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Library journal input sought

Queen’s University Library is asking all Queen’s researchers to review and comment on the Queen’s results of the national Journal Usage Project to provide further input about which journals are most highly valued at Queen’s.

For more information, please see the Information Resources Strategies on the Queen’s University Library website. 

April 17 edition of the Gazette now available

Queen's gazette - April 17, 2018
Read the online version of the Gazette.

The April 17 edition of the Gazette is now available and can be picked up around Queen’s campus.

This latest edition of the Gazette is filled with interesting Queen’s-focused items including:

  • An article and photo collection on the announcement of a $5-million gift from the Côté Sharp Family Foundation to help create a new centralized wellness centre
  • The announcements of two new vice-principals (Advancement, Research) and a new vice-provost and dean of the School of Graduate Studies
  • A feature article highlighting the excitement surrounding the Ask an Astronaut: Educational Downlink event
  • ​Updates on the latest research, awards and achievements of faculty, staff and students.

The next edition of the Gazette will be published May 15, 2018. However, new articles are posted daily at the Gazette Online.

Follow us on Twitter at @queensuGazette.

Anyone looking to get a story, photo or information in the Gazette can contact the paper's editor Andrew Carroll.

Call for nominations: 2018 Distinguished Service Awards

As a reminder, Queen’s faculty, staff, students, and retirees are invited to nominate candidates for a Queen’s Distinguished Service Award. Inaugurated by the University Council in 1974, this award recognizes individuals who have made the university a better place through their extraordinary contributions.

Recipients will be recognized at the University Council Annual Dinner on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.

Guidelines, the updated nomination form, and additional information are available at http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/university-council/distinguished-service-awards.

Please submit nominations to the University Council Executive Committee, care of the University Secretariat, by Friday, April 27, at 4 pm. 

Please contact the University Secretariat at ucouncil@queensu.ca or 613-533-6095 if you have questions about the Distinguished Service Award or the nomination process.  

Foghlaim Gaeilge at the Irish Language Weekend

Ever wonder where the lyrics of the Queen's Oil Thigh song come from, or what they mean? The last weekend of April features a crash course in Irish language, dancing, and music.

[Ruth Wehlau (English Language and Literature)]
Ruth Wehlau (English Language and Literature) continues two decades of Irish language teaching in Kingston, connecting the Queen’s community to Irish culture.

The Irish Language Weekend is an opportunity for the Queen’s community to dive into the Celtic language and culture that has a long history at the university. Newcomers can dabble in Irish phrases and experienced speakers can stretch out their vocabulary in an immersive environment.

The weekend includes classes (in four levels from beginner to advanced), meals, workshops on music and dancing, lectures, and a ceili (dance).

Ruth Wehlau (English Language and Literature), the lead organizer for the event, has a passion for teaching Irish and wants to spread the word on the yearly event, now in its 21st year.

“Kingston has a big hidden Irish history, and a very active Irish community,” says Dr. Wehlau. “It’s a nice feeling to connect with this language and community that isn’t gone, despite the previous years of colonization of Ireland that has endangered the language.”

The Harp of Tara society has shared Irish language and culture through annual workshops for over two decades in Kingston. Queen’s is hosting the immersion weekend this year from Dé hAoine (Friday), April 27 to Dé Domhnaigh (Sunday), April 29.

“Any time that you learn a new language, you’re learning a new way to experience the world,” says Dr. Wehlau. “The Irish language has lots of proverbs, curses, and interesting turns of phases that are less cut and dry than English.”

Irish, also known as Gaelic or Irish Gaelic, is one of four surviving Celtic languages still spoken around the world.

“The spelling is different from English, but it follows rules,” says Dr. Wehlau. “Celtic languages are famous, or notorious, for initial sound changes. This can be a challenge if you’re listening for cues and the beginning of a word doesn’t sound the same, but it’s actually natural to change certain words when speaking. For example, if I want to say that I live in Kingston, I have to change the K to a G, and say 'í gKingston'. The sound changes are embedded in the language. It really isn’t like English, but I think that’s part of the appeal.”

The weekend costs $165 for the full package or $70 for a student one day (Saturday) pass.

To learn more about the weekend or to purchase your ticket, contact Dr. Wehlau at wehlaur@queensu.ca or visit the Harp of Tara website.

Policy Studies Implementation and Transition Working Group holds first meetings

The Policy Studies Implementation and Transition Working Group has begun to meet in early April and will meet weekly over the coming months.

This working group was created following a recommendation of the Principal’s Commission on the future of Public Policy at Queen’s University, which submitted its final report, An Ambitious Vision for Public Policy at Queen’sin February.

This report outlines the need for a ‘next generation’ of university-based public policy research and education with a focus on education, inter-disciplinary collaboration, and incorporating public policy as a pan-university priority.

The working group, which includes representatives from across the university, is tasked with considering each of the recommendations in the Principal’s Commission report, consulting with stakeholders, working out the specifics of the future and function of the group, and assisting with the transition and implementation of change. 

The members of the working group hope to have a preliminary report ready before the summer. 

Learn more about the report, Principal’s Commission, and working group on the Principal’s website.

Members of the Working Group include:

Barbara Crow (Co-Chair) Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
David Walker (Co-Chair) Interim Executive Director, School of Policy Studies
Jacquie Jamieson (Secretary) Executive Assistant to the Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
Keith Banting Queen's Research Chair in Public Policy; Fellow, Royal Society of Canada (RSC)
Pascale Champagne Professor, Canada Research Chair in Bioresources Engineering, Director of Beaty Water Research Center
Peter Chin Associate Dean, Undergraduate Studies, Faculty of Education
David Detomasi Associate Professor, Distinguished Faculty Fellow of International Business, Smith School of Business
Carly Ellis Master of Public Administration Student
Lynn Freeman Associate Director, Administration and Finance, School of Policy Studies
Michael Green Head Family Medicine, Head CHSPR
Anne Johnson Assistant Professor, Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining
Warren Mabee Associate Professor of Geography; Canada Research Chair in Renewable Energy Development and Implementation; Director, Queen's Institute for Energy and Environmental Policy (QIEEP)
Grégoire Webber Canada Research Chair in Public Law and Philosophy of Law
Awet Weldemichael Associate Professor and Queen's National Scholar, Department of History
Benoit-Antoine Bacon (Ex-Officio) Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)
Kathy O'Brien (Ex-Officio) Associate Vice-Principal (International)
 

Remembering the neutrino

Nobel Prize-winning science was celebrated at a special event. 

  • [Photo of John Fisher, Daniel Woolf, George Ewan, Art McDonald, and Jan Allen]
    VIPs pose with the Nobel medal display at the Agnes. L-R: Marc Dignam, Head of the Physics Department; John Fisher, Interim VP (Research); Daniel Woolf, Principal; George Ewan, Professor Emeritus; Art McDonald, Nobel laureate; and Jan Allen, Director of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Nobel Medal Replica]
    A replica of the Nobel Prize medal won by Art McDonald is now permanently on display at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Past and present Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) employees and their family members]
    Proving that research is a team effort, past and present Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) employees and their family members gather around the plinth. (University Communications)
  • [Janet McDonald and other attendees]
    Janet McDonald (foreground), wife of Art McDonald, and other spectators flip through the plinth's pages. (University Communications)
  • [George Ewan, Art McDonald, and Daniel Woolf]
    George Ewan, Art McDonald, and Daniel Woolf pose with chocolates resembling the three 'flavours' of neutrinos. (University Communications)

On Monday, representatives from across the Queen’s community gathered to celebrate two new installations that will commemorate the Nobel Prize-winning research discoveries of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) scientific collaboration led by Dr. Art McDonald, Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics Emeritus in the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy at Queen’s.

Dr. McDonald was the co-recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for his discovery of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon which proved that neutrinos have mass. He shared the prize with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, whose research made similar detections possible.

Neutrinos, which are sometimes referred to as the ‘building blocks of the universe’, are tiny subatomic particles with almost no mass and no charge. The SNO Collaboration’s discovery increased human understanding of these particles, which ultimately helps scientists understand how stars, galaxies, and the universe itself has evolved since the Big Bang.

To celebrate the discovery, the university has unveiled a monument between Ontario Hall and Grant Hall to share the fascinating story of the neutrino breakthrough with visitors to campus. This plinth is part of the Queen’s Remembers series, an initiative that commemorates those who have made significant and noteworthy contributions to Queen's University.

“Queen’s University has been wonderfully supportive of the SNO research work and continues to support strongly the ongoing work at the SNOLAB underground laboratory,” says Dr. McDonald. “Those of us who have worked on SNO are very appreciative of this commemoration of the important contributions of many Queen’s students, post-doctoral fellows, staff, and faculty that led to this scientific success.”

Additionally, a replica of Dr. McDonald’s Nobel Prize medal will be permanently displayed at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. The display will be located in a busy hallway between the gallery and Etherington House, and will include details about the experiment.

“The research conducted by the incredible team at SNO, under the leadership of Dr. Art McDonald, has an impact that goes far beyond Queen’s University,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “The vision of those who started the collaboration, including Dr. George Ewan, Professor Emeritus of the Physics Department at Queen’s, and the late Dr. Herb Chen, and the dedication of all who have worked on it since, have helped Canada become a leader in the field of particle astrophysics. We are delighted to recognize and celebrate their achievement with these two inspirational displays.”

Previous Queen’s Remembers plinths have recognized the traditional inhabitants of the Kingston area—the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples—and the 5th Field Company, a group of soldiers primarily comprised of Queen’s students and faculty who served and gave their lives in both World Wars. To learn more about the Queen’s Remembers initiative, visit the Queen’s Encyclopedia.

Preparing for move-out

With final exams underway, the next item on many student to-do lists is cleaning, packing and preparing to move. 

Moving is a big task and good planning is important. Students should remember to contact family and friends well in advance of move-out day and start preparations early, including collecting used boxes or buying new ones (available on campus).

Early booking is also important for students requiring a moving vehicle due to increased demand throughout April.

There are number of ways students can dispose of unwanted items:

The City of Kingston also offers Giveaway Day on Saturday, April 21. People can label items “free” and put them out in front of their home. At the end of the day, uncollected items must be brought back inside and disposed of through other means. The city will NOT collect unwanted items left at the curb.

The annual Queen’s Drop and Shop is being held April 27-May 1 at MacGillivray Brown Hall, 212 Barrie St., 8 am-7 pm (noon on May 1), where students can bring unwanted items, and also purchase things they need.

More helpful information for moving out is available on the Student Community Relations and City of Kingston websites.

To maintain a quiet study environment, students living in residence are required to vacate residences within 24 hours after completing their last exam. Students in residence should be sure to check out the information on the Queen’s University Residences webpage.

Queen’s rises to the World’s Challenge Challenge

A team of Queen’s students will compete this summer at a social enterprise competition hosted at Western University.

[James Hantho, Karina Bland, and Mitch Sadler of ClimaCube]
James Hantho (Comm'18), Karina Bland (Sc'18), and Mitch Sadler (Sc'18) celebrate their win at the local World's Challenge Challenge competition. The international finals take place in June in London, ON. (Supplied Photo)

Hot off the heels of their win at the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) Winter Pitch Competition, ClimaCube will represent Queen’s at an international competition designed to tackle some of the world’s most pressing problems.

The World’s Challenge Challenge (WCC) is a competition started at Western University in 2014, and expanded to include other institutions last year. The mission of the competition is to bring together students from a wide range of institutions, cultures, and continents to create potential solutions to significant global issues. Past winners include a team from Dalhousie University who planned to 3D print prosthetics in developing countries from recycled materials, and a team from The Netherlands who created a knapsack to help Indonesian anglers keep their catches cold. There are four prizes up for grabs this year, including a grand prize of $30,000.

Queen’s recently held a local competition, supported by the DDQIC, aimed at selecting a team to represent Queen’s at the WCC. Galvin Niu (Sc’19) and Jacob Riha (Sc’18) ran the local competition, which concluded this past weekend.

ClimaCube includes James Hantho (Comm'18), Leigh-Ann McKnight (Sc'18), Karina Bland (Sc'18), and Mitch Sadler (Sc'18). The team is developing portable cold storage units to maintain the quality of items such as samples or vaccinations and extend the cold lifetime (or 'cold chain') as they are in transit.

As the winning team, ClimaCube earns the right to represent Queen’s at the WCC and their costs to attend the conference will be picked up by the DDQIC.

ClimaCube is also being sponsored to attend the MassChallenge Awards with DDQIC in October 2018, which is the grand finale to the MassChallenge accelerator program in Boston. On past trips, DDQIC has taken students to lectures at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), visited local incubators, and networked with the startup community at MassChallenge – all opportunities that ClimaCube may receive this fall.

“We are all very excited about this next step in our venture’s journey,” says Ms. Bland. “Competing at The World’s Challenge Challenge at Western University in June has further motivated our team to speed up our prototyping process, which we think can greatly contribute to our success in the competition. Additionally, as Queen’s students we are excited to compete against our rival Western University.”

Members of the Queen’s and Kingston communities served as judges for the local competition, including Dirk Rodenburg, a lecturer and educational consultant; Pavel Graymason, Executive Director of Sustainable Kingston; and Chloe Beisheim of the DDQIC.

"I have judged a few of these competitions at Queen's, and it is always a refreshing and exciting experience," says Mr. Graymason. "I believe innovation is implementation, and in that respect these students are way ahead of some seasoned professionals - they have big ideas and they make them happen. All the ideas presented were great and demonstrated significant creativity and it is an honour to support them."

When scoring the proposals, judges followed criteria set by WCC organizers which looks at the strength of the proposal’s argument, its financials and feasibility, potential partners, some recognition of the origins of the problem, and three other categories.

Four teams applied to represent Queen’s at the WCC this year, and the DDQIC hopes to attract even more competitors in the future. Two runner-up teams will receive a one-year membership to SparQ Studios, a makerspace on campus designed to help these entrepreneurs further develop their ideas.

The World’s Challenge Challenge international finals take place June 3 to 8 in London, Ont. For more information, visit www.worldschallengechallenge.com

Engaging the community in inclusivity

The 2017-18 budget allocated $1 million for diversity and inclusivity initiatives, including support for ideas from the community.

[The QBAS conference team]
The Queen's Black Academic Society (QBAS) conference team. From left to right: Dayna Richards (Artsci '19), Kianah Lecuyer (Artsci '19), Maclite Tesfaye (Artsci '19), Sydney Williams (Artsci '18), and Brandon Tyrell (Artsci '19). (Photo by Zoe Walwyn)

When the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusion (PICRDI) issued its final report last year, the university was given dozens of recommendations to respond to – creating new positions, updating policies, and funding initiatives.

To help meet some of the needs, the university set aside $1 million per year over three years dedicated specifically to diversity and inclusivity initiatives. The funding has primarily been used to pay for a number of big-picture priorities, but some was put aside to support community initiatives – mainly to bring in speakers and host events.

“A more diverse campus community enhances our academic mission, our student experience, and our research,” says Teri Shearer, Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion). “These initiatives have offered many opportunities to share diverse perspectives and ideas across the university over the past year, and I thank all of the organizers who are helping us build a more inclusive community.”

[Photo from Mus[interpreted] art collection]
Additional funding for the Journal of Critical Race Inquiry has allowed them to purchase art like this image, from the “Truth & Dare Project” by Zahra Agjee, to enhance the journal’s presentation. (Supplied Photo)

A total of six initiatives were funded, resulting in dozens of high profile speakers visiting campus and some enhancements to a key diversity publication produced at Queen’s.

The Journal of Critical Race Inquiry, a publication based in Queen’s Gender Studies department, received some additional funding to help with the journal’s long-term planning and allowed them to make some investments to enhance the journal’s presentation – for instance, the February edition featured an art piece from the (Mus)interpreted project. Providing more funding for the journal was a recommendation of the PICRDI report.

In the academic year ahead, Samantha King, Head of the Department of Gender Studies, says the journal is planning an international symposium and special issue on ‘Decolonial Sex and Love’.

The Studies in National and International Development (SNID) speaker series was another initiative which received support. In addition to featuring 12 Queen’s academics, SNID 2017-18 co-chair Karen Dubinsky says the funding they received helped them bring in 12 up-and-coming speakers.

Upcoming Events
SNID: Regulating Romance: Hindus, Muslims and Proscribed Pleasures in Modern India – Thurs, Apr 19, 5 – 6:30 pm, Mackintosh-Corry Hall Room D214

Muslim Societies, Global Perspectives: The Medieval Mediterranean: Interconnected Histories – Sat, Apr 28, 9 am – 5 pm, Watson Hall Room 217

“Some of the highlights of this year’s series were Tanya Talaga, author of Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Deaths and Hard Truths in a Northern City; and Robin Maynard, author of Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to the Present,” says Dr. Dubinsky, who is a Professor in Global Development Studies and History. “Both of these authors came to Queen’s at the beginning their book tours, and these titles have since become celebrated across Canada.”

Other groups across the institution and the Kingston community joined in with the Provost’s Office to help fund some of these programs. For example, the Faculty of Arts & Science partnered with the Provost’s Office to help fund the Muslim Societies-Global Perspectives initiative, which hosted a series of events looking at the legacy of Kingston resident and Syrian immigrant George Masoud, the 2017 Québec mosque massacre, and medieval Jerusalem.

[Adnan Husain, Ariel Salzmann, Gord Dueck]
Adnan Husain, Ariel Salzmann, and Gord Dueck of the History Department pose with a poster from their event about the life of George Masoud. (University Communications)

The support also resulted in some brand new projects, such as the Future of Black Scholarship Conference organized by the Queen’s Black Academic Society. More than 90 students, faculty, and alumni attended, and organizers say they hope to build on that with a second conference in 2019. Various community and corporate sponsors supplemented the Provost’s Office sponsorship.

Dr. Shearer says the Provost’s Office will seek to raise awareness of the opportunity to apply for funding in the year ahead. Her office is currently drafting terms of reference for the application process, which will be unveiled this fall.

Reports will be issued in the near future which detail the university’s overall progress in meeting the PICRDI recommendations since the report was issued last year. You can find links to all the mid-term updates on the Deputy Provost’s webpage.

A growing opportunity

As the school term winds down, the Queen’s Sustainability team is gearing up to provide the Queen’s community with an opportunity to try out their green thumbs over the summer.

The Queen’s Community Garden, operating since 2010, has garden plots available for reservations. Adjacent to the stone house on west campus, prospective gardeners can pay an annual rental fee of $25 for access to a three foot by seven foot raised garden plot, gardening tools, and water spigot.

The Queen’s community garden in full bloom. (Photo: Queen’s Sustainability)
The Queen’s community garden in full bloom. (Photo: Queen’s Sustainability)

“Sustainable food systems are an important part of the sustainability landscape at Queen’s,” says Llynwen Osborne, Recycling Coordinator. “The garden is a great way for students, staff, and Kingston community members to grow their own food or flowers.”

Gardeners can plan out their plots however they like with their own seeds. They are responsible for maintenance of the plots and removing plants at the end of the growing season in October.

New gardeners are encouraged to take the opportunity to learn from more experienced members throughout the growing season.

“Four years ago my wife, Sarah, and I lived in an apartment building with no gardening facilities and a small balcony, and we wanted to grow our own food, including larger plants like eggplants,” says James Lew, former Computer Science student and long-term gardener at the Community Garden. “The garden has been great for us to have something to go to, take care of, and nurture over the years.”

For new gardeners, Mr. Lew recommends planning out the plot before planting to maximize the space and starting out with smaller plants that don’t overshadow each other.

There are 18 west campus plots, including one accessible plot. Another garden area is located at An Clachan, available to residents of the building.

To reserve your garden plot or find out more about the yearly project, email sustainability@queensu.ca. Plots available for rent by May 1, 2018 for the May to October season.

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