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The future is bright

Queen’s student Adam Mosa earns young leader honours from Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

Queen’s University medical student Adam Mosa was recently recognized as a future health leader by the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame (CMHF). The year’s award was presented to 17 students who exemplify the qualities of the CMHF laureates - perseverance, collaboration and an entrepreneurial spirit.

Adam Mosa named a future health leader by the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

“Winning this award came as a huge surprise. While preparing my application and reading the biographies of CMHF Laureates, I was astounded by the scope of achievement and the relentless pursuit of ideas to improve healthcare,” says Mr. Mosa (Meds’18). “My application was inspired by CMHF Laureate Dr. John Dirks, whose generosity and humanism allows him to identify the best in others and motivates me to be a future leader that emulates those admirable qualities.”

For the past two years, Mr. Mosa has researched and advocated for the incorporation of patient feedback into student performance reviews which would position Queen’s as the first Canadian medical school to use this technique.

He is involved in the Queen’s medical community as the clerkship curriculum representative, past editor-in-chief of the Queen’s Medical Review, and a co-director for the Surgical Skills and Technology Elective Program.

“Adam is one of our bright young leaders studying medicine here at Queen’s,” says Richard Reznick, Dean of Health Sciences and Director of the School of Medicine. “This honour places him in elite company among medical students in Canada.”

Prior to medical school, Mr. Mosa completed a bachelor’s in biology and philosophy at Pennsylvania State University, and his master’s in physiology at the University of Toronto, where he was a junior fellow of Massey College. Upon the completion of medical school, his goal is to become a pediatric plastic surgeon.

“I am grateful every day for the privilege of being able to study something I love,” says Mr. Mosa. “I know how often circumstances of life intervene and obstruct the path to pursuing dreams. My own path to medical school was uncertain and I can never forget the feeling of facing a future that would not allow me to pursue my passion for medicine. My research and extracurricular work is borne out of gratitude and respect for the people who have mentored me in my career and the patients I will meet.”

For more information visit the CMHF website.

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