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Call for Nominations – Board of Trustees and Senate

The University Secretariat is seeking nominations for the following positions:

Senate

• 1 Staff member (3-year term commencing Sept. 1, 2020)

• 1 Faculty member* (3-year term commencing Sept. 1, 2020)

Board of Trustees

• 1 Staff member (3-year term commencing June 1, 2020)

• 1 Faculty member (3-year term commencing June 1, 2020)

Are you eligible?

Almost all faculty and staff members at Queen’s can be nominated, or nominate themselves, for the Board of Trustees or Senate. Nomination forms and information about the nomination process are available online on the University Secretariat and Legal Counsel website or by contacting the University Secretariat at 613-533-6095.

*NOTE: Eligibility for faculty members on the Senate is under review. Please check back after Nov. 26 at https://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/elections/senate to ensure you are eligible. Adjunct 1 faculty and those holding an appointment at the level of Associate Dean or equivalent, and above, would not be eligible for faculty senator seats. 

When is a nomination due?

Nominations, by email or hard copy, need to be submitted to the University Secretariat, F300 Mackintosh-Corry Hall or to univsec@queensu.ca by 4 pm on Monday, Dec. 2, 2019.

In recognition of the value that diversity brings to governing bodies and in order to help us achieve the goal of reflecting the diversity of Canadian society, individuals from equity seeking groups such as women, racialized group members, Indigenous peoples, persons with a disability, and persons who identify in the LGBTQ+ community are encouraged to apply.

Please contact the University Secretariat should you have any questions at 613-533-6095 or univsec@queensu.ca

United Way campaign reaches two-thirds of overall goal

Launched on Oct. 1, the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $370,178 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington.

Thanks to the continued support of staff, faculty and retiree donations the campaign currently total $252,763, or 68.3 per cent of the final goal.

Last year, more than 58,000 people benefited from United Way KFL&A-funded programs.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. 

To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway and fill out the forms. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation.

Fall convocation concludes

  • The Four Directions Women Singers perform an honour song for Senator Murray Sinclair as he receives an honorary degree from Queen's University on Friday afternoon.
    The Four Directions Women Singers perform an honour song for Senator Murray Sinclair as he receives an honorary degree from Queen's University on Friday afternoon.
  • Senator Murray Sinclair, the Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission delivers a speech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's.
    Senator Murray Sinclair, the Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission delivers a speech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's.
  • A new graduate points out her family in Grant Hall as she takes a photo with Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane.
    A new graduate points out her family in Grant Hall as she takes a photo with Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane.
  • Ann Dowsett Johnston holds up her honorary degree
    Ann Dowsett Johnston holds up her honorary degree as she is congratulated by, from left: Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane; Rector Alex Da Silva; Vice-Provost and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies Fahim Quadir; and Chancellor Jim Leech.
  • Family members take photos as their graduate makes her way across the stage during Friday morning's convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
    Family members take photos as their graduate makes her way across the stage during Friday morning's convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
  • Rector Alex Da Silva speaks to the graduands as they prepare to be hooded and receive their degrees on Friday, Nov. 15.
    Rector Alex Da Silva speaks to the graduands as they prepare to be hooded and receive their degrees on Friday, Nov. 15.
  • A graduate smiles as she is hooded on the Grant Hall stage during Friday morning's ceremony, the sixth of Fall Convocation.
    A graduate smiles as she is hooded on the Grant Hall stage during Friday morning's ceremony, the sixth of Fall Convocation.
  • Graduands acknowledge the family members, friends and other supports who have helped them along the way during their studies at Queen's University.
    Graduands acknowledge the family members, friends and other supports who have helped them along the way during their studies at Queen's University.

Fall Convocation concluded on Friday with the final two ceremonies.

An honorary degree was conferred at each ceremony with bestselling author and award-winning journalist Ann Dowsett Johnston being recognized in the morning and former Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Senator Murray Sinclair in the afternoon session.

Over the past four days seven convocation ceremonies and the installation ceremony of Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane were held in Grant Hall over, with six honorary degrees being handed out.

More information about convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

A busy second day at Fall Convocation

  • Michael Polak receives a blanket
    Master of Management Innovation & Entrepreneurship graduate Michael Polak receives a blanket during the morning ceremony of Fall Convocation on Thursday.
  • A new graduate receives a hug after receiving her degree
    A new graduate receives a hug after crossing the stage at Grant Hall on Thursday, Nov. 14.
  • A graduate points at his family as they take a photo of him with Chancellor Jim Leech.
    A graduate from Smith School of Business points at his family as they take a photo of him and Chancellor Jim Leech.
  • A graduate shows her excitement as she is hooded during one of Thursday's three Fall Convocation ceremonies.
    A graduate shows her excitement as she is hooded during one of Thursday's three Fall Convocation ceremonies.
  • A mother of a graduate stands up from the crowd and waves as she takes a photo.
    A mother of a graduate stands up from the crowd and waves as she takes a photo.
  • A pair of graduates take in the moment as they are hooded on the Grant Hall stage during Thursday's second convocation ceremony.
    A pair of graduates take in the moment as they are hooded on the Grant Hall stage during Thursday's second convocation ceremony.

Fall Convocation continued for a second day at Queen’s University with three ceremonies at Grant Hall.

The ceremonies featured graduates from the Smith School of Business, School of Graduate Studies, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Arts and Science, and Faculty of Education.

Fall Convocation concludes on Friday with the final two of the seven ceremonies.

Live feeds of the ceremonies are available online.

For a full schedule, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Alcohol Policy review nears completion

Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris recently provided an update regarding the review of Queen’s Alcohol Policy, with the review expected to be complete by the beginning of 2020 and the revised policy brought into effect on May 1, 2020.

“Considerable feedback was received on the proposed changes throughout the consultation process and in the form of other submissions,” Provost Harris says. “We will take the time to consider this feedback as part of our review.”

The university began the review of its Alcohol Policy almost a year ago, holding more than 20 meetings with campus stakeholders, including multiple meetings with Alma Mater Society (AMS) and Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS) executives, campus pub managers, and many departments and faculties throughout the year before putting a draft policy up for wider community comment in September. Input was also received from representatives of the Post-Secondary Education Partnership-Alcohol Harms (PEP-AH) and Kingston Public Health. A review of the Alcohol Policy was last undertaken in 2012.

“Queen’s University is committed to fostering a safe and secure campus environment that supports health, safety, well-being, and success,” Provost Harris says. “The proposed changes are intended to reflect our commitment to harm reduction, risk mitigation, intervention, and enforcement strategies as outlined by the Post-Secondary Education Partnership-Alcohol Harms Framework that seeks to address high-risk drinking and alcohol harm reduction.”

Queen’s co-chairs PEP-AH’s National Advisory Committee and has been a member of the national network since 2016. The university also adopted the Okanagan Charter in 2018, and recently launched a Campus Wellness Project, all aimed at further promoting a safe and healthy campus community.

Community concerns around alcohol misuse at events such as unsanctioned street parties and St. Patrick’s Day celebrations led to the establishment by the City of Kingston of the University Safety District Initiative and Nuisance Party bylaw in 2018. The university’s administration and the Board of Trustees responded with a renewed focus on encouraging greater alcohol harm-reduction initiatives, and the Alcohol Policy is seen as a foundational step in developing a wider Campus Alcohol Strategy to coordinate the numerous initiatives being undertaken.

The Alcohol Policy applies to all members of the Queen’s community, including students, employees, alumni, visitors, and guests on university property and at university-sanctioned events that take place off-campus.  In line with the usual practice for new or revised policies, the draft policy was posted for public review and comment in late September. All feedback received through the public review process is being reviewed by the subcommittee of the Alcohol Working Group and will be forwarded to the Policy Advisory Subcommittee for further discussion. The final decision will be made by the university’s senior leadership team, which is chaired by Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane.

“Our primary purpose as an institution of higher learning is to provide a safe, inclusive, and respectful environment for our faculty, staff, and students to support our mission of education and research, not to facilitate the sale or consumption of alcohol,” Provost Harris says. “I’m confident the final document will reflect that purpose. We will certainly consider all of the thoughtful feedback we have before us.”

Any changes to the policy will be implemented in the spring, to give stakeholders time to ensure a smooth implementation over the summer in advance of the fall semester.

Queen's remembers Richard Sterling

The Queen's community is remembering Richard Sterling a plumber with Physical Plant Services (PPS) for the past 10 years. Sterling died suddenly on Nov. 10.

During his time at Queen's Sterling mentored many colleagues through his actions and applied passion to his endeavours in the workplace each day. His colleagues will miss the generosity of his time and will remember his sage advice. Although he never boasted, Sterling was very proud of his sons and his contributions to the Queen’s community including his service on the PPS Joint Health and Safety Committee and his work with CUPE Local 229.

A funeral will take place at noon on Thursday, Nov. 14.

An obituary is available online.  

Métis flag to fly on campus this weekend

Queen’s University will fly the Métis flag this weekend for our Métis campus community members observing Louis Riel Day. Louis Riel is a notable Canadian historical icon and Métis leader. Riel has been credited with playing an important role in the establishment of Manitoba into Confederation and as a protector of Métis culture. Riel was executed by the Canadian government on November 16, 1885.

Brenda Brouwer appointed Interim Dean of Smith School at Queen’s

Queen’s University is appointing Brenda Brouwer as the Interim Dean of Smith School of Business, effective Nov. 18, 2019.  

Brenda Brouwer

Dr. Brouwer recently completed a secondment with the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence as Head, Academic Partnerships. In this role she developed and led the talent development initiative cultivating relationships between the academy and industry to support a talent pipeline of master’s graduates with the skills, competencies and knowledge that organizations at the forefront of AI in Canada seek. Her time at Vector illustrated the importance of building networks between academies and organizations to promote knowledge and talent mobilization.

Prior to her secondment, Dr. Brouwer was the Vice-Provost and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies at Queen’s for eight years, preceded by five years as the Associate Dean in the School of Graduate Studies. During her tenure, she provided academic and administrative leadership which saw the expansion and development of graduate credentials including professional and applied advanced degrees, the development of resources that support academic excellence, and student well-being. She also led the introduction of innovative and professional programming to meet the evolving needs of students entering an increasingly diverse labour market. As president of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies from 2015-2017, Dr. Brouwer also played a key role in providing national leadership in graduate education.

Dr. Brouwer joined Queen’s after completing a PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Toronto. She holds a B.Sc. in Kinesiology (University of Waterloo) and an M.Sc in Biomechanics (McGill University). She is a professor in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy with cross appointments to the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and the Centre for Neuroscience. Dr. Brouwer maintains a successful research program that focuses on quantifying the biomechanical, neuromuscular and metabolic demands of mobility in healthy aging and stroke.

Dr. Brouwer has served on numerous Senate committees, Council of Ontario Universities’ committees and working groups including the Council on Quality Assurance and the Highly Skilled Workforce Steering Committee. She has also been a member of the U.S. Council of Graduate Studies Advisor group for completion in STEM master’s programs.

“Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane and I extend our thanks to Dr. Brouwer for providing leadership to Smith during this period of transition,” says Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris. “A special thanks also goes to Teri Shearer, Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion), for her support and guidance as Interim Dean of Smith School of Business during the past month.”

Dr. Brouwer is replacing David Saunders who is returning to his role as a faculty member at Smith and is enjoying a well-earned administrative leave (sabbatical) after 16 years as dean.

“Dr. Saunders led the school through tremendous growth including significantly expanding the portfolio of education programs to serve the evolving needs of business, and fostering areas of research and specialized expertise such as analytics and artificial intelligence, entrepreneurship and innovation, social impact and sustainability, leadership and teams, and more,” says Provost Harris. “Under his leadership, Smith established more than 100 strategic international partners and strengthened its reputation as one of the world’s pre-eminent business schools. I would like to thank Dr. Saunders for his significant contributions to Queen’s while heading up the Smith School.”

Smith School of Business at Queen’s is renowned for its excellence, innovation and leadership in business education. From establishing the first undergraduate business degree a century ago to creating groundbreaking programs and courses in emerging areas including artificial intelligence, fintech, analytics, cultural diversity, entrepreneurship, team dynamics, social impact and more, Smith is at the forefront of preparing students for the business marketplace. In addition to its rich tradition of academic and teaching excellence, Smith is known for delivering an outstanding learning and development experience. 

Fall Convocation kicks off with two honorary degrees

  • Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, receives a blanket after Queen's conferred an honorary degree upon him at Fall Convocation.
    Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, receives a blanket after Queen's conferred an honorary degree upon him at Fall Convocation.
  • Patient safety advocate Margaret Murphy of Ireland, centre, accepts an honorary degree from Queen’s University during the second ceremony of Fall Convocation.
    Patient safety advocate Margaret Murphy of Ireland, centre, accepts an honorary degree from Queen’s University. From Left: Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane; Rector Alex Da Silva; Professor and former Director of the Queen’s School of Nursing Jennifer Medves; and Chancellor Jim Leech.
  • Chancellor Jim Leech shakes hands and poses for a photo with a PhD recipient during the first ceremony of Fall Convocation.
    Chancellor Jim Leech shakes hands and poses for a photo with a PhD recipient during the first ceremony of Fall Convocation.
  • A PhD recipient is hooded at Grant Hall as Fall Convocation kicked off on Wednesday, Nov. 13.
    A PhD recipient is hooded at Grant Hall as Fall Convocation kicked off on Wednesday, Nov. 13.
  • Patrick Deane delivers his first convocation speech as principal and vice-chancellor of Queen's University on Tuesday.
    Patrick Deane delivers his first convocation speech as principal and vice-chancellor of Queen's University on Tuesday.

Fall Convocation began at Queen’s University on Wednesday, with the first two of seven ceremonies being held at Grant Hall.

Each of the day’s ceremonies was highlighted by the awarding of an honorary degree. In the morning’s ceremony the recipient was Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, while later in the day world-renowned patient safety advocate Margaret Murphy received her honorary degree.

Fall Convocation continued on Thursday with three more ceremonies.

For the full Fall Convocation schedule, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Celebrating with the Queen’s community

Patrick Deane has been formally installed as the 21st principal and vice-chancellor in a ceremony followed by an open reception for the university.

  • Patrick Deane dons the regalia as principal and vice-chancellor of Queen's as part of the installation ceremony held at Grant Hall.
    Patrick Deane dons the regalia as principal and vice-chancellor of Queen's as part of the installation ceremony held at Grant Hall. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Patrick Deane receives a wampum from Allen Doxtator, Cultural Advisor, as Kanonhsyonne Janice Hill, Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation) looks on.
    Patrick Deane receives a wampum from Allen Doxtator, Cultural Advisor, as Kanonhsyonne Janice Hill, Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation) looks on. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Patrick Deane delivers a speech after being installed as the 21st principal and vice-chancellor of Queen's University on Tuesday, Nov.12.
    Patrick Deane delivers a speech after being installed as the 21st principal and vice-chancellor of Queen's University on Tuesday, Nov.12. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • The Four Directions Women Singers perform an honour song as Chancellor Jim Leech and Rector Alex Da Silva look on.
    The Four Directions Women Singers perform an honour song as Chancellor Jim Leech and Rector Alex Da Silva look on. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Queen's Symphony Orchestra plays at principal's installation
    The Queen's Symphony Orchestra performs at the installation of Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Principal Emeritus Daniel Woolf, third from left, receives an honorary degree during Tuesday's ceremony. From left are Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane, Rector Alex Da Silva, and Chancellor Jim Leech. (University Communications)
    Principal Emeritus Daniel Woolf, third from left, receives an honorary degree during Tuesday's ceremony. From left are Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane, Rector Alex Da Silva, and Chancellor Jim Leech. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • John Borrows receives a blanket from Kanonhsyonne Janice Hill, Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation), after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's. (University Communications)
    John Borrows receives a blanket from Kanonhsyonne Janice Hill, Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation), after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane shakes hands with Queen's faculty members
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane shakes hands with members of the academic procession as they leave Grant Hall. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Patrick Deane speaks with John Borrows
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane speaks with honorary degree recipient John Borrows at the post-ceremony reception in Ban Righ Hall. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Newly-installed Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane takes a moment for a photo with Queen's Bands members.
    Newly-installed Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane takes a moment for a photo with Queen's Bands members. (University Communications / Photo by Bernard Clark)

On a historic day at Queen’s, as Patrick Deane was installed as the 21st principal and vice-chancellor of the university. Over 400 people attended the ceremony on Tuesday, Nov. 12 at Grant Hall, which has been the site of almost every installation since it opened in 1905.

Following the academic procession into the hall, Chancellor Jim Leech delivered an official welcome to the audience. Donald Raymond, Chair of the Board of Trustees, then presented Principal Deane to the chancellor, who led the new principal through the Pledge of Office.

“I, Patrick Deane, promise to uphold the traditions and maintain the principles and purposes of Queen’s University at Kingston as set forth by its founders and affirmed in its charter and by all lawful means to defend its rights and promote its welfare, so help me God,” said Deane, as he took the pledge.

Following the pledge, Principal Deane took part in the robing ceremony, during which he removed his personal academic gown and donned the regalia of the Queen’s principal. He was assisted in this ceremony by representatives from the faculty, staff, student, and alumni populations: David Detomasi, a faculty senator; Catherine Lemmon, a staff senator; Jeremy Mosher, a representative of the Alumni Association; and David Niddam-Dent, a student senator.

To mark the occasion, John Burge, professor in the Dan School of Drama and Music, composed original music. His new composition, “Flourish for the Principal,” was played after the robing.

One of the highlights of every installation ceremony at Queen’s is the address from the new principal, and Principal Deane maintained that tradition.  Now wearing the official robes of the office, he gave a speech outlining his vision for the university and how he aims to work toward it in his role.

“To have the opportunity now to serve Queen’s University as your Principal is a particular honour. Notwithstanding the challenges of our time — indeed, because of them, because of the 'post-truth' ethos and spreading skepticism about expertise and knowledge — I relish the work that lies ahead, and in committing myself to you and the mission of this great Canadian institution, I commit myself again to a world where power consorts not with ignorance and arrogance, but with wisdom, creativity, modesty, and optimism,” Deane said at the conclusion of his address.

The ceremony concluded with a recognition of the significance of this day from representatives from other higher education institutions, who came to the stage and offered formal greetings and congratulations to Principal Deane.

After the formal installation concluded, there were two honorary degree presentations. John Borrows, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria Law School, received a doctor of laws in recognition of his work in the field of Indigenous legal scholarship. And Queen's Principal Emeritus Daniel Woolf received a doctor of laws for his scholarship in the field of history and his leadership in higher education. 

While much of the ceremony followed longstanding Queen’s traditions, Principal Deane put his own stamp on the celebration that came afterward. In the past, the installation ceremony has been accompanied by a small, formal dinner. But Principal Deane opened up the celebration to the entire Queen’s community by holding a reception in Ban Righ Hall that all were welcome to attend.

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