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Queen's researcher questions hospital cleanliness

A microscope image of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA.
Image courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

By Rosie Hales, Communications Officer

A Queen’s researcher has found that nearly 40 per cent of infection control practitioners do not believe their hospital is sufficiently clean.

The study, led by Queen’s researcher and professor Dick Zoutman, examined how the working relationship between Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) teams and Environmental Services (EVS) teams impacted antibiotic-resistant organism (AROs) rates. AROs, such as nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, can be spread from a healthcare practitioner to a patient through something as simple as lifting the patient onto a bed.

“It is a source of concern for me that 40 per cent of infection control practitioners believed their hospital wasn’t clean enough for infection control needs,” says Dr. Zoutman. “I also think that it’s important to note that a good working relationship between IPAC and EVS results in reduced infections.”

Starting in 2011, lead infection control professionals in hospitals across Canada completed an online survey that assessed the working relationship between the IPAC and Environmental Services (EVS). The survey assessed cleaning collaborations, staff training, hospital cleanliness and ARO infection rates.

It is a source of concern for me that 40 per cent of infection control practitioners believed their hospital wasn’t clean enough for infection control needs.

The study had an extremely high response rate of 58.3 per cent and the results identify deficits in the adequacy of cleaning staff training and hospital cleanliness.

“Overall, this study shows that the environment of a hospital plays a huge role in healthcare and infection control,” says Dr. Zoutman."Cleaning is a very expensive part of a hospital budget – about three to five per cent - and we had no baseline research to analyze our approach to cleanliness."

A third of the IPAC respondents did not rate EVS cleaning staff as adequately trained to clean to standards. In one-fifth of hospitals, it was noted that IPAC and EVS did not frequently collaborate on cleaning practises.

“The message we can take away from this study is that hospital administration and provincial ministries of health need to pay more attention to hospital environmental services,” says Dr. Zoutman. “I don’t think the solution is to pour more resources into it, though. We need to apply some science to the art of cleaning a hospital by improving our processes and auditing these processes to make sure we are achieving the desired results.”

This study was published in April's issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Queen's earns four new Canada Research Chairs

By Anne Craig, Communications Officer

Four Queen’s University professors have been named new Canada Research Chairs and one professor’s current chair position is being renewed. The five chairs are Canadian leaders in their respective research fields.

Developed in 2000, each year the CRC program invests up to $265 million to attract and retain some of the world's most accomplished and promising minds. Queen’s will receive $200,000 per year over seven years for each Tier 1 Chair and $100,000 per year over five years for each Tier 2 Chair.

“By attracting the most skilled and promising researchers, the CRC program facilitates cutting-edge research and advances Canada as a world leader in discovery and innovation,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research).  “Our success in garnering four new chairs and one renewal is demonstrative of  Queen’s leadership in research areas that address some of the most challenging and complex problems facing the world today – from human health and climate change to development of software intelligence.”

The university’s new chair appointments are Stephen Archer, Ahmed Hassan, Philip Jessop, Andy Take and Curtis Nickel has had his appointment renewed.

Stephen Archer (School of Medicine) has been named at Tier 1 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Chair in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Translational Medicine. His research examines pulmonary arterial hypertension and cancer and is working towards devising new treatments.

Philip Jessop (Chemistry) has been named the Tier 1 Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Chair in Green Chemistry. His research is aimed at designing more efficient and greener materials, solvents and methods for chemical manufacturing to reduce the consumption of resources, the usage of energy and the production of damaging pollutants.

Andy Take (Civil Engineering) has been named the Tier 2 NSERC Chair in Geotechnical Engineering.  His research program aims to produce the knowledge, highly qualified graduates and practical tools to better understand and manage the risk posed by climate change on the soil slopes of Canada’s natural and built environment.

Ahmed Hassan (School of Computing) has been named the Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Software Analytics. His research focuses on providing analytical approaches to support the development and operation of Ultra Large Scale Software systems like Blackberry and Facebook. Dr. Hassan, the NSERC BlackBerry Industrial Research Chair, continues his close collaboration with BlackBerry with a new $2 million investment by BlackBerry and NSERC. The two will also co-fund a long-term grant to support research projects at the Software Analysis and Intelligence Lab

Curtis Nickel (Urology) has been named the returning Tier 1 CIHR Chair in Urologic Pain and Inflammation. His research will continue to improve the categorization, diagnostics and understanding of associated psychosocial, neurologic and gastrointestinal dysfunction and develop evidence based management strategies for men and women suffering from interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

For more information on Queen’s researchers’ CRC appointments, follow this link.

Queen's showcases new nursing simulation equipment

By Anne Craig, Communications Officer

Queen’s School of Nursing is organizing a conference in Toronto to showcase the new clinical simulation equipment that 13 Ontario nursing programs have purchased following a $5.8 million investment from the Ontario government’s Productivity and Innovation Fund (PIF).

 “Blue Sky: Innovations in Patient Safety and Teaching and Learning” is running March 24 and 25 and will focus on enhancing registered nurse job readiness and patient safety outcomes thanks to the new funding.

“We want to produce job ready graduates,” says Jennifer Medves, director of Queen’s School of Nursing and Vice-Dean (Faculty of Health Sciences). “We can expose students to many new experiences, get them to critically think and utilize all of their nursing expertise, and to respond to unusual events with this new equipment. The simulation experience is an important part of their education.”

Queen’s School of Nursing faculty developed the clinical simulation education project in partnership with 12 other university schools of nursing, four colleges, and Ontario’s Simulation Network (SIM-one).  Several universities that received PIF funding will showcase their new clinical simulations at the conference. Queen’s participants will demonstrate new equipment designed to instruct students in ventilator support and respiratory distress. The equipment includes life-like mannequins for students to practice various techniques on.

This is the first time all 13 partner universities with four year degree programs are working together to develop unique education modules. These modules will be put into a large repository for use across the province.

For more information about the conference visit the website.

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