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Robert Sutherland Hall first floor construction project begins

The first floor of Robert Sutherland Hall will be restricted to authorized contractors only between Oct. 7 and Nov. 1 (inclusive) while construction is underway in a number of rooms. During renovations, there will be temporary restriction on general access as safe access to rooms, hallways and alternate exits may be impeded.

Timetabled classes are being moved from rooms 137 and 145 to allow the contractor to carry out necessary work and to minimize the impact of the noise and dust.

The Master of Industrial Relations (MIR) Office will provide updated class locations directly to all students and faculty affected by the temporary closure of the first floor.

Questions concerning construction activities should be directed to Fixit at fixit@queensu.ca.  Health and safety queries related to this activity should be directed to the Department of Environmental Health & Safety at safety@queensu.ca.

Working together on climate action

The university brought together experts and community leaders for a forum on climate change.

  • Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane delivers welcoming remarks at the Queen's UC3 Forum.
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane delivers welcoming remarks at the Queen's UC3 Forum.
  • Mayor Bryan Paterson addresses the audience at the Queen's UC3 Forum.
    Mayor Bryan Paterson addresses the audience at the Queen's UC3 Forum.
  • Dr. John Robinson discusses the ways in which universities can be agents of change for climate action.
    Dr. John Robinson discusses the ways in which universities can be agents of change for climate action.
  • MPP Ian Arthur introduces a panel on research and innovation.
    Kingston and the Islands MPP Ian Arthur introduces a panel on research and innovation.
  • City Councillor Bridget Doherty moderates a panel on community partnerships for sustainability.
    City Councillor Bridget Doherty moderates a discussion on community partnerships for sustainability.

Ideas about sustainability and climate change permeated Mitchell Hall on Thursday, Oct. 3 as Queen's University hosted the Queen’s UC3 Forum. The event brought together experts and community members for a daylong discussion of climate change and the university’s role in protecting the environment. The forum is part of Queen’s membership in the University Climate Change Coalition (UC3).

The day kicked off with welcoming remarks from Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane, Mayor of Kingston Bryan Paterson, and Mark Green, Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment) in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, who spoke in his capacity as a member of the Mohawk community. This series of opening remarks set the tone for the event, as the forum would go on to bring together a variety of perspectives from both Queen’s and the broader community.

“Climate change is one of the greatest challenges our society will face and requires us to work with our community and academic partners to find creative solutions,” says Principal Deane. “Events like the UC3 Forum are integral to helping us foster connections and provide opportunities to share knowledge and resources, inspiring us to build a better future together.”

Through a series of presentations and panels, speakers at the forum drew on their personal experiences and professional expertise to discuss many different aspects of climate action. For instance, Mike Gerbis, CEO of The Delphi Group and GLOBE Series, spoke about his career journey and the ways in which he has applied his education to the fight against climate change. And John Robinson, Professor in the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and in the School of Environment at the University of Toronto, addressed the ways in which universities can be agents of change during the climate crisis. 

During the afternoon, leaders from across the Kingston area came together for a panel on community partnerships for sustainability. Moderated by City Councillor Bridget Doherty, the panel featured Paul MacLatchy, Environmental Director, Real Estate and Environmental Initiatives for the City of Kingston; Kristin Mullin, Executive Director, Sustainable Kingston; Warren Mabee, Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s; Nathan Manion, Principal Investigator at the Sustainable Energy Applied Research Centre (SEARC) at St. Lawrence College; and R. Donald Maracle, Chief for the Mohawks of Bay of Quinte. The discussion of the panelists highlighted the fact that collaboration is essential for meaningful climate action in the Kingston area.

Throughout the day, speakers engaged with audience participants in lively discussions about sustainability during Q&A sessions. Even though the forum is over, there are still opportunities for members of the campus community to have their thoughts on climate change and sustainability heard. If you have an idea on how to make Queen’s more environmentally friendly, you can submit your idea to the Office of the Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) through the Your Sustainable Idea page.

Bursary honours Roxy Denniston-Stewart

Roxy Denniston-Stewart
During her 19 years with Queen’s, Roxy Denniston-Stewart served as the associate dean, student services and community relations, and as the student and enrolment services manager at the BISC. (University Communications)

A new bursary is being established to commemorate a beloved colleague, community member and friend. Friends and family of Roxy Denniston-Stewart are invited to make donations to help fund a new bursary that will provide financial support to students who wish to study at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC), Herstmonceux Castle, Sussex, England.

Roxy Denniston-Stewart was known for her leadership, generosity, and continued commitment to the personal and academic success of Queen’s students. In her 19 years with Queen’s, she served as the Associate Dean, Student Services and Community Relations, and as the Student and Enrolment Services Manager at the BISC. Her work at the BISC furthered her belief in the transformational effect of a global experience for students.

Denniston-Stewart passed away in August 2019, leaving behind a legacy of unparalleled student guidance, compassion, and support.

“Thousands of students have benefitted from Roxy’s commitment to their success and well-being,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs. “That is why we are establishing the Roxy Denniston-Stewart Memorial Bursary, to commemorate Roxy’s invaluable role within the Queen’s community.”

The Roxy Denniston-Stewart Memorial Bursary will be awarded to students attending the BISC on the basis of demonstrated financial need.

Friends and colleagues can donate to the Roxy Denniston-Stewart Memorial Fund by visiting the Give to Queen’s website.

Future Prospects of the Agnes and Advisory Committee membership announced

Jan Allen, Director of Queen’s Agnes Etherington Art Centre will retire from her position as of Jan. 1, 2020. Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion) Teri Shearer will co-chair an advisory committee that has been established to advise Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris on the future direction of the Agnes, and on the selection of the next director.

Future Prospects of the Agnes and Advisory Committee Membership

Members of the university community are invited to submit letters with commentary on the present state and future prospects of the Agnes. Respondents are asked to indicate whether they wish to have their letters shown, in confidence, to the members of the advisory committee:

  • Teri Shearer (Co-Chair) - Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion)
  • Glen Bloom (Co-Chair) - Chair, Agnes Etherington Art Centre Advisory Board
  • Nadia Jagar (Secretary) - Manager, Special Projects and Business Officer, Office of the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)
  • Rebecca Luce-Kapler - Dean, Faculty of Education
  • Dylan Robinson - Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts
  • Kristin Moriah - Assistant Professor, Department of English, Language and Literature
  • Alicia Boutilier - Chief Curator and Curator of Canadian Historical Art
  • Norman Vorano - Art History and Art Conservation Department Head
  • Leigh Kalin - Interim Associate Vice-Principal, Alumni Relations and Annual Giving
  • Jean Pfleiderer - Associate Director, Human Rights Advisory Services
  • Jennifer Nicoll - Collections Manager and Exhibition Coordinator
  • Susan Lord - Professor, Department of Film and Media

The provost extends his thanks to the members of the committee for their willingness to serve. Please send all submissions to the Office of the Provost, via e-mail, to provost@queensu.ca, by Friday, Oct. 18.

Queen’s places fifth in latest Maclean’s university rankings

According to the 2020 university rankings by Maclean's, Queen’s remains among the top universities in the medical-doctoral category and is third overall in student satisfaction.

Queen’s placed fifth out of the 15 medical-doctoral universities in Canada according to the 2020 Maclean’s university rankings, which were released on Thursday.

First overall in the medical-doctoral rankings went to McGill University, followed by University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, and McMaster University. The ranking features universities with a broad range of PhD programs and research, as well as medical schools. The two other university rankings are comprehensive, and primarily undergraduate.

The rankings covered five categories: students; faculty; resources; student support; and reputation. Within those categories Queen’s highest rankings were faculty awards (2), student satisfaction (3), student awards (5), library expenses (5), scholarships and bursaries (5), as well as the reputational survey (6).

QUICK STATS
Queen’s University once again led the way nationally in the proportion of undergraduate students who graduate (89.5 per cent), second in student retention from first year to second year (94.5 per cent), and sixth for average entering grade (89.8 per cent).

“I know that our faculty and staff take great pride in the work of this institution and what we have accomplished,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane. “We are undertaking innovative research and providing our students with an educational experience that continues to be recognized as one of the best in the country.”

Student Satisfaction Survey

As part of the rankings, Maclean’s looks at student satisfaction, with Queen’s placing third, behind Sherbrooke and Laval. Queen’s grabbed a spot in the top three in six of the 10 categories, led by a first place in extracurricular activities. The university placed fourth in steps to prevent sexual assault, second in residence living and third in experiential learning, promoting indigenous visibility, administrative staff, and academic advising staff.

National Reputational Ranking

Queen’s placed seventh out of 49 universities in the national reputational ranking, for a second year in a row. For the reputational ranking Maclean’s surveyed university faculty and senior administrators, high school guidance counsellors and a variety of businesspeople asking for their views on quality and innovation at universities. In the three categories of the ranking, Queen’s placed seventh for highest quality, eighth for most innovative, and ninth for leaders of tomorrow.

Program rankings

Maclean’s also took a look at selected programs in the sciences and social sciences, assessing research and reputation. Queen’s was ranked in each of the 10 program categories: Biology (10); Business (8); Computer Science (11); Education (8); Engineering (11); Environmental Science (10); Mathematics (13); Medicine (11); Nursing (10); Psychology (6).

2019 Queen's United Way Campaign kicks off

Launched on Oct. 1, the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of  $370,178 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington.

Thanks to the continued support of staff, faculty and retiree donations the campaign is starting at 40 per cent of the final goal

Last year, more than 58,000 people benefited from United Way KFL&A-funded programs.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. 

To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway and fill out the forms. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

New provider selected for employee benefits plan

Queen's employees will soon have a new benefits provider as well as an enhanced benefits plan.

Following a competitive Request for Proposals (RFP) process through the spring and summer 2019, Manulife has been selected as the new employee and retiree benefits provider for Queen's University. 

In late 2016, the university asked all benefit-eligible employees for feedback on their employee benefits as part of the plan review process. This included potential areas for improvement. Throughout 2018, the university worked with the Multi-Employee Group Employee Benefits Committee (MEGEBC) to explore possible changes to the design of the current benefit plan. The MEGEBC was comprised of participants from university employee groups. Some of the resulting plan changes include introducing a pay-direct drug card, introducing coverage for services of a registered psychologist, and an increase to vision coverage.

“We are pleased that we will be able to implement plan design changes that will modernize the benefits plan in accordance with the feedback we received from employees, and as agreed with employee groups,” says Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “I’d like to thank all those who participated in the discussions leading to the plan changes and the competitive RFP process that has resulted in a new benefits provider with enhanced benefits and some reduced costs for our employees -- a positive outcome for an important component of overall employee compensation and support.” 

As a result of the RFP process, plan members can also expect a significant reduction in employee paid long-term disability premiums that will take effect at the timing of the transition to the new provider. 

Over the coming months, the university will be working with implementation specialists at Manulife to develop a detailed implementation plan. 

“The implementation of the new plan and transition to Manulife is anticipated to occur in the Spring of 2020," says Steve Millan, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources).  “We look forward to providing further updates to plan members once we have confirmed transition details with Manulife.”   

Until the transition occurs, Great-West Life will continue to be the university's benefits provider, and there are no changes to the existing benefits plan coverages or the claim submission process.

Find out more about next steps and FAQs on the HR website. Employees can also send questions about the benefits review to benefits.project@queensu.ca.

Celebrating inspiring women

The Ban Righ Foundation honours a faculty member and a local community builder.

The Ban Righ Foundation will be holding its fourth annual Inspiring Women event at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts on Oct. 23.

The event, which is free to attend and open to the public, celebrates women who inspire and make a difference in the community. In addition to the awards ceremony, the evening will feature a keynote by Stephanie Simpson, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion) and will include performances by poet Britta B, jazz singer Michelle Kasaboski, and the Queen's Indigenous Women Drummers.

This year, the Ban Righ Foundation is recognizing the exemplary work of Dr. Louise Rang, with the Mentorship Award, and Georgina Riel, with the Leadership Award.

The Ban Righ Foundation Mentorship Award recognizes a Queen’s University faculty member who identifies as a woman and has demonstrated mentorship and knowledge-sharing, has supported or continues to support women in achieving their goals, and has inspired a student or students.

The Ban Righ Foundation Leadership Award is given to an individual who identifies as a woman and whose leadership has built capacity and fostered opportunities for others, made positive contributions to the Kingston community, and has been inspirational.

“We are delighted to support female leadership by recognizing the extraordinary work of this year’s award recipients,” says Susan Belyea, Director of the Ban Righ Centre. “It is thanks to women like Dr. Louise Rang and Georgina Riel that the Queen’s and Kingston communities continue to thrive and foster inclusivity.”

[Dr. Louise Rang]
Dr. Louise Rang

Ban Righ Foundation 2019 Mentorship Award – Dr. Louise Rang

Dr. Louise Rang is an attending emergency physician and assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Queen’s. She is described as an inspiring and thoughtful person who has helped countless students transition from “timid residents, to confident emergency physicians.”

Throughout her career, Dr. Rang has helped build support networks for work-related trauma, and has become a mentor and friend to many.

Her award nomination states: “To sustain is to strengthen. Dr. Rang mindfully sustains those around her through troughs, peaks, and every curve in between. She is a true mentor and most deserving of recognition.”

[Georgina Riel]
Georgina Riel

Ban Righ Foundation 2019 Leadership Award – Georgina Riel

Georgina Riel is the owner of Riel Cultural Consulting and is a traditional knowledge caretaker, educator and community builder. She is known to be outspoken, warm and empathetic, with an inherent ability to connect with others.

Among her many contributions to the community, Riel has helped bring Indigenous knowledge and histories into the education system, at cultural events and through the establishment of political groups and social service organizations.

“Whether in the public sector, the non-profit world, correctional services or the private sector, Georgina Riel has worked to bring people together, to highlight traditional Indigenous knowledge and to foster healthy communities and working environments.”

The 2019 Ban Righ Inspiring Women event will be held on Wednesday Oct. 23, 7:30 pm at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts

To learn more about the event, visit the Queen’s University Events Calendar.

For The Record: Sept. 26, 2019

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

The next issue of For the Record will be published Thursday, Oct. 10. The deadline for submitting information is Tuesday, Oct. 8. For the Record is published bi-weekly throughout the academic year and monthly during the summer.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette Editor Andrew Carroll.

Headship Selection Committee - Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dr. Michael Greenspan’s term as Head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering ends June 30, 2020.

In accordance with the terms of Article 41 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University, a selection committee will be formed to consider the present state and future prospects of the department, and to assist the Provost and Vice Principal (Academic) in the selection of a department head. Members of the bargaining unit will elect five members. Faculty, staff and students are also invited to nominate staff and students from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and faculty from cognate disciplines, for membership on the selection committee. Nominations should be sent to Kevin J. Deluzio (Chair), c/o Brooke Kelly (brooke.kelly@queensu.ca), Staffing Officer, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science by Oct. 21, 2019.

Headship Selection Committee - Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining

Dr. Takis Katsabanis’ term as Head of the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining ends June 30, 2020.

In accordance with the terms of Article 41 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University, a selection committee will be formed to consider the present state and future prospects of the department, and to assist the Provost and Vice Principal (Academic) in the selection of a department head. Members of the bargaining unit will elect five members. Faculty, staff and students are also invited to nominate staff and students from the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining and faculty from cognate disciplines, for membership on the selection committee. Nominations should be sent to Mark Green (Chair), c/o Brooke Kelly (brooke.kelly@queensu.ca), Staffing Officer, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science by Oct. 21, 2019.

Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of Gender Studies

Dr. Samantha King’s term as Head of the Department of Gender Studies will end on Dec. 30, 2019. The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) has appointed a Selection Committee to advise him on the appointment of the next Head. The Selection Committee has the following membership:

Dr. Liz Brulé, Assistant Professor, Department of Gender Studies
Dr. Laila Haidarali, Associate Professor, Department of Gender Studies
Dr. Melissa Houghtaling, Adjunct Professor, Department of Gender Studies
Dr. Margaret Little, Professor, Department of Gender Studies
Dr. Katherine McKittrick, Professor, Department of Gender Studies
Dr. Susanne Soederberg, Cognate Faculty, Professor, Dept of Global Development Studies
Terrie Easter Sheen, Administrative Assistant / Graduate Assistant
Christopher Bennett, Graduate Student, Department of Gender Studies
Cicely Haggerty, Undergraduate Student, Department of Gender Studies
Dr. Betsy Donald, Associate Dean (School of Graduate Studies)
Dr. Gordon E. Smith, (Chair) Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations)
Danielle Gugler, (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Gender Studies and nominations and self-nominations for the Headship are invited. Please respond in confidence to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca) by noon, Oct. 3, 2019.

All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the confidential record of decision-making.

At the request of either the Department members or the Committee, a meeting can be arranged between the Department and the Committee to ascertain the Department’s views on the qualities of a Head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the Department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of French Studies

Dr. Stéphane Inkel’s term as Interim Head of the Department of French Studies is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) has appointed a Selection Committee to advise him on the appointment of the next Head. The Selection Committee has the following membership:

Joanne Bénard, Associate Professor, Department of French Studies
Julien Lefort-Favreau, Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies
Michael Reyes, Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies
Donald Sackey, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies
Isabelle St-Amand, Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies
Stéphanie Martel, Cognate Faculty, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Studies
Agathe Nicholson, Departmental Administrator, Department of French Studies
Nicole Pede, Undergraduate Representative, Department of French Studies
Betsy Donald, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies
Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of French Studies are invited by Oct. 4, 2019. Names of possible candidates for the Headship may also be submitted. Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca). All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making. At the request of either the Department members or the Committee, a meeting can be arranged between the Department and the Committee to ascertain the Department’s views on the qualities of a Head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the Department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Abridged Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of Philosophy

Dr. Christine Sypnowich’s term as Head of the Department of Philosophy is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. Dr. Sypnowich is willing to consider reappointment.

In accordance with the terms of Article 41 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, an abridged Selection Committee has been struck to assist the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) in the selection of the next Head. Under the rules of the Collective Agreement, members of the Bargaining Unit within the Department of Philosophy have elected the following people to the committee:

Dr. Steve Leighton, Professor
Dr. Jon Miller, Professor
Dr. Margaret Moore, Professor
Dr. Josh Mozersky, Associate Professor
Dr. Sergio Sismondo, Professor
The committee will be chaired by Vice-Dean Gordon E. Smith.

Under Article 41.3.3, if the Head indicates that s/he wants to be renewed, “the abridged Selection Committee shall consult with the members of the Department, and if it concludes that there is a clear departmental consensus in favour of renewal, it shall recommend to the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) that the Head be renewed.” If the Committee concludes that there is no clear consensus for renewal, a full committee shall than be constituted.

To assist in this consultation process, you are invited to express your views on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Philosophy and whether you favour renewal of the present Head. If you wish to offer comments on these matters, please be advised that your letter will be reviewed by the Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making. Please send all comments to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca) by Oct. 4, 2019.

SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES

Job Title: Plumber (CUPE 229)
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J0719-0622
Successful Candidate: Jonathan Rockel

Job Title: Departmental Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Undergraduate Admission and Recruitment
Competition: J0719-0196
Successful Candidate: Valerie Thomas (Student Records & Services)

Job Title: Receptionist and Recruitment Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Career Services
Competition: J0719-0108
Successful Candidate: Chanmeet Kaur (Student Records & Services)

Job Title: Non-Academic Misconduct Intake Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Support Services and Community Engagement
Competition: J0619-0834
Successful Candidate: Katherine Phillips (Student Services)

Job Title: Information Services Technician (CUPE 1302)
Department: Library Services
Competition: J0819-0201
Successful Candidate: Daniella Cruz

Job Title: Marketing and Communications Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Law
Competition: J0719-0150
Successful Candidate: Lucy Schafer

Job Title: Administrative Clerk
Department: Emergency Medicine
Competition: J0719-0647
Successful Candidate: Caitlin Chamberlain

Job Title: Student Affairs Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Undergraduate Medical Education, School of Medicine
Competition: J0419-0939
Successful Candidate: Erin Meyer (Undergraduate Medical Education)

Job Title: Study Coordinator
Department: Canadian Cancer Trials Group
Competition: J0619-1099
Successful Candidate: Akunne Ndika

Job Title: Graduate Assistant, Online Programs (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Education
Competition: J0519-0712
Successful Candidate: Chrystalla Frantzeskos (School of Business)

Job Title: L2 Service Support Analyst (USW Local 2010)
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: J0719-0678
Successful Candidate: Jesse Kimber (Information Technology Services)

Job Title: Electro-Mechanical Technologist (CUPE 254)
Department: Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
Competition: J0719-0568
Successful Candidate: Vanessa Wood

Job Title: Educational Projects & Special Programs Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Undergraduate Medical Education
Competition: J0519-0851
Successful Candidate: Rachel Bauder (Undergraduate Medical Education)

Job Title: Dermatology Divisional Assistant
Department: Department of Medicine
Competition: J0519-0272
Successful Candidate: Melissa Joynt

Job Title: Student Client Services Representative (USW Local 2010)
Department: Awards
Competition: J0719-1086
Successful Candidate: Alexandra Keith

Job Title: Educational Support Specialist (USW Local 2010)
Department: Engineering Teaching and Learning
Competition: J0719-0268
Successful Candidate: Danielle D'Souza

Job Title: Communications and Administrative Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Student Academic Success Services
Competition: J0719-0463
Successful Candidate: Charly Foote (Office of Advancement, Gift Services)

Job Title: Administrative and Finance Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Library
Competition: J0719-0937
Successful Candidate: Joseph Lee (Library)

Job Title: Project Manager
Department: International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation
Competition: J0719-0343
Successful Candidate: Carol Mieras

Job Title: Program Assistant
Department: Department of Family Medicine
Competition: J0719-1079
Successful Candidate: Katreena Davis

Job Title: Practicum Placement Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Education
Competition: J0719-0635
Successful Candidate: Hailey Murphy (Faculty of Education)

Job Title: Managing Editor, Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health (JMVFH)
Department: Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research (CIMVHR)
Competition: J0619-0355
Successful Candidate: Lacey Cranston (Faculty of Health Sciences)

Job Title: Undergraduate Program Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Global Development Studies
Competition: J0619-0936
Successful Candidate: Carrie Roosenmaallen (Student Services - Art and Science )

Job Title: Academic Advisor and Assistant Consideration Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Department of Student Services, Faculty of Arts and Science
Competition: J0619-0113
Successful Candidate: Jennifer Lucas (History)

Job Title: Finanical Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Medicine
Competition: J0619-0955
Successful Candidate: Kevin Panchalingam

Job Title: Educational Consultant
Department: Medicine
Competition: J0819-0202
Successful Candidate: Lindsay Crawford (Medicine)

Job Title: Occupational Therapist
Department: Family Medicine
Competition: J0619-0491
Successful Candidate: Madison Fugard

Job Title: Payroll Administrator
Department: Financial Services
Competition: J0719-1111
Successful Candidate: Sarah Heeney (Human Resources)

Teaching truth and reconciliation in Canada

 

Drum Circle for Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Students, faculty members and staff take part in a drumming circle hosted by the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program to mark the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Final Report in December 2015.

Where do we start?

Our question echoes our larger work supporting and educating teacher candidates, and our personal commitments seeking to act as witnesses to the need for reconciliation in Canada.

As researchers, teachers and administrators — one of whom is of Anishinaabe, German, and French heritage and one of whom is a longstanding non-Indigenous ally of Irish, Scottish and English ancestry — we have dedicated our careers to education for and about Indigenous people, and to Indigenous-led ally-building in education.

So, we start by acknowledging the situation. We are acutely aware of the historic and ongoing legacy of colonialism and racism that pervades Canadian society, and the specific role that education had in creating and perpetuating this legacy. Indeed, in Canada the education system has been a tool for genocide through the residential school system.

Truth and reconciliation

At the same time, we acknowledge that we have tremendous hope. We see self-determination and resilience in Indigenous communities, and increasing willingness, unimaginable a generation ago, in the general Canadian population to acknowledge history and move forward in a better way. And we acknowledge that we are teaching and learning in an era where, after the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, we know more about colonial legacies. We have more guidance on what to do moving forward than ever before.

Teacher education offers a path forward

In our personal actions, we start where we are. For us, this means working together and with the teachers and teachers-to-be whom we encounter in our work at our Faculty of Education at Queen’s University. The Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) at Queen’s University that we both work with qualifies graduates for Ontario College of Teachers certification and provides a focus on Indigenous education in their teacher preparation. This program has over 400 primarily Indigenous graduates. We stand in awe of the change they have made at all levels of education; we are excited to follow where this change leads next. We deeply believe in decolonized, self-determined, authentically Indigenized education.

At the same time, it is unfair to expect already marginalized people to shoulder the full burden of educating the mainstream population and creating social change, as is often the case. We believe it is a vital part of our jobs to facilitate the learning of settler teachers so they can see their roles and responsibilities in the reconciliatory process. As Senator Murray Sinclair, Chair of the TRC, told the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples:

“I’ll tell you what gets me through it now and got me through it then, and that is the belief that you don’t have to believe that reconciliation will happen; you have to believe that reconciliation must happen … and you have to do what you can to make it happen.”

Our teacher candidates come from a variety of backgrounds. In addition to the teacher candidates who come from diverse Indigenous nations and heritages, we work with teacher candidates who are racialized, some of whom also carry post-colonial histories both internal to and external to North America. However, the majority of teacher candidates in our faculty are settler people of diverse European heritages. Given their diverse backgrounds, our teacher candidates engage with Canada’s legacy of colonization in different ways. We also spend time working with qualified teachers to respond to inquiries about how to address truth and reconciliation in their teaching practice.

Overcome guilt, find courage

For many teachers and teacher candidates, especially those who are non-Indigenous, the biggest obstacle we now see is fear — these educators want to do the right thing but they are afraid of making the problem worse, of being guilty of cultural appropriation, of offending or misinforming.

Many teachers have come from educational backgrounds that offered little in the way of Indigenous education content, and have not been challenged to think about power and privilege, or how various kinds of privilege intersect. They are now called to include Indigenous perspectives that they didn’t have the opportunity learn themselves, which presents an obvious challenge. As educators still learning (as we all are), we empathize with feelings of anxiety and inadequacy.

In addition to a lack of education, we are aware that another barrier can be caused by what University of Washington whiteness studies scholar Robin DiAngelo describes as “white fragility,” which includes “anger, withdrawal, emotional incapacitation, guilt, argumentation and cognitive dissonance, (all of which reinforce the pressure on facilitators to avoid directly addressing racism).”

These emotions can be paralyzing. We tell our settler students: You can cry. You can feel angry. You have a huge burden to carry. But do not stop at guilt. Guilt is unproductive. Even if the ongoing legacy of colonization is not your fault, it is your responsibility, and you do benefit from it. So to move forward in a spirit of right relations, it’s important to recognize what is going on and what you can do about it. That doesn’t mean taking over, or taking charge of the reconciliatory process, since meaningful reconciliation needs to be led by Indigenous people. It does mean listening, really listening, in the effort to find fitting paths forward. We know that inaction in itself is a choice and an action.

No reconciliation without truth

So, the first step in becoming an ally is witnessing. Being a good witness involves deep listening — full attention, openness, the ability to be present without judging and accurate recall. Sharing what is witnessed is about enacting the responsibility to promote right relations by widening the circle of learning and understanding.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) gifted us with 94 Calls to Action that have provided valuable guidance on how to proceed in supporting and furthering truth and reconciliation. The Calls to Action are practical, easy to understand and apply to all Canadians.

Inspired by the Calls to Action, an abundance of resources exist to help guide action. For example, The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation produces invaluable resources to help people grow as allies. The Assembly of First Nations and the Montreal Indigenous Community Network have also both created outstanding resources for aspiring allies.

We understand that for many Indigenous people, reconciliation is a meaningless term in a time when social inequity is still rampant and the legacy of residential schools and Indian day schools is still so visible. There cannot be reconciliation without truth. There can also be no reconciliation without Indigenous leadership, language and culture perpetuation, equal sharing of resources and meaningful consultation on issues such as resource extraction and relationships to land, air and water.

If we want to build something better for generations yet to come, each person must answer their own unique call to work for truth and reconciliation, which means noticing and responding to the particular circumstances and realities surrounding them.

The work has started. We have nowhere to go but forward.

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Lindsay Morcom is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Education at Queen's University. Kate Freeman is the Manager of the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program of the Queen's Faculty of Education.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

The Conversation is seeking new academic contributors. Researchers wishing to write articles should contact Melinda Knox, Associate Director, Research Profile and Initiatives, at knoxm@queensu.ca.

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