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Queen’s student competing for Team Canada at World Para Swimming Championships

Jessica Tinney, a fourth-year kinesiology student, has excelled at balancing academics, work, and athletics.

Jessica Tinney swims in a competitive pool.
Jessica Tinney, a fourth-year kinesiology student at Queen’s, will be competing at the World Para Swimming Championships being hosted June 12-18 in Madeira, Portugal. (Supplied Photo) 

Jessica Tinney, a fourth-year kinesiology student at Queen’s and Athletics and Recreation employee, has qualified for the World Para Swimming Championships. After competing in trials and breaking the Canadian record in the individual medley, she flew from Victoria, BC, back to Kingston the next day to write her final exams.

Tinney has cerebral palsy and staying active has always been important to her and her health. She started swimming when she was eight, as part of her physiotherapy. She enjoyed it so much that swimming became her main form of being active, and she began competing when she was 13.

Her experiences with physiotherapy and cerebral palsy are part of the reason she came to Queen’s to study kinesiology, she explains.

“With my disability, I wanted to learn more about how the body works,” she says. “I’ve always been surrounded by a huge medical support team, so making sense of the language and concepts around me and being able to apply that to my education has been interesting.”

With training and competitions, being a full-time student, an ARC employee and a research assistant, Tinney’s schedule is packed. In order to succeed, she has learned that it is important to focus on one thing at a time.

“I’ve learned you really have to be in the moment. Nothing good ever comes from trying to outline a research paper while you’re at practice,” she says. “Instead, I put all my focus into the one thing that I’m doing for the whole time.”

Tinney says that her four years at Queen’s, and her experiences with professors and peers, has been integral to her success with athletics and academics.

“I’ve been very fortunate with the professors I’ve had that were so accommodating,” she says.

Through the relationships she has built with other students, she has found a great deal of confidence, which she says has undoubtedly translated into her success in the pool.

Looking at the larger sports picture Tinney points out the need for better representation of athletes with disabilities.

“People work just as hard to go to the Paralympics as they do for the Olympics, and I think showing that to the world is important,” she says. “No matter what your background or ability is, if you compete in a sport and you identify as an athlete, you are an athlete first before anything else. A sport really doesn’t change much. I’m swimming in a pool, doing the same events as someone else who is able-bodied.”

Tinney is facing another tight turn around as she balances her academics and athletics. She will be competing in the world championships which are being hosted June 12-18 in Madeira, Portugal. The day after she returns to Canada from the championships she will be back in Kingston to celebrate convocation.

Queen’s joins the Moose Hide Campaign

Advocacy walk held in support of grassroots movement of Indigenous men and boys seeking to end violence against women and children.

  • Elder-In-Residence Allen Doxtator, left, Associate Director of the Office of Indigenous Initiatives Aaron St. Pierre, centre, and Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Mark Green lead Queen's community members on the advocacy walk in support of the Moose Hide Campaign. (Queen's University)
    Elder-In-Residence Allen Doxtator, left, Associate Director of the Office of Indigenous Initiatives Aaron St. Pierre, and Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Mark Green lead Queen's community members on the advocacy walk in support of the Moose Hide Campaign. (Queen's University)
  • Queen's community members walk from Tindall Field to Agnes Benidickson Field in support of the Moose Hide Campaign on Thursday, May 12. (Queen's University)
    Queen's community members walk from Tindall Field to Agnes Benidickson Field in support of the Moose Hide Campaign on Thursday, May 12. (Queen's University)
  • Queen's community members gather to listen to a series of speakers about the importance of the Moose Hide Campaign and the effort to end violence against Indigenous women and children. (Queen's University)
    Queen's community members gather to listen to a series of speakers about the importance of the Moose Hide Campaign and the effort to end violence against Indigenous women and children. (Queen's University)
  • Participants in the Moose Hide Campaign advocacy walk listen to Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Mark Green at Agnes Benidickson Field. (Queen's University)
    Participants in the Moose Hide Campaign advocacy walk listen to Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Mark Green at Agnes Benidickson Field. (Queen's University)

Queen’s University took part in the Moose Hide Campaign on Thursday, May 12, for the first time. The Moose Hide Campaign is a nationwide grassroots movement of Indigenous men and boys seeking to end violence against women and children.

Organized by the Office of Indigenous Initiatives, the Queen’s event brought together supporters who walked from Tindall Field along Union Street and University Avenue to Agnes Benidickson field, where Elders-in-Residence and senior university leaders shared remarks on this important cause.

In a video to promote the event, Chancellor Murray Sinclair, a former Canadian Senator and an Indigenous lawyer and judge who served as chief commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, explains that the Moose Hide Campaign was created because of the importance of addressing issues around violence against women in our society and particularly the overrepresentation of Indigenous women as victims of murder and missing cases.

“The activities that are going on around the country at this time in order to support the campaign are significant and Queen’s commitment to doing this in terms of educating people at the university, but also partnering with other entities within the university and Kingston communities, is important,” Chancellor Sinclair says. “We want to encourage all of you to commit personally to addressing the issue of violence against women and doing what you can to support women who are victims of violence whether it’s domestic or acts of violence in public.”

Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane and Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Mark Green (Rahswahérha), a member of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte, also pledged their support for the Moose Hide Campaign.

On University Avenue, red dresses once again adorned the light posts in support of the REDress Project, after first being displayed on May 5, the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Gender Diverse People

The Moose Hide Campaign is best known for its signature pins – wearable pieces of moose hide designed to spark conversations about reconciliation and decolonization. A limited number of pins, and vegan alternatives, were made available to participants.

Learn more about both the REDress Project exhibit and the Moose Hide Campaign Event on the Office of Indigenous Initiatives website.

Employee Experiences Survey window closes soon

Only a few days remain for faculty and staff to share their views on organizational culture at the university through the Employee Experiences Survey. Scheduled to wrap up on Friday, May 13, the survey will help Queen’s developed a deeper understanding of employees’ current opinions on and experiences in their workplace.

So far, more than 44 per cent of employees have submitted survey responses — all of which will help toward establishing benchmarks to assist the university with building responsive and supportive programming to address employees’ needs. The results will also provide a benchmark to measure progress with respect to strengthening organizational culture, employee wellbeing, and a shared sense of belonging. This work aligns with one of the six primary institutional goals set out in the new Queen’s Strategy.

To encourage high levels of participation, Queen’s has been offering random prize draws for respondents—six who were selected and have received Kingston Downtown Dollars so far. More prizes are still available and, should the response rate exceed 50 per cent by the time the survey closes, an employee summer social will be organized.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to check their work email accounts for an email containing the survey link. It should take roughly 25 minutes to complete, and more information can be found on the Employee Experiences Survey webpage.

Educators and staff honoured as campus Champions for Mental Health

Queen’s University’s Student Mental Health Network is celebrating a second round of Champions for Mental Health – educators and staff members who create supportive environments on campus and in teaching environments by showing compassion, encouraging a sense of belonging, inspiring health-promoting behaviours, and supporting all aspects of student mental well-being.

More than 30 Queen’s educators and staff members, nominated by students as Campus Mental Health Champions, are profiled on the Campus Wellbeing Project’s website, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

The student-led initiative was developed in response to both student feedback and research calling for increased mental health promotion in academics and campus environments.

The Champions for Mental Health webpage includes words from each student nominator about the positive impact the Champion has had on student health and well-being, as well as thoughts from the Champion themselves about supporting student mental health.

In addition, four faculty members who were nominated by students as Champions in both the Winter and Spring 2022 rounds are being honoured as Superstar Champions for Mental Health.

They are:

  • Laurie Gedcke-Kerr - Assistant Professor, Nursing
  • Kate Rowbotham - Professor, Smith School of Business
  • Kyla Tienhaara - Professor, Environmental Studies
  • Dan Vena - Professor, Film & Media

The Champions for Mental Health project supports the Queen's Campus Wellbeing Framework. The framework's goal is to encourage and support an inclusive culture of well-being that inspires and enables all who live, learn, and work at Queen's to thrive.

Sustainable Living Series: The Wolfe Island Passive House Project

This Sustainable Living Series session introduces the Wolfe Island Passive House Project, a local sustainable home built by David Murakami Wood, a professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Surveillance Studies Centre.

On Thursday, May 26 at 2:30 pm, Dr. Murakami Wood will be discussing the problems and prospects for building sustainable housing in Ontario – and your own sustainable home.

Online registration is required for this event. 

All sessions of the Sustainable Living Series are open to all students, staff, faculty, and the public to attend.

For more information or to view past sessions visit the Sustainable Queen’s website.

Free beverages and extended holiday weekends

As part of Mental Health Week (May 2-6), Employee Wellness Services has offered a range of events and initiatives for Queen’s community members.

On Friday, May 6, all staff and faculty members can enjoy a free medium-sized standard brewed coffee or tea, sponsored by the Office of the Principal and Vice-Chancellor, at the following on-campus food outlets:

  • MC2 – MacIntosh-Corry Hall (8 am – 3 pm)
  • Starbucks – Goodes Hall (8 am – 3:30 pm)
  • Tim Horton’s – Queen’s Centre (7:30 am – 3:30 pm)

(If you are enjoying a hot beverage at MC2, you are encouraged to bring your own reusable mug.)  

Extended holiday weekends

Also, this week Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane announced that he is once again extending two upcoming holiday weekends for Queen’s employees as a thanks for the efforts by staff and faculty throughout the pandemic period.

In addition to Monday, May 23, the university will now also be closed on Friday, May 20. The university will also close on Monday, July 4 following the university-wide holiday on Friday, July 1. For employees who already have May 20 or July 4 scheduled as vacation, the days should not be deducted from their vacation allotment. Employees who are required to work on May 20 or July 4 should speak to their managers to find an alternative time to use these designated university holidays.

For the Record – May 5, 2022

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette editor Andrew Carroll.

Renewal, Tenure, Promotion Applications

Under the terms of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s and Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA) for faculty, librarians and archivists, Aug. 15, 2022 is the deadline for regular faculty to apply for renewal, tenure or promotion; librarians and archivists to apply for renewal, continuing appointment or promotion; and adjuncts to apply for promotion. Members must notify their unit head of their intent to apply for renewal, tenure, continuing appointment, or promotion by July 1. Articles that refer to these procedures: Article 24 – Employment Equity; Article 30 – Renewal, Tenure and Promotion for Tenure-Track and Tenured Faculty; Article 31 – Renewal, Continuing Appointment and Promotion for Librarian and Archivist Members; Article 32.6 Promotion for Adjunct Faculty.

University honours Indigenous women and girls lost to violence

Queen’s marks MMIWG2S day of awareness with red dress exhibit and invites campus community to join Moose Hide Campaign advocacy walk.

Red dresses adorn the light poles along University Avenue, with Grant Hall in the background.
Red dresses adorn the light poles along University Avenue to mark the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Gender Diverse People. (Queen's University) 

Red dresses line the Queen’s campus’ main thoroughfare today marking the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Gender Diverse People.

Draped from lamp posts running the length of University Avenue between Union and Stuart streets, the well-known art display by Indigenous artist Jaime Black — called the REDress Project — has been installed by the Queen’s Office of Indigenous Initiatives in recognition of countless lives impacted and lost to violence and systemic neglect.

“The red dress is an increasingly well-known and thought-provoking icon that asks us to remember those lost to violence and to act in ways that advance justice,” says Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation). “I urge all members of the Queen’s community to take a few moments today to pause and think about Indigenous people, particularly women and children, who have been unfairly overlooked, mistreated, and lost to violence in all of its forms.”

Understanding and seeking justice for the disproportionate victimization of Indigenous women and girls were among the calls to action made in the final report by Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which was chaired by the Honourable Murray Sinclair, who now serves as Queen’s Chancellor. 

The red dresses were first shown in 2011 and went on to appear at numerous universities and museums and garner international media coverage. They will be on display from 6 am to 8 pm on Thursday, May 5 and are set to be reinstalled on Thursday, May 12 to coincide with the university’s participation in the Moose Hide Campaign — a nationwide grassroots movement of Indigenous men and boys seeking to end violence against women and children. 

Queen’s Office of Indigenous Initiatives has organized an advocacy walk in support of the cause. Open to all members of the Queen’s and Kingston communities, the event will see supporters walk from Tindall field, down Union Street and University Avenue to Agnes Benidickson field, where senior university leaders and Queen’s Elders-in-Residence will share remarks on this important cause. The walk is scheduled to begin at 3 pm and run until 3:30 pm. Those interested in attending may register for free online.

“Queen’s has, as one of its fundamental values, a responsibility to build a diverse, equitable, inclusive, and anti-racist community for our people, including ongoing efforts to Indigenize and decolonize the academy,” says Mark Green, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). “Events like the Moose Hide Campaign and the REDress installation are impactful ways to start and sustain the important conversations necessary for us to live up to this value.”

The Moose Hide Campaign is best known for its signature pins — wearable pieces of moose hide designed to intrigue and spark conversations about reconciliation and decolonization. A limited number of pins will be made available to participants, and vegan alternatives will be available as well.  

Learn more about both the REDress Project exhibit and the Moose Hide Campaign Event on the Office of Indigenous Initiatives website.

UPDATE: Adobe Acrobat Pro licenses for faculty and staff

UPDATE: Adobe Acrobat Pro DC licenses are now available for individual users. To request your license, submit a request form. For more information about Adobe Acrobat Pro DC, visit the IT Services website.

____________________

IT Services is pleased to announce the purchase of Adobe Acrobat Pro licenses for all faculty and staff of Queen’s University.

What does this mean for faculty and staff?

In late June to early July 2022, faculty and staff will be able to download Adobe Acrobat Pro at no cost to the user. Dates will be finalized closer to launch.

What can I do with Adobe Acrobat Pro?

Adobe Acrobat Pro allows users to view, create, manipulate, print, and manage PDFs. With Adobe Acrobat Pro, users will be able to convert almost any file into a PDF, edit text and images within PDFs, split PDFs into multiple files or combine multiple files into one PDF, request signatures, sign documents, and more.

For the full list of capabilities, visit the Adobe Acrobat features website.

When and how can I download Adobe Acrobat Pro?

IT Services will provide additional communications with instructions for download in June.

Feedback sought on the position of Executive Director, Athletics and Recreation

Recruitment for the next Executive Director, Athletics and Recreation is underway.

Members of the Queen’s University community are invited to submit commentary on the present state and future prospects of Athletics and Recreation, and on specific qualities or skillsets they believe are vital to the role of executive director.

Please email vpdean.sa@queensu.ca before May 13.

More information about the position and the search process is available on the Student Affairs website.

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