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PechaKucha to highlight research successes

[PechaKucha]
Leela Viswanathan, a professor in the School of Urban and Regional Planning, will be the first preseneter at the first Queen’s PechaKucha and will be talking about the work she’s done at the intersection of de-colonization and land planning. (Supplied photo)

The clock will be ticking for presenters at a research showcase on April 7.

Ten scholars in the social sciences, humanities and creative arts will present their research at an event hosted by the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) using the PechaKucha format. PechaKucha has each presenter deliver 20 slides for 20 seconds each, making for information-dense but fast-moving presentations.

Each researcher will be discussing the work they’ve done with grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

“We want to celebrate the diversity of research represented in the social sciences, humanities and creative arts community at Queen’s. We also wish to celebrate the successes and impact of the work and the value that SSHRC funding can have in advancing research, collaborations and partnerships, and training opportunities for our students”, says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “This is about building a community and bringing together individuals from across the university in a way that they may think differently about their own research and to explore opportunities for collaboration.”

The event will be held at the University Club and is open to all of the Queen’s community.

Among those presenting is Dr. Leela Viswanathan, a professor in the School of Urban and Regional Planning. She’ll be kicking the night off by talking about the work she’s done at the intersection of de-colonization and land planning.

“I’m asking how we can get planners to rethink their entire process and to ask the community what was in this space before,” she says.

Her research brings First Nations people into the planning process and has had interesting results when put into practice. In one of the townships she’s worked with, it led to them incorporating archaeological knowledge and indigenous land use practices into the town’s development plan.

“We all plan constantly, even if we have different words and credentials for it. This type of work is about creating a feeling of belonging in new ways, because the public learns and translates history into their everyday life.”

Later in the night, Liying Cheng (Faculty of Education) will be presenting her research examining the effects of test preparation on language proficiency and test performance. Because many high stakes decisions are informed by language test scores, understanding what affects the testing is essential.

“We’re trying to communicate with stakeholders to be careful in their use of test scores, as tests are a one-time indicator of performance,” says Dr. Cheng. “It has serious ramifications for students and professionals coming into Canada, such as students, teachers, doctors and engineers,” — groups that all have English language test requirements before being approved to study and/or work.

The event’s other presenters come from a wide array of disciplines, but everyone will be racing to share their research, 20 seconds at a time. The research showcase will be held in the George Teves Dining Room of the University Club from 4:30-6:30 pm on April 7. Those planning to attend should reserve a space by contacting research@queensu.ca by April 1.