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Queen’s proposed student centre design wins national architecture award

John Deutsch University Centre (JDUC) recognized with 2019 Award of Excellence for revitalization plans.

Exterior rendering of the proposed JDUC redevelopment design.
Exterior rendering of the proposed JDUC redevelopment design.

Canadian Architect magazine recognized the proposed design for a revitalized John Deutsch University Centre (JDUC) with a 2019 Award of Excellence recently. For 53 years, the annual award program has highlighted exceptional architectural projects during the design stage. Prize jurors lauded the plans for its sustainability features, its focus on increasing accessibility, and for seamlessly blending historic and contemporary design.

JDUC interior rendering
JDUC design interior rendering.

“The JDUC has served as a central student hub on campus for more than 70 years and has been integral to the student experience here at Queen’s,” says John Witjes, Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities). “Our team has worked closely with Queen’s student representatives and the architectural teams to imagine a revitalized JDUC that will encourage learning and community, and be open and inclusive to everyone.”

The redevelopment plan, designed by architects from HDR + MJMA, includes a refreshed look for the facility, the addition of new study and social areas for undergraduate and graduate students, rooms for campus clubs and student services, and accessible entrances and amenities. The proposed sustainability features have been designed to meet the requirements for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification.

Spearheaded by the Alma Mater Society (AMS) and Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS), the redevelopment project was conditionally approved by Queen’s University’s Board of Trustees in March 2019.

“This is an intelligent and effective addition in the heart of an established university campus,” says Joe Lobko, an award juror whose comments were shared by Canadian Architect. “It creates a beautiful and convincing student gathering place while strongly marking its corner site and providing a welcoming invitation to this part of the campus. It knits old and new, but allows each to be of its time.”

Cross-section view of JDUC design.
Cross-section view of JDUC design.

Under the Queen’s-supported proposal, the AMS and SGPS will contribute $50.5 million over 25 years, through a student fee levy – contributions confirmed during graduate and undergraduate referendums in February 2018 and January 2019. Queen’s will support the initiative with a contribution of $11.8 million, including $1.8 million from the university’s operating funds, and $10 million in donor support. Fundraising for the project is underway.

JDUC design exterior rendering.
JDUC design exterior rendering.

“It is a priority for Queen’s to invest in the creation of spaces that support our students, giving them the resources they need to live, study, gather, build community, and access support services that will enable them to thrive,” says Karen Bertrand, Vice-Principal (Advancement). “We are now turning to our alumni and friends with the hope they will be inspired and contribute to this important project.”

Construction will begin once the JDUC revitalization project meets its fundraising target and the Board of Trustees grants final approval.

Disability, more than the wheelchair

This submission to the Together We Are blog is written by Xin Sun, a recent Queen’s graduate and an active member of the Queen’s and Kingston communities as a disability and social justice advocate. In her piece, she discusses the importance of unlearning narrow understandings of disability and accessibility.

The International Symbol of Access (ISA) has over 50 years of history. The symbol was originally designed in the 1960s by Danish design student, Susanne Koefoed. The sign is commonly seen as a white icon of a person in a wheelchair, against a blue background. This symbol is used as an indication that a facility is accessible to people with disabilities. For instance, the ISA can be spotted in accessible parking lots, accessible entrances, and accessible washrooms, etc. In recent years, a proposal was put out by a group named The Accessible Icon Project, to redesign the symbol, and came up with the Dynamic Symbol of Access, it became an improvement of the old symbol. But it is nowhere near perfect.

As much as having a signage for accessibility for persons with disabilities is important in order to create a barrier-free and an inclusive environment; it is also important to note, not everyone with a disability uses a wheelchair. However, this blog is not to criticize the International Symbol of Access per se, it is aimed to educate and inform the public that, disability is more than the wheelchair. People in the general public, especially the able-bodied population, really needed to have open-mindedness when they encounter someone with a disability.

When someone is identified as disabled and is a wheelchair user, it usually means that the person has limited or loss of mobility.  This could be due to an injury or an illness. However, wheelchair users are only a fraction of people with disabilities, and it cannot and should not represent the disabled community entirely. There are other causes and disabilities that one can be identified as having, without using a wheelchair. These people may include: people with chronic and/or terminal illnesses – in most cases, these illnesses are invisible and known as “invisible disabilities;” people with impairments (i.e. Hearing or Vision); people with mental illnesses or disorders; people with intellectual disabilities; people with undiagnosed medical conditions; and, people who don’t always need or use (mobility) aids or devices. Often times, these people with disabilities listed above have their access denied, are discriminated against, and are even shamed when using barrier-free facilities, simply because they aren’t a wheelchair user or their disability is invisible.

Let me give you a personal example. I identify as a person with disabilities. I am vision impaired and I have chronic illnesses. Because of my visual impairment, I use a white cane in public. As you may know, the white cane is a symbol of blindness and visual impairment. With the cane, people around me in public are aware that I am vision impaired.  However, while my white cane is a symbol for my visual impairment, my chronic illnesses, are very much invisible. Why? Because I don’t use any aids or devices.

Let’s set up a scenario for you. Let’s say, I try to get on a bus, and I get on the bus with my white cane. People are likely to know that a blind or vision impaired person is getting on the bus, they are likely to try to move out of the way for me, and, they may even help me find a seat in the priority seating area on the bus. However, more often than not, the reason why I needed a seat on the bus, is not just because I am vision impaired; it’s also because, due to my chronic illnesses, I am unable to stand for longer periods of time, and it’s especially difficult to stand in a moving bus. But, it’s very unlikely that people will know about my chronic illnesses, because I don’t “look like” I have any other disabilities, other than the apparent one.

Now, let’s change the scenario a bit, if I get on the same bus, this time without my white cane. What would happen then? Would there be anyone making room for me? Would there be anyone giving up their seat for me? Unlikely. And why is that? That’s because, without my white cane, I don’t fit into the social stereotype of being blind or vision impaired and, let alone others will even notice I have invisible disabilities. From the above example, I hope you realize that, not all disabilities are visible. Disability is also a spectrum. Even putting two people together with the same disability or medical conditions, their lived experiences won’t always necessarily be the same. Therefore, it is so important to recognize, each and every one of us is unique, and this is the same for people with or without disabilities. And having a disability doesn’t always necessarily equal being in a wheelchair either.

Queen’s Reads sparks meaningful conversations on campus

'The Boy on the Beach' panel event for common reading program fosters discussion around the global refugee crisis.

Queen's Reads panel discusses The Boy on the Beach
Panel members discuss the Queen's Reads featured book, The Boy on the Beach, by Tima Kurdi. From left: Lauren Di Felice, Pathy Foundation Fellow; Wessam Ayad from the KEYS Job Centre; Sharry Aiken, an associate professor in the Faculty of Law; Yu Jier Kou of Immigrant Services of Kingston and Area; and Reena Kukreja, an assistant professor in Global Development and Cultural Studies. (Supplied photo)

Building on the success of the 2019-20 Queen’s Reads program, the Student Experience Office (SEO) held a panel event to discuss key themes from this year’s literary selection.

The Boy on the Beach is a true story about the family of Alan Kurdi, the two-year-old boy who became the global emblem for the Syrian refugee crisis after his body washed up on a beach and was photographed.

Author Tima Kurdi, Alan’s aunt, is now an internationally-recognized spokesperson on the global refugee crisis.

Kurdi’s poignant memoir explores many important topics, including newcomer experiences, the global refugee crisis, and the politicization of tragedy.

The panel event, entitled The Global Refugee Crisis and Our Community’s Role, brought together students, staff, and community members to discuss the scope of the refugee crisis and what is being done on a local and federal level.

Attendees gathered in Mitchell Hall to hear from a group of experts and individuals who have experienced the effects of the global refugee crisis.

The panelists included: Reena Kukreja, an assistant professor in Global Development and Cultural Studies; Wessam Ayad from the KEYS Job Centre; Sharry Aiken, an associate professor in the Faculty of Law; Lauren Di Felice, Pathy Foundation Fellow; and Yu Jier Kou of Immigrant Services of Kingston and Area.

“I appreciated the diversity of the guest speakers on the panel, and enjoyed hearing their perspectives,” says Angela Sahi, a third-year Global Development Studies student who attended the event. “I was also able to better understand the local context of this global crisis through the focus on migrant experiences in Kingston.”

The Student Experience Office, a unit of Student Affairs, conducts the Queen’s Reads program every year, which aims to engage the Queen’s community in a productive and meaningful dialogue.

This year, the Student Experience Office has distributed more than 4,000 free copies of The Boy on the Beach to students and members of the Queen’s community. Due to the overwhelming success of this year’s program, the Student Experience Office will be starting a “pass it on” campaign to ensure that all students who wish to read the book will have the opportunity.

“We are excited that students, faculty and staff have been participating in programming and reading The Boy on the Beach," says Kevin CollinsStudent Development Coordinator and the organizer of the Queen's Reads program. "Tima Kurdi will be visiting our campus on March 11 to speak to students and Kingston and Queen’s community members.”

To learn more about Queen’s Reads, visit the Student Experience Office website.

A star among the stars

Queen’s University Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald is the special guest at the next Observatory Open House.

[Queen's Observatory]
The Queen's Observatory is hosting its next monthly open house on Saturday, Dec. 14, with special guest speaker Queen’s Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald. 

The Queen’s Observatory is offering the public a unique opportunity to hear from someone who has helped push the boundaries of our understanding of how the universe works. Queen’s Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald will be on hand at this month’s observatory open house to share the story of how he travelled deep underground to study the sun.

Observatory coordinator Connor Stone says Dr. McDonald will also speak about the exciting research that is now flowing from his Nobel Prize-winning work.

“Seeing a Nobel Laureate speak is a rare opportunity to share in their wonder as they explain some amazing research,” says Stone, who was nominated by Dr. McDonald earlier this year to attend the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. “Dr. McDonald’s research is especially interesting as it comes from a Canadian collaboration and has opened the door to new questions in physics that we are still trying to answer to this day.”

Joining Queen’s in 1989 as a professor in the physics department, Dr. McDonald worked as the director of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), the world’s deepest underground laboratory. The SNO team discovered that neutrinos – sub-atomic particles considered one of the basic building blocks of the universe – change from one type to another on their journey to Earth from the sun.

Dr. McDonald is the co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into neutrinos, one of the fundamental particles that make up the universe. He was also recently named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

After the presentation by the Nobel Laureate, guests will have an opportunity to look through various telescopes and participate in physics experiments.

“The Queen's Observatory monthly events provide a wonderful opportunity for the public to look at the heavens through an actual telescope on campus and learn about astronomy,” says Dr. McDonald. “I will be talking about how we use unusual particles called neutrinos with a detector two kilometres underground at SNOLAB near Sudbury to study the sun in unique ways. It is part of the new wave of measurements called multi-messenger astronomy and it will be a pleasure to share our work with the public at this event.”

The event is scheduled to start at 7:30 pm on Saturday, Dec. 14 at the Biosciences Complex, 116 Barrie St.

For information visit the website or the Facebook page.

Principal’s Holiday Reception celebrates Queen’s staff and faculty

  • Queen's staff and faculty members ;line up to fill their plates during the Principal's Holiday Reception.
    Queen's staff and faculty members ;line up to fill their plates during the Principal's Holiday Reception.
  • Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane speaks with staff members of the university during the Principal's Holiday Reception.
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane speaks with staff members of the university during the Principal's Holiday Reception.
  • The Principal's Holiday Reception is an opportunity for Queen's community members to meet up with their colleagues from across the university.
    The Principal's Holiday Reception is an opportunity for Queen's community members to meet up with their colleagues from across the university.
  • Queen's faculty and staff members fill the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre for Wednesday's Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane speaks with staff members of the university during the Principal's Holiday Reception.
    Queen's faculty and staff members fill the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre for Wednesday's Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane speaks with staff members of the university during the Principal's Holiday Reception.
  • A wide range of tasty treats are available during the Principal's Holiday Reception, a highlight of Staff Appreciation Day.
    A wide range of tasty treats are available during the Principal's Holiday Reception, a highlight of Staff Appreciation Day.
  • Staff and faculty members who made a donation to the AMS Food Bank were entered into the draw for the special draw, this year featuring Mitchell Hall.
    Staff and faculty members who made a donation to the AMS Food Bank were entered into the draw for the special draw, this year featuring Mitchell Hall.
  • Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane thanks faculty and staff members for their ongoing contributions to the university.
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane thanks faculty and staff members for their ongoing contributions to the university.
  • Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald, third from left, helps celebrate the Special Recognition for Staff Award for the team members of the Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute.
    Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald, third from left, helps celebrate the Special Recognition for Staff Award for the team members of the Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute.

The contributions of Queen’s University staff and faculty were celebrated on Wednesday, Dec. 11, during Principal’s Holiday Reception.

The annual celebration is the highlight of Staff Appreciation Day and is hosted by Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane in the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre.

“Thank you to all the staff and faculty who work so hard throughout the year to advance Queen’s and its mission,” says Principal Deane. “What’s wonderful about working at a university is the great variety of roles undertaken by people at this institution and how each and every one adds up to something critically important – the transformation that occurs in the lives of the students, the improvement in the quality of life in our community and more broadly the advancement of human knowledge. We all have an integral part to play in this broader mission and I hope you find it a source of great pride.”

The reception offered a wide selection of delicious food and drinks, while staff and faculty members mingled and reconnected with colleagues from across the university. Human Resources also organized a series of tours, workshops, and wellness activities throughout the day for staff, while Sodexo retail outlets offered up a free warm beverage to Queen’s employees in the morning.

Attendees of the Principal’s Holiday Reception donated approximately 150 pounds of non-perishable food items and more than $200 to the AMS Food Bank.

During the event Principal Deane called attention to this year’s recipients of the Special Recognition for Staff Awards. The annual awards are presented to staff members who were nominated by colleagues for their outstanding work performed at a level “significantly beyond what is usually expected.” The awards were handed out at a special ceremony hosted by Principal Deane on Tuesday, Dec. 3.

Queen’s remembers Maggie McIver

The Queen’s community is remembering Margaret (Maggie) McIver, a reference assistant in the Queen’s University Library. She died on Dec. 4 at the age of 57 after a period of illness.

McIver, who began at Queen’s Library in 2011, worked in several library locations, including Bracken Health Sciences Library and the Education Library. She was a much-loved member of the library team, and will be deeply missed. An accomplished musician, McIver was a talented snare drummer who played with various pipe bands. She also played the fiddle, had a degree in fine art, and loved to draw and paint.

“Maggie was a very conscientious person who wanted to be sure she was learning and doing all she could to help co-workers and library users,” says Sarah Wickett, Interim Head of Bracken Health Sciences Library and one of McIver’s supervisors. “She had a calm, kind presence. During breaks and lunches Maggie could sometimes be heard practising her drumming in our mail room. She spoke often of her family and I loved talking with her about the joys and journey of parenting.”

McIver was predeceased by her father, George, and her sister, Sue. She is survived by mother, Elizabeth Staveley, stepfather Bob Staveley, husband Ross, and their three children Susan, Alasdair and Islay, sisters Martha and Sheila and their families, mother-in-law Molly Brown, brother-in-law Scott Brown and his family, and several aunts, uncles and cousins.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, Dec. 14 at 11 am at First Christian Reformed Church, 310 Kingscourt Ave., Kingston.

family obituary is available online and a remembrance article is available on the pipes|drums website.

Daycare working group formed

Queen's community will be consulted during review of the university’s approach to providing on-site daycare.

The Queen’s Day Care Centre, an independent non-profit organization with spaces for 81 children in its two locations on campus, has been providing high-quality childcare to the Queen’s and Kingston community for over 50 years. The university provides financial support and space for the Queen’s Day Care Centre.

The provision of daycare services across Ontario has undergone change in the past several years arising from the introduction of full-day junior and senior kindergarten. More recent legislative changes also have the potential to affect day care in Ontario. Given these changes, and to better understand the university’s needs in supporting early childhood care and education for its employees and students, a review of the university’s approach to providing this important service for the community will be undertaken. Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has formed a Daycare Working Group, which includes faculty and staff, the rector, a graduate student, and representatives from Student Affairs, Finance, Indigenous Initiatives, and the Provost’s Office.

“The university remains committed to helping members of our community find and afford suitable childcare services,” says Provost Harris. “We do need to better understand the changing landscape of university-supported daycare services.”

The working group will consult broadly with the community, research the on-site day care models at other Canadian universities, collect information about day care centres in Kingston, and invite everyone in the Queen’s community to take part in an open survey early in the winter term. The group will then report to the Senior Leadership Team with recommendations about how to ensure the facilities at Queen’s remain accessible and continue to meet community needs in a financially sustainable way. 

Staff members go above and beyond

Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane presented this year’s Special Recognition for Staff Awards at a reception in Benidickson House.

  • Anita Ng receives Special Recognition for Staff Award
    Anita Ng receives her Special Recognition for Staff Award from Principal Patrick Deane, along with her nominators Krista Knight and Emily Briffett. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Beth Blackett receives Special Recognition for Staff Award
    Beth Blackett holds her Special Recognition for Staff Award as she stands with her nominator Kate Humphrys and Principal Deane. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Brenda Bullock receives Special Recognition for Staff Award
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane presents Brenda Bullock with her Special Recognition for Staff Award along with her nominator Brenda Reed. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Jacquie Jamieson receives Special Recognition for Staff Award
    Jacquie Jamieson receives a Special Recognition for Staff Award during a special ceremony hosted by Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Jo-Anne Tinlin receives Special Recognition for Staff Award
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane presents Jo-Anne Tinlin with a Special Recognition for Staff Award. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute team receives Special Recognition for Staff Award
    Members of the Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute received the team Special Recognition for Staff Award. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Pamela Hay-Melia receives Staff Appreciation Award
    Pamela Hay-Melia and her nominator Kim Murphy stand with Principal Deane as he presents the Special Recognition for Staff Award. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)
  • Robert Polegato receives Staff Appreciation Award
    Robert Polegato receives his Special Recognition for Staff Award from Principal Deane alongside his nominator John Witjes. (University Communications / Bernard Clark)

Queen’s relies on the contributions of its over 2,000 staff members to fulfill its academic mission. Each year, Queen’s recognizes the outstanding work of several employees through the Special Recognition for Staff Awards. These awards are organized by Human Resources, and they are presented to staff members who perform at a level “significantly beyond what is usually expected." They can be awarded to either individual staff members or teams. This year’s recipients received their awards during a reception at Benidickson House on Dec. 3. Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane was on hand to present the awards and thank the staff members for their hard work.   

“These awards provide an opportunity to recognize people who make Queen’s such a fantastic place to work,” says Principal Deane. “It’s important we take time to thank our colleagues who inspire us and take extra care to make our institution and the workplace so special.”

During Staff Appreciation Day on Dec. 11, a slideshow of the award winners will be on display at the Principal’s Holiday Reception. Listed below are this year’s recipients and excerpts from Principal Deane’s remarks about each of them.

Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute Team

  • Meghan Brien, Program Officer
  • Zachary Kenny, Communications Officer
  • Jennifer Low, HQP & Events Coordinator
  • Edward Nkole, Finance Officer
  • Alexandra Pedersen, Business Development Officer
  • Mark Richardson, Education and Outreach Officer
  • Edward Thomas, Associate Director of External Relations
  • Diana Turner, Administrative Assistant

The exceptional work accomplished by this team has benefited not only Queen’s but also the Canadian scientific community. It began in September 2016, when the Canada First Research Excellence Fund recognized astroparticle physics as a science priority area by awarding Queen’s and seven institutional partners $63.7 million to create a national network, focusing on research excellence, talent growth, community coordination, and knowledge translation.

Once formed, the team quickly got down to work to make the vision a reality by rolling out a variety of programs, including the launch of a newly branded institute and the hiring of 15 new faculty in cross-disciplinary positions and more than 100 post-docs, graduate and undergraduate students.

This prodigious output is due to the professionalism, enthusiasm, creativity, and work ethic of this small but dynamic team. Although they have diverse responsibilities, the staff work collaboratively and freely offer their skill sets to their colleagues to help them to reach their goals.

Beth Blackett, Peer Health Outreach Coordinator/Special Projects, Student Wellness Services
Since arriving at Queen’s in 2007, Beth has created and contributed to a multitude of wellness initiatives. As one of Queen’s first two mental health first aid trainers, Beth led the introduction of the ASIST Suicide Intervention training on campus. This is one of many innovative and rigorous training programs she has developed and delivers to literally thousands of students, staff and faculty each year. Beth also leads the Peer Health Education Team of student volunteers and supports the Campus Observation Room Volunteers.

Beth has played a significant role in policy development related to alcohol use, a smoke-free campus, sexual violence, and mental health. In addition to being a student mentor, she is a passionate innovator, using social media as a channel for the 15 Days of Exams Health Challenge. She has also introduced pet therapy, a healthy cooking club, and run club programs to students.

Brenda Bullock, Monographs Acquisition Coordinator, Stauffer Library
A problem-solver par excellence, Brenda’s investigative work takes place deep underground, invisible to the library patrons that she helps daily. As a member of the Library’s Monographs Acquisitions unit for the past 43 years, Brenda works in Stauffer Library, and before that, the Douglas Library. She tracks down and purchases all requests for library resources from librarians, faculty and other recommenders.

Brenda’s work is key to those who need her help to purchase materials; sometimes on a very short timeline and sometimes very difficult to get. A co-worker cordially describes her as a dog with a bone, one that does not give up the fight easily as she pursues even the most rare or unconventional resource. Her ability to locate a source for obscure items, from out-of-print books to online items, is legendary.

Pamela Hay-Melia, Administrative Assistant, Risk and Safety Services
Pamela is the cornerstone of coordination and support for the university’s Risk and Safety portfolio. The first thing that one notices about her is the ease with which she manages this busy and multi-faceted role. Due to a series of reorganizations, Pamela moved into a number of different roles in different offices in Richardson Hall over a very short period. These changes did not phase her. In fact, her positive spirit was an inspiration. She rolled up her sleeves and got the job done – no matter what the job was.

Her ability to complete tasks and projects, no matter how many hoops she has to jump through, is truly impressive. Everything she tackles is with a “can do” attitude. Colleagues describe her as a dedicated professional, an extremely hard-working employee and a thoughtful, caring, and kind human being.

Jacquie Jamieson, Executive Assistant to the Dean and Manager, Dean’s Office, Faculty of Arts and Science
Over a span of 13 years, Jacquie has supported three deans and an interim dean. She has a natural ability to adapt to different working styles and demands of these deans and of the associate deans, anticipating challenges, and proactively addressing issues.

The breadth of Jacquie’s impact is faculty wide. As well as mentoring staff both inside and outside the faculty office, Jacquie is a vital resource and advisor to the heads of nearly 30 departments, who regularly regale her with questions on a broad range of topics. For many new department heads, she is the first point of contact and a valuable counsellor as they learn their duties. Her awe-inspiring organizational skills and meticulous attention to detail are evident in her support of the merit process, impacting more than 500 faculty members.

Anita Ng, Operations Manager, Department of Medicine
Anita manages the complex issues within the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Kingston Health Sciences Centre that impact patient care delivery. Managing the largest department in the Faculty of Health Sciences, with 14 unique divisions, comes with its own challenges, all requiring different levels of support.

As operations manager, Anita ensures faculty and staff members’ well-being by proactively mitigating challenges and risks before a situation arises. She does this all with a positive attitude, no matter what challenge or risk she faces. Competent, fair and transparent, Anita is always willing to help anyone, no matter how busy she is. Her door always open. It also has a revolving feature, with staff and faculty coming and going all day long.

Robert Polegato, Project Manager, Physical Plant Services
For 19 years, Robert has managed large and complex capital projects, requiring a high level of commitment and focus. Robert has extensive knowledge of the construction industry and is dedicated to the success of his projects – quality-finished, on time, and on budget.

Some projects, especially those in older buildings, can be very challenging and require a team leader with exceptional skills to arrive at solutions. Robert is responsive and available at all hours to address issues arising on site. He is not just a builder; he is also a skilled leader and problem solver. Through his work on numerous projects, Robert has helped to improve the working and playing environment for students, staff, and faculty in nearly every university department. Our beautiful campus has benefited from his exemplary professional expertise.

Jo-Anne Tinlin, Research and Graduate Assistant, Department of Geography and Planning
Jo-Anne successfully balances the nitty-gritty detail of daily administrative work with compassion and care for new and incoming graduate students to the Department of Geography and Planning. Jo-Anne interacts with graduate students throughout their entire time in the program, from admission to graduation. She’s been known to learn the names of an entire cohort, seemingly after only one day of orientation.

Jo-Anne’s extraordinary customer service is the secret weapon in recruiting and retaining outstanding graduate students for the Master of Urban and Regional Planning programs. In an era of computerized admissions processes, her warmth and personal touch are strategic advantages. She assists students in their transition to Kingston life and is a constant, reliable source of advice on navigating the educational labyrinth at Queen’s.

Mary Wilson Trider appointed next Queen's Board of Trustees chair

Experienced healthcare executive begins four-year term on June 1, 2020.

Mary Wilson Trider
Mary Wilson Trider.

Queen’s has announced the appointment of Mary Wilson Trider (Com’82), an experienced healthcare sector executive and Queen’s alumna, as the next chair of the university's Board of Trustees. Her appointment marks the first time that a University Council representative on the board has been selected for this important role.

She will begin a four-year term as chair on June 1, 2020, succeeding Donald M. Raymond, who has served as chair since 2016. The Board’s Governance and Nominating Committee, following a thorough review and selection process led by Chancellor Jim Leech, recommended her nomination as chair to the wider board membership.

“Mary’s appointment as Chair of the Board of Trustees is a testament to the strengths and experience she has demonstrated while a member of both the board and University Council,” says Chancellor Leech. “Our trustees provide a wealth of knowledge and guidance to the university and Queen’s will be well-served by Mary’s strategic leadership skills.”

She first became a member of University Council in 2007 and was later elected by that body to sit as one of its six representatives on the Board of Trustees. University Council is one of the three bodies that participate in governance at the highest levels of the university, with its members elected by and from the vast network of Queen’s alumni. The council serves as both an advisory and ambassadorial body and it is responsible for the election of the Chancellor. At Queen’s Wilson Trider is currently a Board of Trustees Vice-Chair, chairs the board’s Audit and Risk Committee, and is a member of the Capital Assets and Finance Committee.

“I am honored and humbled by the opportunity to serve my alma mater as its next Board Chair and the first Council Trustee elected to this position,” says Wilson Trider. “Queen’s is an institution with a rich history. I look forward to working with Principal Deane and my Board colleagues to shape the University’s next chapter and ensuring Queen’s continues to be viewed as one of the best universities in Canada.”

Wilson Trider is President and CEO of Almonte General Hospital and Carleton Place & District Memorial Hospital. She is a graduate of the Smith School of Business and is a chartered professional accountant and a Fellow of CPA Ontario (FCPA, FCA). She has been active outside the university in a number of healthcare industry committees, and has prior board experience, including terms as chair of the United Way of York Region, Vice Chair of Booth Centennial Healthcare Linen Services, and as Treasurer of Ontario 211 Services Corporation.

“I’m pleased to welcome Mary into her new role as chair of the Board of Trustees,” says Patrick Deane, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “This is a critical time for Queen’s with the community engaged in a conversation about our future and the vision that will help guide us there. I look forward to working closely with Mary and her Board colleagues as we work to implement this emerging vision.”

Queen's commemorates 30th anniversary of l’École Polytechnique massacre

Permanent memorial announced as university marks National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

  • Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty lighting candles as the ceremony begins.
    Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty lighting candles as the ceremony begins.
  • The Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Kevin Deluzio, delivering opening remarks.
    The Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Kevin Deluzio, delivering opening remarks.
  • Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty commemorating each of those killed in the attack.
    Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty commemorating each of those killed in the attack.
  • Civil engineering student Haley Adams speaking about her design for a permanent Dec. 6 memorial that will be installed on campus in 2020.
    Civil engineering student Haley Adams speaking about her design for a permanent Dec. 6 memorial that will be installed on campus in 2020.
  • Jean Hutchinson, Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, speaking about the importance of equity and inclusion in engineering.
    Jean Hutchinson, Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, speaking about the importance of equity and inclusion in engineering.

The Queen’s community marked the 30th anniversary of the killing of 14 women at Montreal’s l’École Polytechnique on Friday.

Queen’s alumna included in online tribute

To commemorate the Dec. 6 tragedy and to promote the work of female engineers across Canada, Engineering Deans Canada invited each of the Canadian engineering schools that offered an accredited engineering program in 1989 to put forward the story of an engineering alumna who graduated within three years of the massacre (1986-1992), and whose career exemplifies the value that women bring to the engineering profession and to society. Queen’s is represented by Andrea Baptiste (Sc’88), an accomplished senior executive and entrepreneur who currently leads the Startup Ecosystem for Canada at Amazon. Her profile, and the other successful nominees, can be viewed at 30yearslater.ca.

During the ceremony, organized and hosted by the Engineering Society of Queen’s University, engineering students, staff, and faculty held roses, lit candles, and read brief statements about each victim and their accomplishments.

The event, held in the lobby of the Integrated Learning Centre, was attended by dozens of Queen’s community members, including students, faculty, staff, and administration members.

Twelve female engineering students, a nurse, and a faculty member were killed in the 1989 massacre. Three years after the attack, Dec. 6 was declared the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

Following the event, Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, announced the design that has been selected for a permanent Dec. 6 memorial in the Integrated Learning Centre. Created by Haley Adams, a third-year civil engineering student, the piece will be installed in 2020.

A call for designs, open to all members of the Queen’s community, was issued earlier this year by Dean Deluzio and the Engineering Society’s Memorial Design Committee.

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