disposal, some waste to a recycling centre and sending some waste to an incineration facility. The model incorporates inputs including various waste generation rates, recycling rates and incineration rates to help inform decision making processes associated with solid waste management.

  • Energy poster developed in the REDI lab 2018, Kingston, Ontario

    This slide shows the results of a joint workshop held by Queen’s University and Natural Resources Canada on 23 August 2017, exploring ways to grow the proportion of renewables in our total primary energy supply in order to address our emissions. Four key findings include: (i) Life cycle assessment is needed to benchmark new renewables. Environmental Impact Assessment may be used to apply LCA findings. (ii) Storage is essential to support new renewables, including day-to-day storage (e.g. batteries) and seasonal storage. (iii) Grid changes are needed as thousands of households or buildings begin to supply a portion of their own energy through solar or wind power and (iv) Social license may be informed by an integrated Environmental Impact Assessment/Life Cycle Assessment approach, and is increasingly necessary to engage with communities, Indigenous peoples, and other stakeholders to implement new technologies and grid changes.

  • Image produced in the REDI lab 2018, Kingston, Ontario

    This slide details three potential pathways for biomass conversion, including thermochemical technologies (heat), mechanical technologies, and biochemical technologies. The slide illustrates the huge number of potential pathways and products that can be achieved using biomass as a feedstock.

  • Student using a rain gauge to assess the Natural Heritage System in Halton Region, 2009

    Student using a rain gauge to assess the Natural Heritage System in Halton Region, 2009

  • Research paper produced in the REDI lab 2011, Kingston Ontario

    This slide shows the cover page of a research paper developed by Dr. Warren Mabee and student Sinead Earley entitled 'The Impact of Bioenergy and Biofuels Policies on Employment in Canada'. This paper was developed in 2011

  • Research poster produced in the REDI lab 2020, Kingston, Ontario

    This slide shows a research poster developed by Mark Ouseley and Dr. Warren Mabee entitled "Urban Waste-to-Energy Potential in Ottawa and Kingston,Ontario".  This poster was developed in 2020.