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The Magazine Of Queen's University

2017 Issue 3: Science on a small scale

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The Road to Stockholm

The Road to Stockholm

  • [Dr. Arthur B. McDonald receiving the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics]
    Dr. McDonald formally received his Nobel Prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in a ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. (Clip from live stream)
  • [Dr. Art McDonald with students]
    The Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy held a celebration for Dr. McDonald. Here, he chats with students in Stirling Hall. (Photo by Stéphane Courteau)
  • [Dr. McDonald with Gordon and Patricia Gray]
    Dr. Art McDonald, the inaugural chair of the Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics, pictured with Patricia and Gordon Gray.
  • [Physics colleagues]
    Physics colleagues (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Dr. Art McDonald with football]
    At the Homecoming football game in October, Dr. McDonald opened the game with a ceremonial kick-off. (Photo by Suzy Lamont)
  • [Dr. Art McDonald with football player]
    At the Homecoming football game in October, Dr. McDonald opened the game with a ceremonial kick-off. (Photo by Suzy Lamont)
  • [Art McDonald]
    On Thursday December 3, 2015, with the Nobel Prize ceremony just a week away, Queen’s University took time to honour Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald with a special "Big Bang Send-off" event in Grant Hall. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Art McDonald with Queen's Bands]
    Dr. McDonald takes a photo with members of the Queen’s Bands after a university-wide “Big Bang Send-off” with students, staff and faculty in Grant Hall. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [box of Timbits]
    Dr. McDonald has been known to use Timbits to explain neutrinos and other mysteries of the universe (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Nobel laureates press conference]
    December 7, 2015: Dr. Art McDonald Nobel Laureates press conference.
  • [Dr. Art McDonald celebrated with hockey great Börje Salming]
    At a Nobel reception at the Canadian Embassy in Sweden, Dr. Art McDonald celebrated with hockey great Börje Salming. (Photo by Gunnar Seijbold)
  • [At the Nobel lecture at Stockholm University]
    At the Nobel lecture at Stockholm University, Dr. McDonald discusses the history of the SNO experiment before explaining the neutrino breakthrough. (Photo by Gunnar Seijbold)
  • [Dr. Arthur B. McDonald receiving the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics]
    Dr. McDonald formally received his Nobel Prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in a ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. (© Nobel Media AB Photo Pi Frisk)
  • [Dr. Arthur B. McDonald receiving the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics]
    Dr. McDonald formally received his Nobel Prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in a ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. (Clip from Nobel live stream)
  • [Dr Art McDonald at the ceremony]
    At the Nobel banquet: Michiko and Takaaki Kajita, King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden, and Art and Janet McDonald. (© Nobel Media AB Photo Alexander Mahmoud)
  • [At the taping of the Nobel Minds program]
    December 11, 2015: Dr. Art McDonald at the taping of the Nobel Minds program. (Photo by Gunnar Seijbold)

October: It has been a whirlwind few months for Professor Emeritus Art McDonald. Following the Oct. 6 announcement of the Nobel Prize for Physics, the world’s attention focused on Dr. McDonald and his co-winner, Dr. Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo.

October & November: Over the next weeks and months, Dr. McDonald’s work was covered by media around the world, from The New York Times to The Indian Awaaz.

Dr. McDonald also showed his lighter side in a clip for television’s This Hour Has 22 Minutes, during which he patiently demonstrated the notion of a neutrino changing flavours using an iconic Canadian donut, the Timbit.

In November, Dr. McDonald and the SNO Collaboration received another major award: the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. The SNO Collaboration shared the $3-million prize with four other international experimental collaborations studying neutrino oscillations: the Superkamiokande, Kamland, T2K/K2K and Daya Bay scientific collaborations.

December: He also took the time to celebrate with the Queen’s community before he left for Sweden to accept his award. At the Queen's "Big Bang" send-off in Grant Hall, members of the Queen's community watched a congratulations video created by Studio Q, a Queen's AMS student-run creative agency. The video includes messages from colleagues from SNOLAB and Queen's, Governor General David Johnston, and Ted Hsu, former MP for Kingston & the Islands (and himself a Queen's physics grad.)

When Dr. McDonald formally received his Nobel medal from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in a ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall, back in Kingston, members of the Queen’s campus gathered in Stirling Hall to watch the ceremony.

While in Stockholm, Dr. McDonald took part in Nobel Minds 2015, a BBC roundtable discussion with his fellow Nobel laureates in science, economic sciences and literature.

January: In January, Dr. McDonald, an Officer of the Order of Canada since 2006, was promoted within the Order, to Companion.

Professor Arthur B. McDonald Co-recipient, 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics

Dr. Art McDonald on CBC's comedy show This Hour Has 22 Minutes with "Neutrinos are like Timbits"

See our full video playlist related to Dr. Art McDonald and the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics.

thumbnail: Alumni Review coverOther Feature Stories in the Queen's Alumni Review Physics Issue:

See also:

[cover graphic of Queen's Alumni Review, issue 1-2016]