Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Campus Community

Queen's United Way campaign reaches $182,000

"Queen's United Way Campaign"The Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.

To date, the campaign has reached $182,000, or 57 per cent of its goal.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

More information on the campaign and the role of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee is available in this Gazette article.

Seeking Canada’s next big infrastructure idea

A photo of the Saint Lawrence Seaway under construction. What will Canada's next great infrastructure project be? (Supplied Photo)
A photo of the St. Lawrence Seaway under construction. What will Canada's next great infrastructure project be? (Supplied Photo)

Organizers of the CanInfra Challenge say Canada is ‘too big to think small’. They are calling on Canadians from coast to coast to coast to share their ideas for the country’s next big infrastructure idea for a chance to win a cash prize. And the Queen’s School of Policy Studies thinks the next great Canadian project, on the scale of the Transcontinental Railway or the St. Lawrence Seaway, could come from Queen’s.

The School is organizing a lunch and learn on Friday, Oct. 20 from 12:30-2:30 pm in Robert Sutherland Hall Room 202 for graduate students interested in learning more about the competition and helping to develop a proposal on behalf of the university.  

“This is an opportunity for us to suggest a transformative project that will help shape our country, transforming its economic and social wellbeing and creating a generational impact,” says David Walker, Executive Director and Stauffer-Dunning Chair of Policy Studies. “We welcome graduate students from all backgrounds who will bring creativity and passion to this important project. I am eager to hear what our students will envision for the future of our country.”

The organizers and sponsors of the challenge include the Boston Consulting Group, Brookfield Asset Management, The Globe & Mail, Deloitte LLP, Royal Bank of Canada, CIBC, and Torys LLP. Collectively, the companies are willing to provide up to $100,000 to the group that submits the best idea to improve transportation, energy distribution, water and waste water management, social resources like hospitals and schools, or infrastructure projects that enhance internet access. In addition, the grand prize winner will receive a private pitch session with Canada’s Minister of Finance.

The competition’s application window opens in November, and closes at the end of 2017. Entries will be evaluated based on their transformational nature, their relevance, and their feasibility. Finalists will also be evaluated on the compelling nature of their presentation and ability to address questions by the judges.

Winners of the CanInfra Challenge will be announced in the spring. For more information on the competition, visit www.caninfra.ca.

For more information on the Queen’s School of Policy Studies information session, please contact chanel.manzonepilon@queensu.ca

Queen’s remembers Gord Downie

Gord Downie of The Tragically Hip
Gord Downie (Artsci'86, LLD'16) performs during The Tragically Hip's final tour. Mr Downie died Tuesday night in Toronto from brain cancer. (Andrew Chin/Getty Images)

Queen’s University is mourning the death of Gord Downie (Artsci'86, LLD'16), lead singer of The Tragically Hip, a Queen’s graduate and honorary degree recipient.

Mr. Downie died Tuesday night in Toronto from brain cancer. He was 53.

In his memory, flags on campus have been lowered.

“I’m saddened to learn of Gord Downie’s death after a long and brave fight against cancer,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Apart from his enormous musical contributions with Kingston’s own The Tragically Hip, Gord devoted much of his energies during his final years to causes close to him, particular those connected with Indigenous reconciliation.”

Mr. Downie graduated from Queen’s in 1986, majoring in film studies. During his time at the university he and fellow band members Gord Sinclair (Artsci’86), Rob Baker (BFA’86), Paul Langlois and Johnny Fay formed The Tragically Hip. 

Over the next three decades the band remained connected with the university and in May 2016 Queen’s conferred honorary degrees upon them. However, Mr. Downie was absent from the convocation ceremony. Days later he announced that he had been diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer.

That summer, the band embarked on a final tour and raised funds in support of brain cancer research. On April 4, 2017, the Canadian Cancer Society recognized The Tragically Hip with a commemorative plaque in honour of their support for cancer clinical trials at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group, which is housed at Queen’s. 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada to present annual Queen’s University Archives Lecture

Queen’s University Library invites all members of the Queen's and Kingston communities to a special lecture by Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada. Dr. Berthiaume assumed the position of Librarian and Archivist of Canada in 2014, prior to which he was the Chair and Chief Executive Officer of the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec between 2009 and 2014, following a 30‑year career in academia. Dr. Berthiaume holds a doctorate in history.

Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada
Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada

The 35th annual Queen’s University Archives Lecture, titled “Don’t know much about geography*: perspectives on local, regional and national archives," will explore the territoriality of private archives as an issue that has given rise to heated debates for decades.

On June 1, 2016, the members of the National, Provincial and Territorial Archivists Conference adopted a Statement of Guiding Principles for Identifying ‘Best-Fit’ Repositories for Private-Sector Archival Records. Based on an examination of this document, Dr. Berthiaume will explore the importance of archives in 2017 and will reflect on the context that will determine their future. He says his lecture will examine questions such as “Like Russian nesting dolls, isn’t an archive of national significance also likely to be of regional and local significance? And can we implement a coordinated approach to collecting?”

"We are delighted that this year’s lecture will be delivered by the Librarian and Archivist of Canada. Dr. Berthiaume’s perspectives on local, regional and national archives will be an engaging treat for this lecture, which celebrates the eclectic richness of archival resources at Queen’s," Paul Banfield, University Archivist, says. "It may also be fitting to note that one of Dr. Berthiaume’s predecessors, Ian Wilson, began his career at Queen’s University Archives in 1967.”

The Queen’s University Archives lecture will take place on Thursday, Oct. 26 at 2 pm in the 1923 Reading Room, Douglas Library. All are welcome, and refreshments will be served at the conclusion of the lecture. Please RSVP by Friday Oct. 20: 613 533-2378.

National Cyber Security Awareness Month: Phishing

Throughout October, Queen’s University is recognizing National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

At Queen’s, the goal is to increase awareness about cybersecurity while educating the campus community on ways to better protect your devices, networks, data, and personal information from cyber threats.

In support of the effort, the Gazette is publishing a series of informational articles focused on online threats and tips on how to maintain and improve cyber security at the university."Cyber Security Phishing"

What is phishing?

Phishing is a cybercrime in which people are contacted by email, telephone or text message by someone posing as a legitimate institution. The idea is to lure these individuals into providing sensitive data, such as personally identifiable information, banking and credit card details, and passwords. 

The information is then used to access important accounts and can result in identity theft, financial loss, and data loss. 

What should I watch out for?

Phishing scammers are becoming more creative and savvy than ever before. These scammers are intent on extracting sensitive information from you in a way that you don't suspect. You may receive an email that looks completely legitimate, complete with headers, footers, and email signatures from a reputable company. The email will ask you to take an action (such as click on a link to ‘verify your account’) and will then direct you to a bogus site to enter your credentials. Once you enter your email and password, the phisher has obtained access to your account. 

How could this work in a place like Queen’s? 

There are many ways phishers can attack in a university environment. For instance: 

  • An imposter can pose as Queen’s IT support calling or emailing to assist with an urgent upgrade 
  • The imposter references a few people and key systems familiar to you, such as Outlook or Microsoft 
  • They then ask for your NetID and password to begin the upgrade 

What is Queen's doing to protect me?

While there is no way to completely block out phishing emails (phishers are getting more and more savvy as technologies improve), Queen's has put some measures in place to protect our community:

  • March 7, 2017: Exchange Online Protection
    There were two primary reasons for moving our email protection service to an online service; the first was for reliability, to remove our reliance on our campus infrastructure for email delivery, the second was to enable us to take further steps in protecting the campus from email threats in the form of phishing emails.

  • March 20, 2017: Port Blocking at the Border
    With the increase in attacks on the Internet, the need for security and protection rises. At Queen's University, ITS has installed a number of blocks and protections into the gateway between Queen's and the Internet. 

  • June 8, 2017: Microsoft Safe Links
    When a web link (e.g. URL) in an email or Microsoft Office Online document is clicked, Safe Links performs a scan to determine if the URL is malicious. It does so by rewriting the URL (i.e. http://www.google.ca) with the Safe Link. Safe Links also scans any documents within Office 365 Online at the time of click to prevent malicious file downloads to your system.   

How can I prevent being phished? 

The short answer is: you can't. Some phishers spend considerable time researching their targets in order to make their messages seem more credible. You will receive phishing emails in your inbox, on the phone, via text message or other medium. The only way to ensure you do not fall victim to these schemes is by educating yourself. 
 
Legitimate messages – including those from Queen's University – will NEVER ask for sensitive information (password, baking information, credit card details, etc.) via email, phone, or text message. 

Queen's offers an Information Security Awareness course that helps you identify phishing scams. Taking the course ensures you have the upper hand in identifying a phish. 

Other best practices include: 

  • Don’t use the same password for each login. (I.e. don't use your banking password to access your desktop computer). 
  • Never provide passwords, banking information, or personally identifiable information from an unsolicited message (e.g. email, text, phone). 
  • Never email your account credentials to anyone
  • Stay current on security news and share your experiences with friends, colleagues, family and peers. 

What do I do if I've been phished? 

If you suspect you've fallen for a phishing email: 

  • Immediately change your passwords and security challenge questions 
  • Contact the IT Support Centre to ensure your account is not compromised 

Students hard at work supporting causes

Students gather in the Athletic and Recreation Complex for the annual Shine Day. (Supplied Photo)
Students gather in the Athletic and Recreation Complex for the annual Shine Day. (Supplied Photo)

It may be early into the new academic year but Queen’s students are already hard at work in the classroom and in the community.

”We are proud of the work that so many students are doing to improve their communities,” says Palmer Lockridge (Artsci'17), the Alma Mater Society’s Vice-President (University Affairs). “Queen’s students have a long and proud tradition of volunteerism and leading the way on fundraising and community involvement. They recognize that they are members of a broader community while at Queen’s and have a responsibility to contribute meaningfully.”

Soon after the new group of students arrived for the fall term, garishly attired engineering students fanned out into the broader Kingston area selling chocolate covered nuts in partnership with four local Rotary Clubs. This year’s “Go Nuts” fundraiser brought in $20,000 in support of a number of local charities.

The engineering students were also busy in late September with their annual “Fix’n’Clean” volunteering effort. About 360 students gave up their time to help Kingston residents in need of assistance over a weekend in September. In total, the group helped 70 members of the community with some yard work, painting, organizing, and cleaning, and they plan to do it again this winter.

"Through my position within EngSoc I have the unique opportunity of witnessing the full breadth of the events we organize to do our part in giving back,” says Jordan Pernari (Sc'19), Director of Community Outreach with the Engineering Society. “Whether it was by raising over $4,000 during our Terry Fox Run, having over 100 people join the Canadian Blood Service’s stem cell database, or doubling the number of volunteers participating in Fix’n’Clean this year from last year, our students’ kindness truly knows no bounds. I’m amazed by the overwhelmingly positive and enthusiastic response we’ve seen so far."

Also in September, the Shinerama Campaign at Queen’s got underway as part of national university-based campaigns supporting cystic fibrosis research. The campaign includes the annual Sidewalk Sale; Shine Day, which formally introduces first-years to the campaign; and a tour of the town. Funds are still being raised, with one final event scheduled for October 21. Campaign organizer Leah Slater (Artsci’18) with the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society says it has been a ‘successful year’ and they look forward to announcing the total on October 29.

One recently concluded student campaign was organized by the MBA student Charity Gala Team. Their campaign runs through the spring and summer culminates in a gala event at the end of August. This year’s campaign, in support of St. Vincent de Paul Society Kingston, raised over $20,000 – far exceeding the campaign goal of $15,000.

“It was a really positive experience and I joked that I would love to come back next year and participate again,” says Elizabeth Pratt (MBA’18), who chaired the campaign. “One of the reasons this year’s campaign was so successful is that we were able to bring the community into the campaign and drive more attendance from outside Queen’s. I hope future classes keeps building on that reputation.”

Many other clubs and groups on campus are getting organized for their charitable and community activities in the year ahead. MEDLIFE Queen’s is one group you can expect to hear from this semester, as President Rachael Allen (Artsci’18) says the club has seven fundraising events planned in the next few months. Proceeds from their campaign will support the MEDLIFE Project Fund, which is used to supply mobile clinics with medical supplies and resources for preventative medicine and medical treatment as well as development projects. The club also recruits and prepares student volunteers to head out on service trips to countries like Peru, Ecuador, Tanzania, and India.

Queen’s is also home to the only university chapter of Helping Haiti. The club works to build awareness and fundraise in support of their mother organization, with proceeds supporting first aid training, women’s self-defense and empowerment classes, a medical clinic, and the construction of community resources such as a water tower and community centre in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Haiti’s capital. Co-President Devyn Willis (Artsci’18) say, among their fundraising plans, the club will host workshops called “Tammy Talks” – discussions by the founder of Helping Haiti on her work and experience.

You will also start to see the Room to Read Queen’s Chapter kick into high gear in November as part of their annual ‘Literacy Awareness Week’. The club is affiliated with the international not-for-profit which focuses on literacy and gender equality in education in many developing countries. Co-Chairs Crista Leung (Con.Ed’18) and Kathleen Waterston (Artsci’19) say you can expect to see Room to Read’s literacy awareness campaign around campus, including posters and sales. Their biggest fundraiser takes place in January in Stauffer Library, as club members camp out as part of their “Live-in-for-Literacy” initiative.

For a full listing of clubs at Queen’s, including the many charitable clubs and their fundraising and volunteering efforts, visit myams.org/clubs-directory.  

Principal’s statement on Homecoming weekend

This past weekend Queen’s enjoyed a very successful Homecoming and ReUnion Street celebration which drew over 4,000 alumni back to Queen’s over the weekend. Unfortunately, numerous unsanctioned off-campus parties and the irresponsible behaviour that occurred alongside those gatherings, has led to a number of police charges, over a dozen arrests, and of greatest concern – taxed Kingston’s emergency and medical services, which placed other patients at risk.

The City of Kingston, the police, fire, ambulance and hospital staff have all echoed the broader disappointment and disgust of Kingston residents at the behaviour exhibited by thousands of partiers that filled our off-campus neighbourhoods over the weekend.  

I share the community’s concerns and its disappointment. While not all of those arrested at these unsanctioned parties were from Queen’s, almost a third of those arrests involved our students. There were numerous disturbing reports of intoxication and aggressive and disrespectful behaviour towards first responders and medical staff. Bad behaviour such as intentionally urinating inside an ambulance took that vehicle out of service for decontamination, and sheer numbers of alcohol-related sickness overwhelmed emergency rooms and took beds away from other serious medical incidents.

The majority of these perpetrators were apparently adults, including many Queen’s students, yet they failed to behave as we expect adults to behave. Those that were charged will certainly have to face the consequences like adults.

I take this issue seriously. This year the university provided increased education around alcohol awareness and safe drinking, we ensured more food and water was available for students, and increased awareness of student help services and walk home services. However, regulating off-campus parties remain a challenge. 

Last year, Queen’s wrote to the City asking them to examine available options to provide greater enforcement mechanisms and resources, which would help deter nuisance and unsafe behaviour, and to hold individuals and property owners accountable.  I will be meeting very soon with city officials, emergency services departments and officials from Kingston Health Science Centre to advance these efforts.

I am committed to ensuring the university works with neighbours, students, the City of Kingston and other stakeholders to continue efforts to reduce binge drinking, encourage safe and respectful behaviour, and enhance the enforcement mechanisms available to address off-campus parties.

We had a very successful Homecoming 2017 and ReUnion Street celebration, and thousands of alumni enjoyed a wonderful weekend that brought many benefits to the surrounding area. This was thanks to months of hard work and planning by hundreds of dedicated students and staff. Unfortunately the distasteful behaviour we all bore witness to during unsanctioned off-campus events, overshadowed that work in the minds of many residents due to the immediate and negative impacts it had on too many people’s lives.

– Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor

 

From trash to treasure

  • Julia Fast-Grass (Artsci'20) imagines a forest without trees. (University Communications)
    Julia Fast-Grass (Artsci'20) imagines a forest without trees. (University Communications)
  • Neve Scullino (Artsci'20) brings the smoky skies to life. (University Communications)
    Neve Scullino (Artsci'20) brings the smoky skies to life. (University Communications)
  • Sara Swedberg (Artsci'20) spells out the message of their art - that we must all do our part. (University Communications)
    Sara Swedberg (Artsci'20) spells out the message of their art - that we must all do our part. (University Communications)
  • The team works together to highlight the pollution in their painted ocean. (University Communications)
    The team works together to highlight the pollution in their painted ocean. (University Communications)

It is not an obvious place you pause to look but a dumpster on campus may catch your eye this week. The garbage disposal, belonging to waste hauling company Green for Life, has been painted by a few Queen’s students seeking to remind the community about the importance of reducing the amount of waste they produce.

“We wanted the dumpster to be pretty and something people would enjoy looking at, but that would also cause them to think critically,” says Sarah Swedberg (Artsci’20), one of the artists. “Our goal was that the scenes would look like cheery depictions of life on earth, but that upon second glance show the state of our environment. Although the sad reality can seem ominous, there is hope because a lot of people making change adds up.”

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it” is painted in large letters on one side of the dumpster. The other sides show scenes of smoke-filled air, garbage-filled water, and stumps where trees once stood. Ms. Swedberg, Neve Scullino (Artsci’20), and Julia Fast-Grass (Artsci’20) painted the dumpster this past weekend. The three students earned the right to put their artistic skills to this important cause by submitting the winning proposal to a Sustainability Week contest organized by Physical Plant Services.

With the students’ work complete, the beautified dumpster will now be placed in high profile area on campus to engage the community about the importance of environmentalism and their role in contributing to campus sustainability.

“An underlying theme of Waste Reduction Week at Queen’s is the idea that we all have a responsibility to the environment and that, by working together, we can have a more positive impact,” says Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “In keeping with that spirit, this year’s activities include students, staff, our sustainability office, and our waste hauling vendor Green for Life working together towards a goal of a more sustainable campus. I want to thank them all for making this week of reflection and education possible.”

At the same time that the Queen’s community is being challenged, through the art project, with this stark environmental reality, new tools are being unveiled to help put those sustainability ideas into practice.

“Waste diversion is a significant component of the Queen’s Policy on the Environment, and our obligations under the Waste Free Ontario Act,” says Llynwen Osborne, Recycling Coordinator with Physical Plant Services and one of the contest organizers. “We’re excited to use this week, building on what we achieved during September’s Sustainability Week, to help the Queen’s community think about how they can do their part to reduce waste both in their personal lives and here at Queen’s.”

One of the new tools available to help Queen’s employees is a website you can use to help you find supplies that other departments are getting rid of, or post your own unwanted furniture, office supplies, and equipment. Recycle@Queen’s was launched by the Sustainability Office within Physical Plant Services and developed by Stephen Hunt and Paul Hiles of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. Since its launch, 71 items have been listed across campus.

“My personal observation is that Queen’s shouldn’t have to buy another filing cabinet ever based on the number that are available internally for free,” says Mr. Hunt, the Director of Information Technology for the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. “I’m very interested in promoting the re-use of furniture and equipment on campus as it reduces overall costs for the university, reduces the carbon footprint of equipment being shuffled between offices and storage and back again, and reduces the amount of stuff going to landfill. We all want to work together, but too often the information needed isn’t available easily and widely; I hope the Recycle@Queen’s program will change that.”

To learn more about waste reduction and other sustainability initiatives, visit the Sustainability Office website.

  • This dumpster has been painted to remind the Queen's community about the importance of waste reduction and environmental protection. (University Communications)
    This dumpster has been painted to remind the Queen's community about the importance of waste reduction and environmental protection. (University Communications)
  • The front and left side of the dumpster show scenes of polluted skies and water. (University Communications)
    The front and left side of the dumpster show scenes of polluted skies and water. (University Communications)
  • The quote on the side reads, “The greatest threat to our planet is our belief that someone else will save it”. (University Communications)
    The quote on the side reads, “The greatest threat to our planet is our belief that someone else will save it”. (University Communications)
  • From the call to action, the viewer is brought full circle to the scene of a forest which has been clear cut. (University Communications)
    From the call to action, the viewer is brought full circle to the scene of a forest which has been clear cut. (University Communications)

First Queen’s Remembers plinth unveiled

  • Principal Daniel Woolf speaks at the unveiling of the first Queen's Remembers plinth. These monuments are designed to help staff and faculty, students, and other visitors to the campus form a more complete picture of the history of Queen’s. (University Communications)
    Principal Daniel Woolf speaks at the unveiling of the first Queen's Remembers plinth. These monuments are designed to help staff and faculty, students, and other visitors to the campus form a more complete picture of the history of Queen’s. (University Communications)
  • Principal Daniel Woolf and Director of Indigenous Initiatives Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) unveil a plinth honouring the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples, upon whose traditional lands Queen’s is built. (University Communications)
    Principal Daniel Woolf and Director of Indigenous Initiatives Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) unveil a plinth honouring the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples, upon whose traditional lands Queen’s is built. (University Communications)
  • Marlene Brant Castellano, Co-Chair, Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University, talks about the significance of the plinth that was unveiled on Monday, Oct. 13. (University Communications)
    Marlene Brant Castellano, Co-Chair, Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University, talks about the significance of the plinth that was unveiled on Monday, Oct. 13. (University Communications)
  • The plinth, which includes a concrete base and a six page book, is the first in a series of monuments to be unveiled across campus as part of the “Queen’s Remembers” initiative. (University Communications)
    The plinth, which includes a concrete base and a six page book, is the first in a series of monuments to be unveiled across campus as part of the “Queen’s Remembers” initiative. (University Communications)

Visitors to Queen’s University now have a new resource to educate them about the traditional inhabitants of what we know today as the Kingston area.

On Monday afternoon, Principal Daniel Woolf and senior executives; Indigenous leaders including Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) and Marlene Brant Castellano; and members of the Queen’s, Kingston, and local Indigenous communities gathered to unveil a plinth dedicated to the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples. The plinth, which includes a concrete base and a six page book, is the first in a series of monuments to be unveiled across campus as part of the “Queen’s Remembers” initiative led by Principal Woolf.

“This is a heartfelt recognition that, before these limestone buildings were here and before the first class sat, these were the traditional lands of the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee peoples,” says Principal Woolf. “For too long, our country’s misrepresentation of history and mistreatment of Indigenous Peoples has been hidden from view, only to perpetuate and contribute to their suffering. To move forward in healing, we must again acknowledge Queen’s own history as an institution that participated in a colonial tradition that caused great harm to Indigenous people.”

As part of today’s launch, a Queen’s Encyclopedia page has been launched regarding the Queen’s Remembers initiative.

Please stay tuned for news about future Queen’s Remembers plinths to be unveiled in the coming months.

Gaels put on scoring display for Homecoming

Nelkas Kwemo makes an interception as the Queen's Gaels face the York Lions in Saturday's Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium.
Nelkas Kwemo makes an interception as the Queen's Gaels face the York Lions in Saturday's Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium.

A quick roundup of Gaels teams in action over the weekend:

FOOTBALL

The Queen's Gaels (3-4) defeated the York Lions (1-6) 52-34 at Richardson Stadium in front of a Homecoming crowd of 7,542 Tricolour faithful on Saturday afternoon.

After the York Lions picked up a pair of early points of punts through the endzone, the Gaels struck with quarterback Nate Hobbs connecting with Matteo Del Broccol for a 46-yard touchdown toss. Kicker Nick Liberatore converted and then added a field goal a few minutes later.

Queen’s kept rolling with interceptions by Wesley Mann and Nelkas Kwemo, and Hobbs found Del Brocco again after the second to give the Gaels a 17-2 lead in the first quarter.

York made a field goal but then the Gaels struck again with touchdowns for receiver Jeremy Pendergast and running back Jake Puskas. As the half wound down, Hobbs found Rudy Uhl for another major and the Lions added a touchdown of their own for a score of 40-13 at the break.

With the lead the Gaels held on in the second half with Puskas scoring another touchdown and Liberatore adding his third field goal of the day.

WOMEN’S RUGBY

The No. 8 Queen’s Gaels pulled off the 20-15 road upset over the No. 7 McMaster Marauders to advance to the OUA Championship next weekend. With the victory, the Gaels have also assured a spot at the national championship hosted by the Lethbridge Pronghorns.

Queen’s was able to get the jump on the Marauders quickly as strong tackling lead to a Pippi McKay try giving Queen's an early 5-0 lead. After McMaster was able to respond with a try of their own, Queen’s rookie sensation Sophie de Goede broke through for another try.

The Gaels widened the gap as Nadia Popov finished off a long sprint giving Queen’s a 15-5 lead at the half.

The home side came out strong in the second half with a try in the 45th. But Popov broke through for her second try of the night. McMaster added another try but the Gaels hung on to advance to the final where they will face the Guelph Gryphons.

MEN'S RUGBY

The undefeated Gaels (7-0) toppled the University of Varsity Blues (1-6) during Homecoming with a 78-0 victory.

The Gaels put on a show for the Homecoming crowd and scored in the first minute through Johnathan Ezer. Tries in the first half were scored by Evan Underwood, Gilad Miller, Patrick Lynott, and Dylan Young as the Gaels took a 47-0 lead into the break.

Stephen Lockhartscored an early try and was followed by multiple tries from Davin Killy and Dylan Young. 

WOMEN’S SOCCER

The Queen's Gaels (10-3-1) were victorious 6-2 in their final home game of regular season on Homecoming weekend against the RMC Paladins (0-14-0).

The Gaels honoured their eight graduating seniors prior to the match: Kyra Steer, Rachel Radu, Micah Vermeer, Savannah Meyer-Clement, Alicia Levy, Matija Skoko, Claudia Glasspoole and Laura Callender.

Queen’s scored early an often with a pair of goals in the first half from Jenny Wolever while Savannah Meyer-Clement and Matija Skoko also found the back of the net.

RMC struck back on the restart but Alexandra Doane and Laura Callender kept the Gaels ahead.

On Friday, the Gaels routed the Paladins at RMC 8-0. Six Gaels scored with Meyer-Clement and Doane each getting a pair. Solos went to Lidia Bradau, Jamie Foot, Sarah Nixon and Christie Gray.

MEN’S SOCCER

The Queen’s Gaels men's soccer team (6-5-3) were victorious 2-0 in a hard-fought home game against the RMC Paladins (0-11-3).

Prior to the match Queen’s honoured their graduating seniors Briam Jimenez-Lopez, Andrew Kim, Rory McParland, Patrick Van Belleghem, Tonko Bacelic and Jacob Schroeter.

In the 32nd minute, Christopher Meyer sent a header to the back of the net, scoring his first of the season.

After the half the Gaels put more pressure on the Paladins defence and continued to take shots on the RMC net. A late goal by Schroeter in the 87th minute the lead to 2-0 and solidified the win for Queen's.

On Friday, the Gaels beat the Trent Excalibur (3-6-4) 3-1 in Peterborough. Schroeter scored a pair of goals and Bacelic added another before the hosts added a late goal.

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen's Gaels (2-0-0) rounded out perfect opening weekend with a 4-0 win over the UOIT Ridgebacks (1-1-0). Jacob Brennan made 25 saves for the shutout.

Darcy Greenaway had a pair of goals and Damian Bourne and Luke Edwards also scored.

On Friday, the Gaels opened their season in style with a convincing 5-2 victory over the Laurentian Voyageurs (0-1-0).

After the visitors opened the scoring the Gaels struck back through Luke Bertolucci. But the Voyageurs added another for a 2-1 lead after the first.

Queen’s bounced back with goals from Slater Doggett and Brandon Prophet in the second period. Eric Ming stretched the lead to 4-2 in the third and Doggett added an empty-netter. Kevin Bailie made 27 saves for the win.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

The Queens Gaels (1-0-0-0) started their season with a 2-1 win over the UOIT Ridgebacks (0-0-1-0) Saturday in Oshawa.

Kaylie Dennis opened the scoring for the Gaels in the first and the Ridgebacks evened the score in the second. Midway through the third Caroline DeBruin tapped home the winner.

BASEBALL

The Queen’s Gaels used a strong eight-inning performance by pitcher Jordan Herbison and a four-hit game by right-fielder Curt Smith to beat the Waterloo Warriors to claim the bronze medal at the 2017 OUA baseball championship.

Herbison, one of the top starters in the OUA during the regular season, surrendered only three runs on seven hits over eight innings. He constantly pitched ahead and attacked the zone and finished the day with nine strikeouts.

Queen’s scored three runs in the first inning on a bases loaded walk and back-to-back singles by Curt Smith and Joey Stipec. Kail Belowglowka drove in two on a towering double in the third, and Smith would drive in runs in both the fourth and sixth. 

After the Warriors scored three runs to close the gap in the fifth, Queen’s added runs in the sixth and seventh innings.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Campus Community