Category Archives: Inclusion

Entering our fifth year!

Learn, Unlearn, Relearn

Another school year starts and with it our new cohort of bloggers for 2019-2020! Thank you to all the collaborators that invested their time and knowledge to make this blog possible year after year.

For our 5th year, the blog will be focusing on unlearning and relearning. Our contributors will talk about the learnt attitudes, behaviours and feelings we have to change in order to foster a truly inclusive campus. We will hear about individual instances of learning, unlearning, and relearning, and about the much needed systemic change that is necessary to remove barriers of access and participation for equity-seeking groups.

As we update this blog, don’t forget that YOU are part of this conversation as well. Together We Are all part of the Queen’s and broader Kingston community, and therefore, your comments and feedback are welcome.

Justice Is Not Some of Our Work but All of Our Work

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For our April piece, Curtis Carmichael, Queen’s alumnus and a respected community leader, talks about the need to move the conversation forward, from equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) towards an anti-oppression and anti-racism framework, in order to create meaningful change

 

I was raised in a lower income community in Scarborough. In these neighborhoods, underfunded by the government, we noticed that poverty was by design – structural. Schools in Toronto, like many across Canada, treated children differently based on their race and income. They funneled Black, Indigenous, People of Colour (BIPOC) and lower income students into courses below their ability and disproportionally suspended and expelled these students.

In 2011, while studying at Queens, I noticed why students from communities like mine were underrepresented in universities but overrepresented in colleges. This was by design. Students from these communities were capable of excelling academically. The problems lay within the systemic barriers that limited their choices and access to opportunities. As a teacher and former Queen’s employee, I recognize that educational institutions often have a similar approach to diversity: to increase it without providing institutional supports to sustain it. Representation does matter; however, this alone is not enough.

Encouraging and promoting diversity does not do justice to diverse communities if systems are not put in place for them to thrive. To move forward for meaningful systemic change, Queen’s needs to move beyond Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI). EDI has become popular and trendy in western discourses but it is not able to identify and remove the systemic barriers that were historically designed to exclude and further marginalize BIPOC communities. Specifically, we must move from EDI towards an anti-oppression and anti-racism framework. This will better inform the direction of the university as it establishes the institutional supports needed for staff and students at all levels. By using these frameworks, the barriers and processes that continue to perpetuate marginalization can be identified and removed.

Queen’s University has made strides forward; however, much is still required to establish the support for staff and students from underrepresented communities. Anti-oppression & anti-racism training must be provided with institutional support and accountability in order to drive meaningful systemic change. These frameworks need to inform all of our work, not some of our work. The first step toward change is to name the ongoing oppression, colonization and marginalization for what it is. We must name and understand systemic white supremacy, a system based on economic exploitation and structural exclusion of BIPOC by limiting their access to opportunities and resources. In short, Canada has racism so deeply embedded in our systems that we need as many people at the local and national level to disrupt our system to make changes. We need to uplift one another and each find our role in this fight for justice. We must choose to disrupt our system and make changes or we will perpetuate it by keeping silent.

“The system is not broken. It was built this way.” – Desmond Cole

Together We Are reaches its fourth year!

Another successful year for the Together We Are blog! Thank you to our bloggers and readers who gave so graciously of their time, creativity and passion. Without your energy and support the blog would not be possible.

In 2018-2019 our blog will focus on (re)imagination. Contributors will (re)imagine the institution, space and dream for the future. Over the course of the next year you will hear from students, staff and faculty reflecting on the challenges and accomplishments of the past as well as their respective visions for the future.

Oh and don’t forget, YOU are part of this conversation as well. Together We Are all part of the Queen’s and broader Kingston community and therefore your comments and feedback are welcome.

Being Who You Are, Inside and Out

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This month, contributor Erin LeBlanc, Director, Strategic Program Development & Accreditation at the Smith School of Business and Queen’s alumnae, discusses themes of identity, authentic self, and belonging. Ms. Leblanc is an advocate for LGBTQ+ people with a focus on education, awareness, and building community for transgender people.

If I can’t be me, who am I supposed to be?

This is a question that I hear time and time again in conversations with transgender people. And with June just around the corner and communities preparing to host Pride celebrations, I am reminded of these conversations. Some people may be perplexed by this statement in that they don’t understand why there is such a great deal of stress for those who suffer from Gender Dysphoria.

They don’t understand why there is any issue with someone being transgender.

Good for them. They get it. They are enlightened.

However, if you don’t suffer with gender dysphoria, it is hard to appreciate what it is like.

People in the LGBTQ+, in particular the Transgender community, are, for the most part, terrified of how they will be treated if and when they come out. Because society isn’t as welcoming as some people think, or hope. There is still a great lack of understanding and compassion out there. There are numerous examples of transgender people losing their jobs, being evicted from their accommodations, and being disowned from their families. Essentially, they are disenfranchised from society.

And for what? All they want to do is live their lives. Do their jobs. Contribute to the community. But society stills feels threatened by transgender people.

Why?

Usually, it is from a lack of understanding about what it means to be transgender, to suffer from Gender Dysphoria. With some education, they start to be more accepting and can, in many instances, become allies. But many people out there in society still harbor resentment and a sense of confusion, or even disdain, for transpeople.

They refuse to be exposed to any type of information about what it means. How many times have I heard people refer to being transgender as a lifestyle choice.

A choice?

Seriously?

Ask anyone in the community. The last thing I would ever wish upon anyone is to have gender dysphoria. It is something you are born with. There is no choice. Gender is separate from the sex you are assigned at birth based upon a physical attribute. Gender is who you are in your heart and soul and mind. And that too is assigned at birth.

Who would choose to not be congruent in your inner and outer being?

To look in the mirror every single day and not recognize who is looking back at you. To suffer from the depression and anxiety attacks that accompany the dysphoria. To be out of control of your life. To simply be a passenger on the bus that is your life, with no real control over where the bus is taking you. That is frightening and at times debilitating.

A choice?

Not even close.

Think of it this way. You have a can with a label on it that reads “Peas” along with a picture etc. But inside the can, it is actually peaches. On the inside, it is peaches, but to the outside world it is peas. Nowhere near close to being congruent. We can’t change the peaches to peas. Not going to happen. That’s what they are, on the inside. Peaches.

But we can change the label.

That’s on the outside and that can be changed. So, we change the label. We have congruency. Now, people see a can of peaches and guess what. That is what it really is on the inside. All transpeople want is to have the outside match who they are on the inside. To present in the gender they were born with. For some this means surgeries. In some instances, numerous surgeries. For others, it means simply having their external presentation in the clothes they wear, and the way the cut or style their hair etc. match their gender. This provides them with a sense of congruency and hence peace with who they really are.

We are fortunate to live in a country that offers protections by federal and provincial legislation. For many employers, there are official company policies regarding the protection of transgender people from discrimination and humiliation.

And that’s great.

But the work is not done. We can’t take our foot off the gas. There is still a lot that has to be done. Policies are great. But without the processes in place to back them up and implement them, they mean nothing.

Organizations have to look at all the processes they have when hiring, promoting and training their staff to ensure there is understanding and awareness of these policies. More importantly, how it impacts their jobs so they know what to do when a transgender person is asking for assistance or simply wishing to purchase their goods and services. This means front line staff must be trained on what it means to be part of a positive space. To accept all people as equal, to treat everyone with dignity and respect regardless of their gender, race, religion, nationality etc.

Look, all the community wants is to live their lives, do their jobs and contribute to the community.

To live, love and laugh, just like everyone else.

 

That shouldn’t be that hard to accept. It’s not too much to ask.

 

Reflecting on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Today, March 21st, marks the 58th anniversary of the Sharpeville, South Africa massacre and is remembered internationally as the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. As this is a day of reflection, Dr. Sheila Cote-Meek’s piece, which focuses on memory, anniversaries, and reflection is perfect for this day.

2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the Queen’s University Equity Office. Anniversaries provide us with a good time to celebrate as well as engage in critical reflections on our mandate and progress.

Whenever I engage in critical reflection about diversity, equity and inclusion I immediately think about Indigenous peoples in Canada. I think about the gross inequities that persist that Indigenous peoples have been fighting for, for more than a century. A century, think about it!

Indigenous peoples are recognized as the original peoples of Canada and yet, on all socio-economic and health indicators we fall below national averages. In terms of education the Canadian 2011 Census reported 9.8% of Aboriginal peoples between the ages of 25 – 64 years had a university degree compared to the general Canadian population where 26.5% had a university degree . In 2016 the Canadian Census reported 10.9% of Aboriginal peoples had a university degree (an increase of1.1%) in comparison to the general Canadian population where 28.5% had a university degree (an increase of2%) . While it is great that the numbers indicate more Aboriginal peoples are succeeding in post-secondary education, the education gap persists. In fact, from 2011 to 2016 the gap increased.

I also think about the struggles of People of Color who are also racialized and face extreme inequities.

I think about the women’s movements, the recent #MeToo and #TimesUp, which all point to systemic gender inequities and the persistence of sexual harassment and abuse.

I think about people who are challenged with a disability, visible and invisible.

I think about how voices and people literally go missing.

I also think about and imagine a world where those who are marginalized, silenced and excluded are brought to the centre where their voices are heard and valued.

So while there is much to celebrate, I think it is important to reflect on the work that still needs to be done. Despite our best efforts, inequities persist. In most instances our workplaces are not reflective of diversity. When we look around the boardroom, do we see equitable gender representation? Are Indigenous peoples represented? Are People of Color represented? Ask yourself, who are the people sitting at the table?

Anniversaries provide us an opportunity to stop, reflect and envision a better future for all; one that is inclusive and equitable.

Anniversaries provide us a unique opportunity to commit to working towards societal change.

The Appeals of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

In our first blog post of 2018, we hear from Dr. Gurjit Sandhu, a Queen’s alumna and faculty member in the Department of Surgery at the University of Michigan. In this piece, Dr. Sandhu reflects upon the meanings of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

In keeping with the theme of the 2017-2018 Together We Are blog, I am in the midst of looking ahead, only to find myself looking back to my time at Queen’s University. The knowledge and understanding I developed about diversity, equity and inclusion continues to provide me with a multifaceted lens of inquiry for my current position in medical education. Although the context and content of the work may have changed, the foundational principles of equity remain the same.

While at Queen’s University, I transitioned through the roles of student, staff and faculty member; contributed to programs and policies; collaborated on training; and contemplated theory. I recognize now that in each of these roles and responsibilities, I was developing an understanding of diversity, equity and inclusion in different ways depending on how I was positioned. I would then draw on each of these approaches as needed to make a meaningful connection with Queen’s community members to advance our collective commitment to equity.

A colleague recently reminded me of a framework for thinking about separate, yet associated, appeals – those of ethos, pathos, and logos. This framework also helps me organize several approaches that resonate with me when engaging with diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Ethos is an ethical appeal. It embodies an unbiased presentation with a great deal of intentionality in choosing the right vocabulary. Mahzarin Banaji and Anthony Greenwald explore hidden and implicit biases in their book, “Blindspot.” Using the Implicit-Association Test, a method they developed about twenty years ago, they unpack individual responses to better understand how experiences manifest into hidden biases. The focus is on less reflective parts of our minds and the influence this has on decisions we make about ourselves and other social groups. When I think about hiring practices, employing ethos has a great deal of relevance.

Pathos is an emotional appeal. The audience is persuaded based by an emotional experience and how they are made to feel. The work of the world-class Center for Positive Organization at the University of Michigan disrupts the pervasive story of a fiercely competitive business world. The focus is on appreciative inquiry, collaboration, and success through diversity of partnerships. Central to the purpose of the Center is positive culture and positive relationships. When I think about community building and engagement, it is important to include pathos in the approach.

Logos is a logical appeal. The persuasive content is delivered with heavy reliance on facts and supportive statistics. In his book “The Diversity Bonus,” Scott Page makes the mathematical and economic argument for enhancing team diversity. He shows evidence through algorithms, formulas, and net results. The bottom-line: leveraging cognitive diversity results in better outcomes. These measurable outcomes, for example, include higher profit margins, increasing scientific innovation, and more in-depth inquiry in our classrooms. When I think about admissions strategies, logos is at the fore.

Looking back and looking ahead at diversity, equity, and inclusion, the lens of ethos, pathos, and logos reminds me that this work is foundational to the strength of communities, institutions, and who we are as individuals. As I think about the Equity Office and the Human Rights Office at Queen’s University, I wonder if it is possible to entirely leave a place. For me, the experiences, relationships, and milestones are indelible and palpable. They have become a part of the landscape of my life.