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Flags lowered in memory of retired employee

Flags on campus are lowered in memory of retired employee Lois Kennedy.

She joined Queen’s in 1963 as an assistant manager with Residences. She held that position until she retired in 1991.

Ms. Kennedy was cremated and a private family service will be held. If you would like to make a donation to the Alzheimer’s Society or the Kingston Humane Society in her memory, it would be appreciated by her family.

PPS listening to feedback

In March, Physical Plant Services (PPS) conducted a customer satisfaction survey within the Queen’s community. Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities) John Witjes spoke recently with the Gazette about how PPS is using the feedback it received.

John Witjes, Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities)

Gazette: Who did you survey and what was it all about?

John Witjes: We asked students, staff and faculty what they thought about various aspects of PPS, from customer service to the management of large construction projects. The aim was to help us improve our service to the Queen’s community. We had a phenomenal response with nearly 1000 people taking the time to tell us what they thought about the conditions of grounds, snow removal, building air quality, Fixit, and more.

Gazette: What were some highlights from the results?

JW: We received some very positive feedback about the general conditions of campus grounds and landscaping, as well as snow removal. Given that snow was still fresh on people’s minds in March, we’re particularly happy with that response. The survey also showed high scores for the courtesy and competency of both Fixit administrative staff and our skilled trades staff.

Gazette: What were some of the concerns you received and how do you plan to address them?

JW: Many responses suggested that we focus more on recycling on campus. We already have a robust waste diversion program and we are always working through our Sustainability Office to further improve our success rate in keeping waste out of landfill.

We also had some feedback about safety and security. For example, respondents identified the courtyard between Mackintosh-Corry Hall and Richardson Hall as a place that needed improved illumination.  In response to this, we decided to replace some dated lighting and implement a much better lighting solution in that area. This work will be happening soon.

We also received a range of feedback about cleaning services and I want the campus community to know that we’ve heard those responses. We have very dedicated custodial staff and, as a department, we are always working to provide the best possible service with the resources available to us.

Many of the changes we are making are focused on improving communication with the Queen’s community. We have a new website, we’re on Twitter, and we have a PPS newsfeed that gives up-to-the-minute information on closures and changes.

- John Witjes, Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities)

Gazette: Are there other changes you’re making that address the feedback you received?

JW: Customer service is very important to PPS and we are undertaking a project to update the software we use to manage customer work requests. Our survey showed that people want the ability to track work requests for small repairs and maintenance, and the software update will allow clients to enter requests online and see where they are in the process.  The system will be more efficient and fully electronic and will reduce the amount of data entry and paper use within PPS

Gazette: What are your broader goals for PPS moving forward?

JW: Many of the changes we are making are focused on improving communication with the Queen’s community. We have a new website, we’re on Twitter, and we have a PPS newsfeed that gives up-to-the-minute information on closures and changes.

In addition to these, we have reintroduced our quarterly PPS newsletter which highlights our great staff and the interesting work we’ve been doing across campus.   We’ve also been holding Town Hall meetings during which we’ve been communicating with PPS staff and discussing our renewed Mission, Vision, and Values.

We’re listening and responding to the feedback that we have received. It is our intent to issue the client satisfaction survey annually as we would like to continue our conversation with the campus community so that we can provide the best possible service. 

Operating at a higher level

Contributions to computer-assisted surgery earns Randy Ellis a fellowship with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Queen’s University computing professor Randy Ellis has been named a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The honour recognizes Dr. Ellis’ exceptional engineering achievements and contributions to the engineering profession.

Dr. Randy Ellis (Computing) is one of only seven Canadians to hold a fellowship in both the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

“I am very pleased and honoured to be named a fellow of the ASME,” Dr. Ellis says. “Even though this is an individual honour, I see it as recognition of my research group’s collective efforts over the past 25 years.”

Dr. Ellis, who holds the Queen’s Research Chair in Computer-Assisted Surgery, was nominated for his ongoing work in the field. Over the past 25 years, Dr. Ellis and his research partners have produced more than 300 scientific contributions detailing technical improvements to the technology integrating 3D imaging, surgical planning and intraoperative navigation.

These developments were translated into clinical practice in one of the world’s first computer-assisted surgical suites, which was designed and commissioned by Dr. Ellis at Kingston General Hospital. These breakthroughs can be traced back to a “chance conversation” in the lounge of the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.

 “I was talking with one of my PhD students about how to find faults in robotic joints. We were overheard by someone from the bioengineering side who asked if we could apply that math to human joints, and the research took off from there,” he says.

This is the second notable fellowship Dr. Ellis has received this year. He was previously named a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), making him one of only seven Canadians to hold both distinctions.

Founded in 1880 by a small group of leading industrialists, ASME has grown to include more than 140,000 members in 151 countries.  It serves to promote the art, science and practice of multidisciplinary engineering around the globe. To learn more about ASME, please visit www.asme.org.

SPORTS ROUNDUP: Queen’s takes down No.4 Brock

[Men's Basketball]
Tanner Graham of the Queen's Gaels drives to the basket against the Brock Badgers during Saturday night's game at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Photo by Ian MacAlpine)

Men’s Basketball

The Queen's Gaels men's basketball team (4-1) recorded its biggest victory of the season on Saturday at the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC) by defeating the CIS No. 4 ranked Brock Badgers (3-1) in thrilling fashion, 87-81. Sukhpreet Singh tallied a team-high 18 points, Tanner Graham and Patrick Street added 17 and 16 respectively for the Gaels. On Friday, the Gaels lost 84-71 at home to the No. 9 McMaster Marauders (4-2).

Women’s Basketball

The Queen's Gaels women's basketball team (4-1) had its regular season winning streak snapped at four games on Saturday at the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC), falling to the CIS No. 7 ranked Brock Badgers (3-1) 69-50. Emily Hazlett and Abby Dixon each tallied 13 points for the Gaels. On Friday the Gaels defeated the McMaster Marauders (4-2) 60-53.

Women’s Volleyball

The Queen’s Gaels women’s volleyball team (4-4) battled back after losing the opening set to clinch a 3-1 win against the Guelph Gryphons (3-4) Saturday, 21-25, 25-23, 25-20, 25-19. Shannon Neville was a key player for the Gaels as she recorded 16 kills while picking up 20 digs.

Men’s Volleyball

The Queen's Gaels men's volleyball team (7-1) extended its winning streak to six games on Saturday afternoon at the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC), with a straight sets sweep of the Guelph Gryphons (2-6) 25-17, 25-15, 25-20. Marko Dakic recorded a game-high 12 points while Chris Brunet picked up nine kills, and Mike Tomlinson added five kills and two solo blocks for Queen's.

Women’s Hockey

The Queen's Gaels women’s hockey team (7-1-2-1) suffered their first home loss of the season at the hands of the No. 5 Western Mustangs (8-0-3-0) by a score of 4-1 on Saturday night at the Memorial Centre in Kingston.

Men’s Hockey

The Queen’s Gaels men’s hockey team (8-3-0) fell 4-2 on the road Saturday to the Guelph Gryphons, snapping a three-game winning streak, which included a 4-3 defeat of the No. 8 Western Mustangs (9-3-0) on Thursday.

Nominations invited for Senate position

Nominations are requested for one faculty member, librarian, or archivist to serve on Senate for a three-year term commencing Sept. 1, 2016.

This position is an at-large seat for Senate and is open to a faculty/librarian/archivist from any department at the university.

Nomination forms and information about eligibility and the nomination process are available online or by contacting the University Secretariat at 613-533-6095.

Nominations must be received at the University Secretariat, Suite F300 Mackintosh-Corry Hall, by 4 pm on Friday, Dec. 18.

 

Fit Tip: Rake away to good health

Along with the rainbow of autumn colours comes a lot of yard work, at least raking is good exercise. Doing it yourself is a great way to ‘Get Your 150’.

Here are some safety tips for raking leaves.

- You can burn nearly 300 calories during an hour of raking so make sure to warm-up! Don’t forget to stretch your shoulders, neck, and back. Side bends and knee-to-chest lifts help loosen you up prepare for the raking, bending, and lifting you'll do.

- Stand upright and rake leaves to the side of you, changing side and hand grip every so often. When picking up leaves remember to bend at the knees - not the waist. Never twisting to toss leaves.

- Take a rake break! Remember to rest for 10 to 15 minutes and stay hydrated. If you feel stiff, stretch to release tension.

Power outage for several West Campus locations on Nov. 25

Utilities Kingston has scheduled a power outage on Wednesday, Nov. 25 beginning at 9 am for eight hours that will affect the following buildings:

  • Coastal Engineering Laboratory and GeoEngineering Laboratory
  • Richardson Stadium
  • West Campus Storage

All of the buildings listed above will be closed for the full duration of this planned outage. Staff working out of the buildings should ensure that computers and sensitive equipment are powered off prior to 9 am on Wednesday, November 25.

Questions or concerns regarding this outage should be directed to Utilities Kingston by phone at 613-546-1181 x 2442.

Rankings show Queen's 'diversity of strengths'

A new ranking of university programs by Maclean’s has Queen’s making the top 10 in all 10 categories.

Offered for the first time alongside the magazine’s annual university rankings, Maclean’s ranked universities in 10 different undergraduate programs – biology; business; computer science; education; engineering; environmental science; geology; mathematics; nursing and psychology.

“Queen’s continues to be recognized as one of Canada’s leading universities,” says Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). “To be ranked in the top 10 of all 10 categories speaks to the diversity of strengths that help set Queen’s apart.”

Large research-intensive universities, such as the University of Toronto, the University of British Columbia and McGill University, all had strong results as the indicators with the most weight measured research impact. Despite being a medium-sized university, Queen’s was ranked in the top 10 for all the programs, with the best result being second place for geology.

Jean Hutchinson, Head of the Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, says that the rankings have “validated” the department’s efforts.

“We work very hard in Geology at Queen's both in the classroom and in the field to ensure what we are doing has impact. The incredible dedication and hard work of our faculty, staff, students, and alumni have resulted in a superb learning environment,” Dr. Hutchinson says.

Queen’s Program Rankings

  • Geology – 2
  • Education – 5
  • Business – 6
  • Engineering – 7
  • Psychology – 7
  • Biology – 8
  • Computer Science – 9
  • Nursing – 9
  • Environmental Science – 10
  • Mathematics – 10

Maclean’s program rankings combine five indicators that are assigned a weight to come up with an overall score. Three indicators are based on data provided by Amsterdam-based Elsevier from their Scopus database, one of the most comprehensive compendiums of peer-reviewed literature in the world, with metrics calculated by its SciVal Analytics. The other two indicators are based on a survey of more than 1,200 deans, chairs, and professors at more than 80 schools asking them to list which schools offered the best programs and were doing the best research.

In the Maclean’s 2016 university rankings, released earlier, Queen’s led the way in student satisfaction among Canada’s medical-doctoral universities, while holding its fourth-place overall position within the category.

Talking about who 'We Are'

The Equity Office has recently launched a new blog called We Are with the aim of providing a safe space where the many voices that make up the Queen’s community can have a conversation around equity, diversity and inclusion.

[Equity Blog - We Are]
We Are is a new blog created by the Equity Office at Queen's to have conversations about equity, diversity and inclusion. 

As Equity Advisor Erin Clow explains, the blog will present a wide range of topics related to equity, diversity and inclusion through monthly postings by different contributors, adding that having such conversations is vital for Queen’s as well as the larger community that surrounds it.

“We live in a really diverse community and conversations around equity and inclusion are things that we need to be talking about and thinking about, to ensure that Queen’s is an inclusive community for all of its members,” she says. “The blog is a place where the different contributors can lend their voice to these discussions and where we can hear from a diversity of people on these important topics.”

Dr. Clow says the hope is that more community members will lend their voice to the conversation, offering a diversity of ideas, experiences and perspectives.

One of the first contributors is De-Lawrence Lamptey, a doctoral student from Ghana at the School of Rehabilitation Therapy, who says he got involved with the blog to add to the cultural diversity at the university as well as his own personal experiences.

“Although Queen’s has more room for improvement as far as cultural diversity on campus is concerned, it is worth showcasing the progress that Queen’s has made in providing a welcoming environment to people of diverse backgrounds,” he says. “I also hope that through my piece, people are inspired to face the challenges of life head on. As we grapple with the challenges of life, even if we don’t get our most desirable outcome, every progress we make dealing with the challenges is worth celebrating.” 

For further information about We Are, contact Erin Clow.

Finding beauty in research

  • First Prize: Perfusion of Light – Botterell Hall; Raymond Sturgeon, PhD student, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
    First Prize: Perfusion of Light – Botterell Hall; Raymond Sturgeon, PhD student, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
  • SECOND PRIZE: Santa Fina – Musei Civici, San Gimignano, Italy; Una Roman D’Elia, Department of Art History
    SECOND PRIZE: Santa Fina – Musei Civici, San Gimignano, Italy; Una Roman D’Elia, Department of Art History
  • THIRD PRIZE: Gemini Mirror Reflections – Mauna Kea, Hawaii; Stephane Courteau, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
    THIRD PRIZE: Gemini Mirror Reflections – Mauna Kea, Hawaii; Stephane Courteau, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
  • HONOURABLE MENTION: In Search of Byzantium – Simonopetra Monastery, Mount Athos, Greece; Theodore Christou, Faculty of Education
    HONOURABLE MENTION: In Search of Byzantium – Simonopetra Monastery, Mount Athos, Greece; Theodore Christou, Faculty of Education
  • SHORTLIST: At a Snail’s Pace – Botterell Hall; Alamjeet Kaur Chauhan, Master’s Student, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Science
    SHORTLIST: At a Snail’s Pace – Botterell Hall; Alamjeet Kaur Chauhan, Master’s Student, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Science
  • SHORTLIST: Coded, I Am – Kingston; Stéfy McKnight, Master’s student, Cultural Studies
    SHORTLIST: Coded, I Am – Kingston; Stéfy McKnight, Master’s student, Cultural Studies
  • SHORTLIST: Leaving home – A microscope slide; Eric Y Lian, PhD student, Department of Pathology & Molecular Medicine
    SHORTLIST: Leaving home – A microscope slide; Eric Y Lian, PhD student, Department of Pathology & Molecular Medicine
  • SHORTLIST: Buried Alive – Impala Platinum Mine, Rustenburg, South Africa; Melanie Jansen, Master’s student, Department of Environmental Studies
    SHORTLIST: Buried Alive – Impala Platinum Mine, Rustenburg, South Africa; Melanie Jansen, Master’s student, Department of Environmental Studies
  • SHORTLIST: The Last Tree – Southwest Yukon; Courtenay Jacklin, Student Workplace Experience Program, Department of Geography
    SHORTLIST: The Last Tree – Southwest Yukon; Courtenay Jacklin, Student Workplace Experience Program, Department of Geography
  • SHORTLIST: Borders. What borders? – Apostolos Andreas Monastery, Cyprus; John McGarry, Department of Political Studies
    SHORTLIST: Borders. What borders? – Apostolos Andreas Monastery, Cyprus; John McGarry, Department of Political Studies

There is a massive amount of research going on at Queen’s University and a recent photo contest has helped provide a view of some of the amazing work being accomplished.

This September, the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) launched the first Art of Research photo contest, calling on faculty, staff and students to showcase their research, scholarly and artistic work. Dozens of images were received highlighting a wide range of research from microbiology to the humanities, and locations such as a lab on campus to the Ebola outbreak zone in Africa.

“Our inaugural Art of Research photo contest was truly a great success! We received over 50 entries from students, faculty, and staff that spanned the disciplines, ” says Melinda Knox, co-managing editor of (e)AFFECT, the Queen’s research magazine. “The winning submissions illustrate that research is not just about output: it is also an artistic endeavour and this should be celebrated.”   

A panel of judges selected the first, second, third-prize winners, as well as an honourable mention. Another six photos were included in a shortlist.

Shown are the winners and shortlisted photos. See the Research website for the story behind each photo.

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