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Queen’s shares yearly reports on equity, diversity, inclusion, and indigeneity

Updates highlight ongoing Truth and Reconciliation, and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion efforts across campus.

Over the past year, the Queen’s community has continued to work together to advance equity, diversity, inclusion, reconciliation, and decolonization across campus, in an effort to ensure our university is a welcoming and safe place for everyone. Two new annual reports published this fall detail our progress, achievements, and opportunities for future growth.
 

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

EDI Annual Report CoverQueen’s made significant strides in advancing its commitment to welcoming and supporting students, staff, and faculty from a range of cultures, religious affiliations, socioeconomic backgrounds, gender identities, and sexual orientations.

“During the 2018-19 academic year, representation of equity-seeking groups within Queen’s staff and faculty has increased, and many engaging programs and events have helped to spark conversations about culture, identity, and inclusivity,” says Teri Shearer, Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion). “Queen’s is also proud to have created two new senior positions designed to help carry this momentum forward.”

The 27-page Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Annual Report reveals a number of encouraging statistics and highlights initiatives, events, announcements, training, education, and research that have strengthened Queen’s University’s capacity to empower its community members.

Some of the most notable actions include the university’s signing of the federal government’s Dimensions EDI charter, and the Faculty of Health Sciences’ formal letter of apology to those affected by a 1918 ban of Black medical students.

Read the report in its entirety.

 

Truth and Reconciliation

TRC Report CoverThe second annual Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Task Force’s implementation report notes that Queen’s made significant progress in advancing recommendations put forth by the task force’s Yakwanastahentéha | Aankenjigemi | Extending the Rafters report.

Extending the Rafters, published in March 2017, outlined 25 recommendations for sustained institutional change, including strengthening relationships with Indigenous communities, promoting a deeper understanding of Indigenous histories, knowledge systems, and experiences, and creating a campus that values and reflects Indigenous histories and perspectives.

“I am happy to see all of the positive change that is taking place across our campus in response to the TRC Task Force recommendations and the efforts being made at decolonization, reconciliation, and inclusion,” says Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation). “I continue to believe that it is imperative for students, staff, and faculty to have an understanding and appreciation for our shared history as treaty people, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, because many go on to be decision makers and leaders beyond Queen’s. I look forward to continuing this important work together with the entire campus community.”

Among the efforts outlined in this year’s update were a number of standout activities, including a ‘polishing the chain’ ceremony during a Senate meeting, reconfirming the promise of friendship between Queen’s and Indigenous peoples; the addition of four hours of paid leave for employees seeking to attend National Indigenous People’s Day events; and the creation of the Indigenous Languages and Cultures certificate and an Indigenous Language revitalization guide.

The Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts hosted the Ka’tarohkwi Festival of Indigenous Arts, and Agnes Etherington Art Centre hosted Soundings: An Exhibition in Five Parts by Dylan Robinson, Queen’s Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts. A new Queen’s Research website launched, including a story outlining the work of Indigenous scholar Lindsay Morcom, and the office of Indigenous Initiatives created the Indigenous Visitorship Fund to support Queen’s professors in bringing more Indigenous speakers and experts into classrooms.

You can read more about these efforts and updates on all of the TRCTF recommendations in the full report.

United Way campaign reaches 80 per cent of goal

Launched on Oct. 1, the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $370,178 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington.

Thanks to the continued support of staff, faculty and retiree donations the campaign currently total $297,228 or 80.3 per cent of the final goal.

Last year, more than 58,000 people benefited from United Way KFL&A-funded programs.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. 

To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway and fill out the forms. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation.

Queen’s names its next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)

Mark F. Green will assume the role in March 2020.

Mark F. Green
Mark F. Green will begin his five-year term as Provost and Vice-Principal on March 1, 2020.

Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane announced Mark F. Green (Sc’87) will serve as Queen’s University's next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). Dr. Green is a skilled and respected administrator, accomplished researcher, admired teacher, and champion of diversity and inclusivity who currently holds the position of Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment) at the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s. He will begin his five-year term as Provost on March 1, 2020, succeeding Interim Provost Tom Harris.

“At a time when the university is embarking on a new vision, Dr. Green’s widely known and acknowledged ability to engage and lead others through consensus will be invaluable,” says Principal Deane. “He is a globally recognized scholar, an experienced administrator, and an admired teacher. His unique perspective and diversity of experience will contribute greatly to our institution’s aspirations and vision for the future.”

Dr. Green has a long history at Queen’s, having completed his undergraduate work here in 1987, and returning to undertake a post-doctoral fellowship after earning his PhD at the University of Cambridge. He was granted full professorship at Queen’s in 2001, and served as Acting Associate Academic Dean (2013),  Acting Head (2000, 2014-15) and Associate Head (2009-13, 2015-18) in the Department of Civil Engineering.

Dr. Green is an international research scholar in structural engineering whose award-winning work focuses on enabling structures, such as bridges, to withstand extreme conditions, and more recently on sustainable engineering technologies. He also champions multidisciplinary approaches to academic endeavours and has been cross-appointed to both the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Faculty of Education.

“It is a great privilege to accept this opportunity here at Queen’s, a place that has served as the backdrop for much of my educational and professional life,” says Dr. Green.  “Queen’s is an exceptional institution with an incredible community of students, staff, faculty, and alumni, and I look forward to working together with them in my new role as Provost.”

Dr. Green is a member of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte and has an active interest in encouraging and supporting diversity and inclusivity throughout the university. He was the co-chair of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force, as well as an advisor to the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusion (PICRDI). He is also an advisor to the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science on the development of an Aboriginal Access to Engineering Initiative, previously served as Co-Chair of the Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University and as Chair of the First Nations Technical Institute.

Dr. Harris was appointed Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) in 2018. He will retire from the position when Dr. Green assumes the role in March 2020.

“I want to express my utmost gratitude to Provost Harris for his dedication to the interim appointment and for his many years of service to Queen’s,” says Principal Deane. “Provost Harris brought a wealth of experience to the role and has been invaluable to me in this time of transition."
 

Members of the advisory selection committee:

The search for Queen’s University’s next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) was conducted by an advisory selection committee chaired by Daniel Woolf and Patrick Deane. The committee included representation from across the administration, faculty, and student body. Membership included:

  • Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor (Chair)
  • Patrick Deane, Principal and Vice-Chancellor Designate (Chair)
  • Jeremy Ambraska, SGPS President
  • Liying Cheng, Professor, Faculty of Education
  • Cathy Crudden, Professor, Chemistry
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Janice Hill, Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation)
  • Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration)
  • Ram Murty, Professor, Mathematics
  • Auston Pierce, AMS President
  • Fahim Quadir, Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Stephanie Simpson, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion)
  • Christine Sypnowich, Professor, Philosophy
  • Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research)

Patrick Deane hosts the Kingston community for breakfast

Local organizations, businesses, government officials, and community members join conversation about shared goals.

Principal Patrick Deane hosts the 2019 Principal's Community Breakfast.
Principal Patrick Deane takes questions from guests of the 2019 Principal’s Community Breakfast, following introductions by United Way of KFL&A CEO Bhavana Varma and Jessup Food & Heritage’s Paul Fortier.

Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane hosted local organizers, businesses, politicians, and other stakeholders from across Kingston recently at the 2019 Principal’s Community Breakfast for a discussion on how Queen’s University and the community can work together to build a strong future for Kingston and the surrounding area.

Since arriving to Queen’s this summer, I’ve sought to start an ongoing conversation with the campus and Kingston communities about the future of our institution and what it should aspire to and aim to achieve,says Principal Deane. “I admire our university and our city, and am very optimistic about the future of us all. I want to hear from our stakeholders inside and outside the university and I am grateful for your ongoing contributions to this conversation. I look forward to working together to chart a new direction for our institution and our future.” 

Following Principal Deane’s opening remarks, he fielded questions and comments from guests on a wide variety of topics, including the university’s environmental sustainability efforts, opportunities to grow Kingston as a place of innovation, and the responsibility of post-secondary institutions in addressing misinformation in a “post-truth era – a subject Principal Deane broached in-depth during his installation speech.

During the discussion, Principal Deane also highlighted a number of community-focused initiatives working to strengthen the university’s local contributions, singling out the Promise Scholars and Queen’s Career Apprenticeship: Kingston programs; two of many Queen’s-led efforts designed to boost both education and employment opportunities in the city and region.

I have a long-standing interest in universities as agents of social change and enrichment,” says Principal Deane. “Institutions like ours are huge repositories of human talent, and I regard it as a primary obligation to turn that human talent to the benefit of the communities that surround them.”

He also gave a nod to the university’s collaborations with local healthcare partners and about plans for increased cooperation between Queen’s and its post-secondary peer institutions in the area, and spoke on new efforts with the City of Kingston and Kingston Police to delve deeper into concerns about unsanctioned activities relating to annual student events.

The Principal’s Breakfast is the most recent of a number of conversation events that will continue into Spring 2020, after which Principal Deane will report to the Queen’s and Kingston communities on his findings.

Learn more about upcoming Join The Conversation events and other ways you can share your perspective.

Thrive Week keynote available online

During the recently-held Thrive Week, Queen’s University welcomed special keynote speaker Françoise Mathieu, a registered psychotherapist and co-executive director of TEND, an organization that provides resources and training to address the complex needs of high stress, trauma-exposed workplaces.

An expert on compassion fatigue and secondary trauma, Mathieu has more than 20 years of experience as a mental health professional.

Her presentation “The Edge of Compassion - Staying Well while working in High Stress Environments” is now available as an online video.

An annual event, Thrive Week offers a full schedule of events focused on the importance of mental health and well-being, while also highlighting the resources available to the Queen’s community.

Leaders in sport and the classroom

Queen's Athletics and Recreation honoured the 350 student-athletes who achieved Academic All-Star status for the 2018-19 academic year on Wednesday, Nov. 20, in Grant Hall. (Supplied photo) 

Queen’s top varsity student-athletes were recognized Wednesday as Athletics and Recreation hosted the 2018-19 Academic All-Stars breakfast in Grant Hall.

A total of 350 student-athletes achieved Academic All-Star status, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year at Queen's. The event was the eighth year the department has honoured the academic and athletic excellence of its student-athletes.

“We are so fortunate to have each and every one of you at Queen’s," Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney says. “Because of your hard work and dedication to both academic and athletic pursuits, we are consistently among the top five schools in the country for the number of Academic All-Stars each year. I would like to recognize and thank our faculties and departments, coaches, academic advisors, Student Wellness Services staff, and the Athletics and Recreation staff for their leadership in creating an inspiring and supportive learning environment for our student-athletes.” 

[Nixon Award winners Gavin Crowder, Erin Lee, and Megan Saftich]
The 2018-19 Nixon Academic Leadership Award winners include, from left: Gavin Crowder, Erin Lee, and Megan Saftich. (Supplied photo)

Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris and Executive Director of Athletics and Recreation Leslie Dal Cin were also spoke to the student-athletes and congratulated them on their success.

The Nixon Academic Leadership Award was given out to the male and female athletes from both the varsity teams and clubs who have exemplified achievement in academics, community service and fair play in their sport. This year’s recipients of the Nixon Award are: Erin Lee, women’s swimming; Gavin Crowder, men’s fencing; Megan Saftich, women’s basketball; and Ejaz Causer, football. These awards are named in honour of Gord and Janet Nixon, two extraordinary benefactors to Athletics and Recreation.

For the third year the Pathways to Education academic leadership award sponsored by Freedom 55 Financial was presented to a male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athlete who have demonstrated commitment, discipline, resilience, leadership, and a positive attitude in combining academic achievement and athletic performance. This year’s recipients were Thomas Medeiros and Jazmin Millotte.

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation and its student-led Varsity Leadership Council partnered with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students. The partnership also sees Queen’s Gaels Varsity Leadership Council host a group of Pathways students at Queen’s for a day to participate in activities, have lunch, and talk about what university and life as a student-athlete are like.

Approximately 40 per cent of Queen’s student-athletes were named Academic All-Stars this year. The varsity clubs with the highest GPAs were golf and curling, while the highest GPAs from varsity teams were from men’s volleyball and women's basketball.

United Way campaign tops 75 per cent of overall goal

Launched on Oct. 1, the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $370,178 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington.

Thanks to the continued support of staff, faculty and retiree donations the campaign currently total $283,929, or 76.7 per cent of the final goal.

Last year, more than 58,000 people benefited from United Way KFL&A-funded programs.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. 

To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway and fill out the forms. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation.

Engaging in courageous conversations

In this piece for the Together We Are blog, Andrew B. Campbell, Adjunct Assistant Professor at Queens University, shares a set of recommendations to navigate the difficult conversations that lead us to positive change.

[Together We Are]After being involved in a number of conversations at workshops, conferences, and in classrooms, I wish to share eight of my personal principles. Five are postures and positions I have developed throughout my practice over the years, and the other three are from Singleton & Linton (2006).

Share Your Story
Black people, like myself, visible minorities, LGBTQ, Indigenous and the “othered” who do this work, often feel the need to be careful and cautious, often doing this work within predominant white spaces. Storytelling of others and self are powerful tools. Our lived experiences are valued. We live our stories. Often, our stories are situated and shared in deficit ways. It is therefore important and empowering to tell my own story. It is often one of the most courageous things we can do as we engage as our authentic self.

Come prepared to Learn
As I engage in courageous conversations, I am always prepared for learning. So much is happening and very fast, and it is therefore essential that we engage in these conversations from an informed place. Ignorance is poison to a courageous conversation. In the last three years, I personally have had so much learning around historical contexts, terminologies, identities and cultures. I am always excited to add something new to my toolbox. Learning is a change in behaviour brought about by an experience. How are we are changing?

Come Prepared to Unlearn
This process of unlearning is personal and calls for us to be reflective and reflexive about what we know and what has influenced our knowing. Nothing is more wasteful than people coming to conversations with deficit, oppressive or discriminating views, and after much engagement, leave with those same views. They consciously refuse to unlearn since they know that unlearning may cost them some loss of power, loss of privilege, provide truths they were not ready to face and force them to acknowledge others.

Check your Biases
The work to dismantle biases begins with you. It is an internal process. Way too often, when we seek change, we engage in an over dependency on policies, statements, and another checked-box. What we need is for us to foster a greater sense of self-examination within our work, knowing that acts of courage are centered on the individual and not a system. We change to change the system. Who you are impacts how you lead.

Stay Engaged
How many times do we hear of an incident of racism, homophobia, transphobia, xenophobia, micro-aggression, or any of the many “sisms”, and we share sentiments of shock and surprise, maybe engage in social media commentary and we move on. We move on very quickly these days and force others to move on as well. I have heard this statement many times, “are we talking about race again?” and my answer is always, yes! As a black professor, I am constantly engaged in the discussions on race. I do not get to skip it or avoid it. Each day I arrive at school, I arrive as a black man. We have to also sustain the conversation for many others inflicted and affected by institutionalized oppressive and discriminatory practices. We have to sustain the conversation for those who are marginalized and disenfranchised. We have to use the power, privilege and access that we have to sustain those conversations.

Speak Your Truth
Speaking your truth requires a willingness to take risks. Growing up in Jamaica, in a very homophobic environment, I learned how to not speak and live my truth. I knew my truth was dangerous and could easily cost me my life, family, and career. Today, as I engage in the work of equity, I am reminded of the power in truth, and I am also reminded of the possible danger in that very truth. Courageous conversations require truth – the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Experience Discomfort
Courageous conversations will be uncomfortable at times. When I teach a class or deliver a workshop, and I sense that discomfort, I allow the participants to understand the value in that discomfort. I never hasten to change the topic or move away from it. I articulate the need to sit in it for a while. I remind them if these are issues that make us uncomfortable – imagine those directly affected and inflicted.

Move to Action
In 2016 Nike engaged in a courageous conversation and designed the first sport hijab to be worn at the 2016 Summer Olympics. The Toronto Raptors made history by being the first NBA team to have their own licensed line of the traditional Muslim head covering. We have to engage in conversations that are tangible – conversations that lead to change.  We are big on conferences, workshops, seminars, councils, committees, symposiums and working groups. All that is necessary and needed, however, let us ensure our conversations are intentional and deliberate and lead to real action.

For The Record: Nov. 21, 2019

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

The next issue of For the Record will be published Thursday, Dec. 5. The deadline for submitting information is Tuesday, Dec. 3. For the Record is published bi-weekly throughout the academic year and monthly during the summer.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette Editor Andrew Carroll.

Selection committee appointed for the Director, Environmental Studies

Ryan Danby’s term as Interim Director of the School of Environmental Studies is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has appointed a selection committee to advise him on the appointment of the next Director. 

The selection committee has the following membership: 

  • Brian Cumming, Professor, School of Environmental Studies
  • Diane Orihel, Assistant Professor, School of Environmental Studies
  • Michael Smith, Professor, School of Environmental Studies
  • Graham Whitelaw, Associate Professor, School of Environmental Studies
  • Louise Winn, Professor, School of Environmental Studies
  • Patricia Collins, Cognate Faculty, Associate Professor, Geography & Planning
  • Colin Khan, School Administrator, School of Environmental Studies
  • Corinna Dally-Starna, Graduate Student, School of Environmental Studies
  • Shenali Madhanaroopan, Undergraduate Student, School of Environmental Studies
  • James Reynolds, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, comments on the present state and future prospects of the School of Environmental Studies are invited by Nov. 22, 2019. Submission of names of possible candidates for the directorship are also invited. 

Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler. All letters will be reviewed by the selection committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a director.  Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection committee appointed for Head, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Michael Greenspan’s term as head of the Electrical and Computer Engineering ends June 30, 2020.

In accordance with the terms of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University, a selection committee has been formed to assist Interim Provost and Vice Principal (Academic) Tom Harris in the selection of a head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The membership of the committee is as follows:

Elected Faculty:

  • Ahmad Afsahi
  • Steven Blostein
  • Thomas Dean
  • Keyvan Hashtrudi-Zaad
  • Karen Rudie

Appointed Members:

  • Shayna Robertson (Undergraduate student)
  • Mahdi Tunde Ranjbar (PhD candidate)
  • Debra Fraser (staff member)
  • Jon Pharoah, Professor, Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Non-Voting Member:

  • James Reynolds, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies

Chair:

  • Kevin J. Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Committee Administrator:

  • Brooke Kelly, Staffing Officer

Members of the university community are invited to comment on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and to submit names of possible candidates for the headship to Kevin J. Deluzio, Dean (Chair), c/o Brooke Kelly (brooke.kelly@queensu.ca), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science by Nov. 25, 2019. All letters will be reviewed by the selection committee and will become a part of the record of decision making.

Selection committee appointed for Head, Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining

Takis Katsabanis’ term as head of the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining ends June 30, 2020. 

In accordance with the terms of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University, a selection committee has been formed to assist Interim Provost and Vice Principal (Academic) Tom Harris in the selection of a head of the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining. The membership of the committee is as follows: 

Elected Faculty:

  • Laeeque Daneshmend
  • Ahmad Ghahreman
  • Anne Johnson
  • Chris Pickles
  • Asli Sari.

Appointed Members:

  • Andrew Borschneck (Undergraduate student)
  • Sebastian Avalos Sotomayor (PhD candidate)
  • Wanda Badger (staff member)
  • Kevin Mumford, Associate Professor, Civil Engineering

Non-Voting Member:

  • James Reynolds, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies

Chair:

  • Mark Green, Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Committee Administrator:

  • Brooke Kelly, Staffing Officer

Members of the university community are invited to comment on the present state and future prospects of the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining and to submit names of possible candidates for the headship to Mark Green, Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment) (Chair), c/o Brooke Kelly (brooke.kelly@queensu.ca), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science by Nov. 25, 2019.  All letters will be reviewed by the selection committee and will become a part of the record of decision making.

SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES

Job Title: Administrative Assistant
Department: Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
Competition: J0819-0840
Successful Candidate: Alexandra Lewyckyj Jarymowycz

Job Title: Development Coordinator, Advancement Regional Strategy (USW Local 2010)
Department: Alumni Relations & Annual Giving within the Office of Advancement
Competition: J0919-0686
Successful Candidate: Nicole Lynch

Job Title: Audit and Monitoring Group (AMG) Team Leader
Department: Canadian Cancer Trials Group
Competition: J0719-1158
Successful Candidate: Meghan Engbretson (Canadian Cancer Trials Group)

Job Title: Professional Programs Manager
Department: School of Rehabiliation Therapy
Competition: J0719-0906
Successful Candidate: Kathryn Aldrich (Human Resources)

Job Title: Education Program Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Critical Care Medicine
Competition: J0919-0456
Successful Candidate: Karen Richardson (Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

Job Title: Gift Administrator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Advancement Services within the Office of Advancement
Competition: J0619-0218
Successful Candidate: Michelle Cronin

Job Title: Program Manager (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Arts & Science, Dean's Office
Competition: J0719-1185
Successful Candidate: Chris Bergen

Job Title: Coordinator-Regional eConsult Service
Department: Faculty of Health Sciences-SEAMO Office
Competition: J0919-0525
Successful Candidate: Chelsea Good

Job Title: Prospect Research Analyst (USW Local 2010)
Department: Advancement Services
Competition: J0919-0865
Successful Candidate: Erin Bartok

Job Title: Research Assistant
Department: Department of Clinical Arrhythmia Research Unit
Competition: J0819-0510
Successful Candidate: Deirdre Hindmarch

Job Title: Research Contracts Associate/Legal Advisor
Department: Office of Partnerships and Innovation
Competition: J0419-0229
Successful Candidate: Priscilla Ferrazzi

Job Title: Admissions/Clinical Skills Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Undergraduate Medical Education
Competition: J0919-0013
Successful Candidate: Kristin Baker

Job Title: Academic Advisor and Assistant to the Undergraduate Chair (USW Local 2010)
Department: Psychology
Competition: J0919-0884
Successful Candidate: Anja Wilke (Psychology)

Job Title: Manager of Predictive Analytics
Department: Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
Competition: J0819-0326
Successful Candidate: Alicia Peltsch

Job Title: Human Resources Administrator
Department: Faculty of Health Sciences
Competition: J0819-0684
Successful Candidate: Kristy Vandervelde

Job Title: Project Manager
Department: Department of Information Technology
Competition: J0819-0742
Successful Candidate: Ian Mathers

Job Title: Director, Human Resources
Department: Faculty of Arts and Science
Competition: J0819-0401
Successful Candidate: David Mignault

Job Title: Director, Human Resources
Department: Human Resources
Competition: J0819-0475
Successful Candidate: Melissa Morrison

Job Title: Training Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty Health Sciences- Med Tech Unit
Competition: J1019-0082
Successful Candidate: Corinne Boschma (Undergraduate Medical Education)

Job Title: Global Oncology Program Manager
Department: Oncology
Competition: J0619-0360
Successful Candidate: Matthew Jalink

Job Title: Program Assistant
Department: Agnes Etherington Art Centre
Competition: J0719-0841
Successful Candidate: Charlotte Gagnier

Job Title: Caretaker (CUPE 229)
Department: Residences
Competition: J0719-1027
Successful Candidate: Joshua Badour

Job Title: Accessibility Services Advisor (USW Local 2010)
Department: Student Accessibility Services
Competition: J0619-1109
Successful Candidate: Michelle Vieira

Job Title: Student Awards Officer (USW Local 2010)
Department: Office of University Registrar (Student Awards)
Competition: J0819-0097
Successful Candidate: Chandra Erickson (Continuing & Distance Studies)

 

New clinic director to cultivate business law partnerships

Tomi Adebiyi
New Queen's Business Law Clinic director Tomi Adebiyi looks forward to enhancing experiential learning opportunities for students and to building relationships with more community organizations that will help budding entrepreneurs and innovators in the Kingston area. (Photo by Greg Black)

After only 10 months of supervising students who serve start-ups and entrepreneurs, Tomi Adebiyi has taken the helm at the Queen's Business Law Clinic. Born in Lagos, Nigeria, Adebiyi practised with one of her home country’s leading business law firms for three years before completing an LLM in corporate/commercial law at McGill University. After her 2015 graduation, she worked in different capacities with Pro Bono Law Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission and then joined the Queen's Business Law Clinic in January. 

Promoted from staff lawyer to director of the Queen's Business Law Clinic, Tomi Adebiyi speaks about her interests in business law, clinic experience and her plans for the future.

What interests you most about business law and in providing legal services to small businesses, non-profit organizations and other Queen's Business Law Clinic clients?

I have always been intrigued by business law. I was curious to understand the intersection of law and business as a law student and this influenced my decision to pursue a business law practice. I also have a strong background in pro bono service, having worked as a staff member, articling student and volunteer lawyer at a pro bono organisation in Saskatchewan. Being able to assist clients who would otherwise be unable to afford legal services has been quite a fulfilling experience for me. For many of our clients, the Queen's Business Law Clinic provides them with an invaluable opportunity to obtain excellent legal advice thereby avoiding potential mistakes that could cost their business a lot going forward. 

What did you like best about being a staff lawyer with the Queen's Business Law Clinic?

The best part of my job as a staff lawyer was supervising the student caseworkers. When I resumed in January, the student caseworkers were halfway through their time at the clinic and, at that stage, were producing substantial work for review. I thoroughly enjoyed reviewing their work and advising the student caseworkers on their client files. 

This summer, I worked closely with the three Queen's Business Law Clinic summer caseworkers to provide our clients with top-quality and timely legal services. We had a great time working with clients from the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI) Program run by the Dunin-Despande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC). We helped clients incorporate businesses, prepared Shareholders Agreements and advised them on their intellectual property rights. It was satisfying to watch some of our clients as they presented their ideas, and won seed funding, at the Dunin-Deshpande Summer Pitch Competition.

What surprised you about working with the Queen's Business Law Clinic?

The enthusiasm and dedication of the student caseworkers, as well as the versatility of files at the clinic, was a pleasant surprise. Working with startup companies and budding entrepreneurs presents a unique opportunity for students to experience hands on some of the issues that they are unlikely to find in bigger companies. It was a pleasure to watch students wear the adviser hat as they transferred the theoretical knowledge learnt at the law school into practical advice for the benefit of their clients. 

What do you like best about your new role as Queen's Business Law Clinic director?

In addition to supervising the 24 student caseworkers at the clinic, I instruct the Queen’s Business Law Clinic course. Over the summer, I worked with Morgan Jarvis (Law’10), the previous Clinic Director, to develop an intellectually stimulating syllabus for the 2019-20 school year. As part of my supervisory role, I meet with each student caseworker monthly to discuss file work and give feedback to the student on their file work. I am also working in collaboration with our partners, the Office of Partnerships & Innovation and the DDQIC on various projects, including the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES) Ecosystem Fund, which is a $3.2 million fund provided by FedDev Ontario for Queen’s University. 

What are your plans for the clinic?

The Queen's Business Law Clinic is known for the provision of exceptional legal services to the Kingston area’s growing innovation ecosystem, start-ups, social enterprises, not-for-profits and charitable corporations. I look forward to continue to build up and enhance this reputation. I also look forward to enhancing the student experience at the QBLC by providing them with hands-on experiential learning opportunities throughout their year at the QBLC. We currently have a strong partnership with the DDQIC and the Office of Partnerships & Innovation and I look forward to renewing, strengthening and cultivating partnerships with other community organizations with similar goals and objectives, particularly groups focused on newcomers in Canada, budding entrepreneurs and innovators in the Kingston area. 

This article was first published by the Queen's Faculty of Law.

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