Featured FAQs

Question

Can I add a course if SOLUS says it's full?

Answer

You are unable to add a course on SOLUS if it is full.

Although a course is full right now students are still making changes so a space could open up. Our best advice to you is to keep trying.

Question

How can I check if I am registered in the right courses for my degree?

Answer

To check if you are registered in the correct courses for your plan, first run an Academic Advisement Report (AAR) on SOLUS.  Your AAR will list what plan requirements you have fulfilled and what is still needed. You may also check your Degree Plan in the Arts and Science Calendar for details on courses required for your plan.

If you require further assistance, you can speak to a departmental advisor in your program/plan. They can help you determine which courses are necessary, and which optional courses might be best for you. You can also speak to an academic advisor in the Student Services Office for more general assistance with course and program planning.

Question

How can I get a letter confirming that I am registered at Queen's?

Answer

You can print off a "Enrolment Verification " certificate from your SOLUS account. This indicates which program you are in, the year you are in, the length of your program, and your status (i.e. full time or part time.)

Question

How do I book an appointment with an academic advisor?

Answer

Half-hour academic advising sessions are available to Arts and Science students daily from Monday to Friday, with appointment start times from 9:30-11:30 in the morning and 1:30-3:30 in the afternoon. Students have the option of coming in person or having a telephone appointment. In order to book an appointment, call the Student Services Office (613-533-2470) at 9:00 am to schedule for later the same day. Advisors' schedules are filled on a first-come-first-served basis, so please call early. Appointments can also be booked in person at Student Services, Mackintosh-Corry Hall.

Department advisors are also available for academic advising; consult your department(s) for information on how to schedule an appointment.

First-year students in the Faculty of Arts and Science are encouraged to begin by visiting a Peer Academic Support Service (PASS) Advisor in the Faculty Office. This drop-in advising service is available 9:00-4:00 on weekdays through the Fall/Winter academic session.

Question

How do I drop a course after the deadline?

Answer

You are not able to drop a course using SOLUS after the academic drop deadline.

However, if you have been experiencing extenuating circumstances, beyond your control, that have adversely affected your performance in the course and/or your ability to drop the course within the established deadlines, you can choose to appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request to have the course dropped. This formal request will be considered by the Associate Deans (Studies), who will notify you in writing if your appeal has been granted or denied. Remember that an appeal submitted is not the same as an appeal granted: unless it is medically or otherwise prohibitive, you should continue in the course to the best of your ability until you should hear from the Associate Deans (Deans) that the appeal has been successful and the course will be dropped for you. Even if the appeal has been granted, a DR will remain on your transcript.

If you have missed the drop deadline and choose to complete the course without attempting an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies), you can seek assistance from the instructor, teaching assistants, or a tutor to do your absolute best in improving your performance. A Learning Strategist (available through the Learning Strategies office) may also be very helpful.

For more information visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences' Academic Appeals Guidelines page.

Question

How do I know what courses I need to take for my program?

Answer

First check the Degree Plans section of the Arts and Science Calendar for details on courses required for your program. In the chapter devoted to your department, details should be included for any specific courses required in each year of study of your program. Also look at your department's website for current information and relevant program advice. Students may also run an academic advisement report on SOLUS. This report will list the course requirements that have already been fulfilled for your plan and what courses are still required.

If you require further assistance, you can speak to a departmental advisor in your program. They can help you determine which courses are necessary, and which optional courses might be best for you. You can also speak to an academic advisor in the Student Services Office for more general assistance with course and program planning.

Question

How do I submit an appeal?

Answer

You can submit an Appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) if you are an Arts and Science student and have experienced extenuating circumstances which have affected your studies. You can print the Appeal Form [PDF] as a PDF document from the Arts and Science website.

Bring the completed Appeal form in to the Arts and Science Office in F200 Mac-Corry hall with a debit or credit card to pay an  administrative fee. You will also need to write a letter to the Associate Dean (Studies) explaining the extenuating circumstances as well as any relevant supporting documents. Supporting documents will be different for each situation, and may include a doctor's note, letter from a counselor or psychiatrist, or a letter from a department or instructor. As a general rule, make sure that anything you indicate in your letter as having been an extenuating circumstance that has negatively affected your studies has appropriate third-party documentation to substantiate it.

For some Appeals you may also require the permission of the Undergraduate Chair of the Department or the instructor of a course. If you are uncertain as to exactly what type of supporting documents you will require, please contact the Student Services office in F200 Mac-Corry Hall.

For more detailed information on Appeals see the Student Guidelines. Also check out the Tips on Writing an Appeal Letter.

Question

How important are failures under the new GPA system?

Answer

The new GPA grading system includes failures.  See GPA and Academic StandingAcademic Regulation 10 will evaluate academic standing using a single GPA threshold. 

Question

How is the Integrity of my transcript maintained?

Answer

Integrity of the academic record is paramount in all Queen’s transcripts.  Thus, when we switch to the new letter-based grading system, all your previous percent-based grades will remain unchanged.  All previous academic rulings will also remain.  A student will never be allowed to “switch” a letter for a percent grade, or vice versa.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a graduate school?

Answer

Generally, the people evaluating transcripts for entry into a graduate school are frontline faculty members, just like those you have encountered in your classes as an undergraduate.  They will be particularly interested in your performance in courses relevant to the discipline to which you are applying, probably far more than the overall GPA.  They will also be looking for trends in your academic performance:  a student who starts out weakly in first year but who ends up as an A student at the end of their undergraduate career may be viewed more favourably compared to a student with a more consistent, but ultimately less impressive, record.  The courses you choose will also be important:  what electives you choose to complement your discipline are critical to showing that you are intellectually mature and prepared to do graduate work.  Remember that your reference letters and any previous research experience are likely to be considered to be at least as important as your overall grades.  You should contact the appropriate admissions officer or the appropriate graduate school website if you have questions about your academic eligibility.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a potential employer?

Answer

Interestingly enough, many employers don’t place a lot of importance on the grades you got in university.  Many of them will want a transcript merely to confirm your academic credentials.  They will often be much more interested in your skillsets, interpersonal skills, teamwork and previous job experience.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a professional school (education, medical, law, etc.)

Answer

Professional schools all have different criteria for admission.  The transcript is one of them, but aptitude tests (MCAT, LSAT) and references are also important.  Some useful information on the evaluation of transcripts by professional schools in Ontario can be found at the links below:

Ontario Medical Schools (OSMAS)

Ontario Faculties of Education (TEAS)

Ontario Law Schools (OSLAS)

Ontario Rehabilitation Science Programs (ORPAS)

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a scholarship agency?

Answer

Certainly it is true that “A” students tend to get scholarships.  But it is important to remember that many external scholarship agencies use grades as just one criterion when assessing you for scholarships:  research experience, job experience, and evidence of communication, leadership and interpersonal skills are all important components, particularly for the most prestigious scholarships.  If applying for a major scholarship, you should carefully review the instructions from the scholarship agency, and if necessary contact them directly if you have questions.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated externally?

Answer

Your Queen’s transcript is an important record of your academic achievements in university, but it is by no means the only indicator of your overall abilities:  building a good resume and a network of individuals who can act as references is also very important.

Having said this, it is important to remember that those evaluating your transcript are likely to be looking at a lot more than just your GPA. They are going to be far more interested in such things as: what courses did you take?  How long did you take to complete your degree?  How consistent is the student’s performance?  How applicable are the skillsets and knowledge you have acquired as an undergraduate to the position/award to which you are applying? 

Question

How will the change from percent to letter grades be explained on the transcript?

Answer

All Queen’s transcripts contain a legend.  While the Registrar’s office and the Senate Committee for Academic Progression (SCAP) are still developing the legend for the new transcript, they have assured us that it will contain a detailed explanation of both old and new grading systems and explain to the reader why some transcripts will contain both letter and percent grades.

It is also important to note that Queen’s University is by no means alone in changing its grading scheme.  Many major Canadian universities, such as the University of Alberta, have changed their grading scheme in the recent past.

Question

If I drop down to a part time course load this year will I still be allowed to take a full time course load next year?

Answer

If you have been admitted to Queen's as a full-time student, you can choose to take a part-time course load (0-18.0 credit units) and then later return to full time studies at any time.

Reducing your course load may have other implications; if you are receiving OSAP, government funding or any type of a bursary or scholarship which may have a minimum course requirement, your funding may be adjusted or even fully rescinded. If you are receiving ANY type of funding for your studies, please check with the Student Awards office in Gordon Hall before dropping a course.

Also please be aware that some departments may be at capacity when you decide to return to full-time studies, so consult the department office for your program(s) of concentration to make sure they are aware that you are returning to full-time studies.

Question

What about the old A, B, C grades?

Answer

Arts and Science transcripts today contain a percent grade and an associated letter grade of A (80%+), B (65% - 79%) or C (50 – 64%).  It should be noted that these letter grades are not used today for any academic purpose, nor will they in the future.  They bear no relationship to the new letter-based grading system.  In fact, they represent a holdover from a time when the Faculty “classed” degrees and have not been used for many years.

Question

What form do I need to transfer a credit from another university?

Answer

To take a course at another university and have the credit transferred back to your Queen's transcript, you must fill out a Letter of Permission application form [PDF], available for download at the Arts and Science website. If the course you wish to take is offered by a Canadian (domestic) institution, this application goes to the Student Services Office. If the course is offered by an international institution, you must fill out an International Letter of Permission application form [PDF] and submit it to the International Programs Office.

Your form must be completed and submitted along with printouts of the course descriptions (from the host institution's website) and the administrative fee for the application. You must be an Arts and Science student in good academic standing to be eligible to apply for a Letter of Permission. Guidelines for both the domestic and international procedures are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

Please note that this form is only used to apply for the Letter of Permission and Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

If the course was taken BEFORE you became a Queen's student, you must speak to the Admissions office about the possibility of retroactively transferring the credit. The Faculty of Arts and Science does not assess courses taken before admission to Queen's.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

Why won't SOLUS let me add a course?

Answer

There are various reasons why you may be unable to add a course on SOLUS, so pay close attention to the error message that you receive from the system.

Check the current session's timetable to make sure that the course information you are entering in your request is correct and up-to-date.

Sometimes a course cannot be added if the necessary prerequisites or corequisites are not in place, or if you have not reached the overall year of study required. Certain courses may be reserved solely for students registered in a particular program of studies.

In general, you can add courses on SOLUS provided you have completed the previous steps to registration for the current academic session, including clearing any past debts to the university and making the minimum tuition payment into your Queen's fee account.

If you have been away from your studies for one semester or more, you must fill out a Return to Studies form from our website which will indicate your intention to return.

If you have completed all the necessary steps to registration and meet all of the other requirements to be in a course and still are unable to add it on SOLUS, please contact the Student Services Office in F200 Mackintosh-Corry Hall (613-533-2470), or the department that offers the course.