Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Campus Community

Show your tricolour pride

University revives Queen’s Day tradition on Oct. 16 by celebrating the day Queen’s received its Royal Charter in 1841.

Queen’s University is reviving a tricolour tradition, but with a modern twist.

Queen’s Day – formerly known as University Day – is Oct. 16 and marks the date in 1841 that Queen’s was granted its Royal Charter from Queen Victoria. Later that year Queen’s established the date as University Day, which, over the next century, was celebrated on campus with a range of events from track and field contests to concerts to fireworks.

A backdrop has been set up on the west wall of Summerhill for a special Queen’s Day photo opportunity. At the same time, a series of Queen’s Day frames and filters have been set up for Facebook and Snapchat. (Communications Staff)

However, the event was halted during the Second World War. It returned briefly in 1991 as the university celebrated its sesquicentennial but ended there. 

Fast-forward now to the university’s 178th anniversary and Oct. 16 will once again be a day to remember – this time as Queen’s Day. In organizing the event the Office of Advancement has partnered with the Alma Mater Society (AMS), to set up a program calling on the Queen’s community to show off their tricolour, with a particular emphasis on social media.

Throughout the day, Queen’s students, alumni, faculty, and staff, are being encouraged to take pictures of themselves and their friends and tag the Queen’s Alumni social media accounts – Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter – for a chance to win a prize pack. For those on campus, a backdrop will be set up on the west wall of Summerhill for a special Queen’s Day photo opportunity. At the same time, a series of Queen’s Day frames and filters have been set up for Facebook and Snapchat.

“There is a great sense of pride within the Queen’s community – students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane. “Queen’s has a very rich history of community engagement and reviving this celebration in the 21st century shows the evolution of our institution and the promise of a bright future.  I hope those who support Queen’s will join me in wearing the tricolor.”

Also on Queen’s Day, staff, faculty, and students wearing tricolour on campus will receive a 50 per cent discount on hot beverages (coffee, tea, hot chocolate) with their reusable mug in any size at Starbucks in Goodes Hall, Starbucks in Mitchell Hall, Goodes Café, The Library Café, Mac Corry, The Lazy Scholar, Location 21, Gord’s Fresh Café, Student Street (West Campus), Tim Hortons in the Queen's Centre, Tim Hortons in the JDUC, and Tim Hortons in the Biosciences building.

In conversation with Patrick Deane

[Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane]

It’s been just over 90 days since Patrick Deane took on the role of Principal and Vice-Chancellor at Queen’s. The Gazette recently took some time to chat with him about his experience at Queen’s in the role so far, his open letter, and plans for conducting a conversation with the Queen’s community about the issues we are facing and the university’s future.

You’ve been in the role now for just over three months, can you tell us a bit about what you’ve been doing and some of your thoughts about the role so far?

CONVERSATION SERIES
Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane is hosting a series of conversations, with the first one scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 15 starting at noon in Wallace Hall. Other conversation events are scheduled for Nov. 11, Jan. 14, and Feb. 27.
For more details visit the Principal and Vice-Chancellor's website.

What I’ve done most in that time has been to get to know people and to reacquaint myself with the institution. Although I know the place, I’ve been away a long time so there’s a lot to learn. I’ve really devoted myself to learning as much as I can about the state of the institution and meeting as many people as I could feasibly meet to get up to speed. Although it’s difficult to say what I’ve learned at this point, it would be true to say that it’s obvious to me that there is an appetite to have the conversation about some very fundamental questions for the university and its future and mission.

Why are you conducting the conversation?

Well, I think it’s very easy for institutions to get out of the habit of reflecting upon the values that they stand for and the enterprise they’re committed to, and by that I don’t mean the short-term goals of graduating ‘x’ number of students. That’s an important dimension of the work, but the overall mission is a very fundamental question. Institutions are very devoted to answering to the needs of government and immediate needs and challenges of students that they become caught up in the “day-to-day” and lose their attention to the bigger questions. I think it’s very difficult to make wise decisions on the day-to-day issues unless you are very, very clear on the long-term, value-related questions that I’m wishing to look at in the conversation.

Why are you calling this process a ‘conversation’?

Because it’s intended to be genuinely open. I have no pre-imagined endpoint and it needs to be a conversation because I don’t want the subjects of discussion and conclusions reached to be driven by questions of seniority, hierarchy, and so on. I also think that conversation is a fundamental aspect to the operation of universities. It may seem a slightly unusual thing to do but, if you think about it, conversation lies at the base of learning in all its manifestations. I’m entering into this in the same spirit one should enter into the whole process of learning: asking questions, exploring solutions and challenges, and learning from others what might be the best way forward.

What do you hope will come from the conversation?

A renewed sense of purpose within the university; a new and energetic reimagining of what our greater purpose is and then after we’ve achieved that insight, a reimagining of everything we do in light of that. So, what we do whether it’s in the classroom or in the research arena, or even in the way in which we conduct ourselves in our day-to-day work amongst staff of the university, that everyone will be able to reconceptualize what they do in the light of those fundamental questions that we’ve discussed.

Tell me about the process. How long will it take and will you report back on what’s happening?

Conversation itself is open-ended and must continue, but for this particular purpose I’m imagining that the first phase will take us to the end of the winter term, with some interim reporting back around the end of the year. Then, in the spring, I will share a more integrated and comprehensive assessment of where the conversation has led and what would seem to be the next appropriate steps.

How can people participate in the conversation?

In any number of ways. There are formal occasions that they can make use of to come and be part of the discussion in the forums or town-hall type meetings (Note: the first is happening October 15). I will be around campus in many departments and faculty meetings and will be extending the conversation in those settings. There is, of course, the online opportunity to write to me and make submissions through that means and people can simply contact me directly. This is an important conversation and I’m keen to maximize the opportunities for people to access it.

How do you enjoy living back in Kingston?

It’s a great pleasure being back. I very much enjoyed my five years here (2005-2010) and obviously formed a very close attachment to Queen’s so it is wonderful to be back and enjoying both the university and the city of Kingston and the broader region. The beauty of this return is that I feel that I’ve settled back very quickly to this world and to the concerns and issues that are important here so in some ways, this has been exactly what you wish for when you make a move of this sort. There are new challenges, I feel refreshed, but at the same time I feel that because I know people and the place I have certain tools that can help me get up to speed much more quickly and be effective.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

I’m hugely optimistic about the university and where it could be going. What animates my excitement in the work I do is a very serious commitment to students and to the advancement of knowledge and discovery. So, this whole process, which is getting down to the fundamentals of what the university is here to do and reaffirming those big human imperatives that inform the university’s mission, is very exciting.

Notification requirement in Sexual Violence Policy suspended pending further consultation

Public meetings to discuss the implementation of the policy are planned for Oct. 17 and Oct. 23.

Changes to the Policy on Sexual Violence Involving Queen’s Students were introduced in May 2019, in an effort to better ensure that any student who experiences sexual violence is offered full university support.  For this reason, the policy dictates that employees (excepting health care providers) who receive a disclosure of sexual violence from a student must notify Queen’s Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Coodinator (SVPRC).

To further ensure that all students who disclose an incident of sexual violence to a university employee receive trained guidance and are made aware of the full range of supports available to them, the university established a requirement for faculty and staff to provide the SVPRC with the name and email address of the student who disclosed.  The intent of this requirement was to better support students; however, the university has received feedback from many concerned employees and students who fear that the requirement may have the unintended effect of further traumatizing the student, and may ultimately dissuade students from disclosing at all.

As the safety of students was the driving impetus behind the university’s decision, the university considers it prudent to suspend the requirement to provide the student’s name and email to the SVPRC while further community consultation is conducted.  Until this additional consultation has been completed, Queen’s employees should continue to notify the SVPRC that they have received a disclosure, but should not provide identifying information unless the student has provided their explicit consent to do so.  Employees who receive a disclosure are expected to inform the student of the supports available to them through the SVPRC, and are encouraged to ask the student to consider allowing their contact information to be shared so that proactive outreach can be initiated.  The balance of the policy remains in force.

Public meetings to discuss the implementation of the policy are planned for Thursday, Oct. 17 from 5-6 pm, and Wednesday, Oct. 23 from 10-11 am.  Both meetings will be held in Robert Sutherland Hall, Rm. 202.

Questions can be directed to Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion), Teri Shearer, at provost@queensu.ca.

Principal’s statement concerning racist note

This morning, a racist, homophobic, and threatening poster was discovered attached to the door of a common room in one of our student residence buildings. There is no place at Queen’s for racism, hatred, or threats of violence as expressed in this poster.

I will not give voice to the message by repeating any of the language it contained. Suffice it to say it was a cowardly violation of human rights and the dignity of individuals, and sought to intimidate and foster hate toward, and fear in, Indigenous and Queer identified members of our Queen’s family.

The note was immediately removed after it was discovered, police were notified, and staff moved quickly to mobilize supports to assist students in the residence impacted by this event.

Queen’s has worked hard – and continues to work hard – to support and implement a wide array of initiatives aimed at increasing diversity and inclusion and combatting racist hatred. Clearly there is more work to be done.

I know our entire campus and Kingston community will be saddened and deeply hurt to learn of this. Our community is one that strives to create a diverse, safe and inclusive environment for all students, faculty and staff.

This incident is being actively investigated. Our students were notified and anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact Campus Security and Emergency Services (613-533-6111) or Kingston Police (613-549-4660).

I would remind everyone that if you feel affected by this incident and require support, please do not hesitate to reach out to the support services available on campus, or the multi-faith chaplain. Additional resources after hours and over the weekend for students include Empower Me,  Good2Talk, and Hope for Wellness Helpline.

– Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane

For the Record, Oct. 10, 2019

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

The next issue of For the Record will be published Thursday, Oct. 24. The deadline for submitting information is Tuesday, Oct. 22. For the Record is published bi-weekly throughout the academic year and monthly during the summer.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette Editor Andrew Carroll.

Selection committee appointed for the Head, Department of English Language and Literature

Chris Bongie’s term as acting head of the Department of English Language and Literature is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has appointed a Selection Committee to advise him on the appointment of the next Head. The Selection Committee has the following membership:

  • Dr. Brooke Cameron, Assistant Professor, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Dr. Heather MacFarlane, Assistant Professor, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Dr. Robert May, Continuing Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Dr. Kristin Moriah, Assistant Professor, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Dr. Laura Murray, Professor, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Dr. Daryn Lehoux, Cognate Faculty, Professor, Department of Classics
  • Levorka Fabek-Fischer, Graduate Assistant, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Skylar Kovacs, Graduate Student, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Samantha Stellato, Undergraduate Student, Department of English Language and Literature
  • Dr. Betsy Donald, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Dr. Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science, Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, I invite your comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of English Language and Literature by Oct. 15, 2019. I also ask you to submit names of possible candidates for the headship. Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca).

All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the Department and the Committee to ascertain the Department’s views on the qualities of a Head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the Department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of Geography and Planning

Dr. Paul Treitz’s term as acting head of the Department of Geography and Planning is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has appointed a selection committee to advise him on the appointment of the next Head. The Selection Committee has the following membership:

  • Dr. Ajay Agarwal, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Dr. Ryan Danby, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Dr. Beverly Mullings, Professor, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Dr. Carolyn Prouse, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Dr. Laura Thomson, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Dr. Luc Martin, Cognate Faculty, Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology & Health Studies
  • Kathy Hoover, Departmental Manager, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Jackie Hung, Graduate Student, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Malavika Murali, Undergraduate Student, Department of Geography and Planning
  • Dr. James Reynolds, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Dr. Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science, Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, I invite your comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Geography and Planning by Nov. 1, 2019. I also ask you to submit names of possible candidates for the headship. Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca).

All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making. The selection committee will begin meeting early in January.

At the request of either the Department members or the Committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a Head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the Department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of Chemistry

Richard Oleschuk‘s term as acting head of the Department of Chemistry is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has appointed a Selection Committee to advise him on the appointment of the next Head. The Selection Committee has the following membership:

  • Dr. Stephen Brown, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry
  • Dr. Cathy Crudden, Professor, Department of Chemistry
  • Dr. Philip Jessop, Professor, Department of Chemistry
  • Dr. Guojun Liu, Professor, Department of Chemistry Dr. David Zechel, Professor, Department of Chemistry
  • Dr. Georgia Fotopoulos, Cognate Faculty, Professor, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering
  • Heather Drouillard, Departmental Manager, Department of Chemistry
  • Jevon Marsh, Graduate Student, Department of Chemistry
  • Emily Steele, Undergraduate Student, Department of Chemistry
  • Dr. James Reynolds, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Dr. Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, I invite your comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Chemistry by Oct. 18, 2019. I also ask you to submit names of possible candidates for the Headship.

Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca). All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making. At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the Department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for the Head Department of Psychology

Dr. Wendy Craig’s term as head of the Department of Psychology is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has appointed a Selection Committee to advise him on the appointment of the next head.

The Selection Committee has the following membership:

  • Dr. Monica Castelhano, Associate Professor,
  • Dr. Tom Hollenstein, Associate Professor
  • Dr. Valerie Kuhlmeier, Professor,
  • Dr. Tara MacDonald, Associate Professor
  • Dr. Caroline Pukall, Professor
  • Dr. Jean Côté, Cognate Faculty, Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Theresa Brennan, Departmental Manager
  • Alison Crawford, Graduate Student
  • Stephanie Manuel, Undergraduate Student
  • Dr. James Reynolds, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Dr. Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Psychology are invited by Oct. 15, 2019. Please also submit names of possible candidates for the headship.

Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca). All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the Department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for the Director, School of Religion

Pamela Dickey Young’s term as interim director of the School of Religion is scheduled to end on June 30, 2020. Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris has appointed a Selection Committee to advise him on the appointment of the next director.

The Selection Committee has the following membership:

  • Dr. Amarnath Amarasingam, Assistant Professor, School of Religion
  • Dr. Dustin Atlas, Assistant Professor, School of Religion
  • Dr. Sharday Mosurinjohn, Assistant Professor, School of Religion
  • Dr. Tracy Trothen, Professor, School of Religion
  • Dr. Shobhana Xavier, Assistant Professor, School of Religion
  • Dr. Adnan Husain, Cognate Faculty, Associate Professor, History
  • Mary Smida, Departmental Administrator, School of Religion
  • Samuel Maclennan, Graduate Student, School of Religion
  • Colleen Cooper, Undergraduate Student, School of Religion
  • Dr. Betsy Donald, Associate Dean (School of Graduate Studies)
  • Dr. Gordon E. Smith (Chair), Vice-Dean (Faculty Relations), Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Danielle Gugler (Secretary), Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston,  comments on the present state and future prospects of the School of Religion are invited by Oct. 15, 2019. Please also submit names of possible candidates for the directorship.

Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Danielle Gugler (danielle.gugler@queensu.ca). All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the school members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the school and the committee to ascertain the school’s views on the qualities of a director. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the School for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES

Job Title: Health Care Assistant
Department: Integrated Wellness Services
Competition: J0619-0935
Successful Candidate: Nisha Ahuja

Job Title: Refrigeration Mechanic
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J0619-0159
Successful Candidate: Aaron Naphan

Job Title: Systems Developer (USW Local 2010)
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: J0519-0134
Successful Candidate: Nikolas Jackson (Information Technology Services)

Job Title: Director of Finance
Department: Faculy of Law
Competition: J0119-0617
Successful Candidate: Helen Kobusinge

Job Title: Research Facilitator (USW Local 2010)
Department: University Research Services
Competition: J0719-0894
Successful Candidate: Magda Monreal

Job Title: Experiential Learning Projects Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Career Services
Competition: J0619-0549
Successful Candidate: Lilith Wyatt

Job Title: Manager, Business Operations and Analysis
Department: Office of the University Registrar (Student Awards)
Competition: J0619-0089
Successful Candidate: Dustin Reid (Student Awards)

Job Title: Emergency Report Centre Operator
Department: Campus Security and Emergency Services
Competition: J0719-0571
Successful Candidate: Elizabeth Wentz, Ehis McEwen

Job Title: Groundskeeper (CUPE 229)
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J0719-0528
Successful Candidate: Mark Duttle (Athletics & Recreation), James Bailey (Physical Plant Services)

Job Title: Trade Helper (CUPE 229)
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J0719-0162
Successful Candidate: Kevin Fletcher (Residences)

Job Title: Caretaker (CUPE 229)
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J0819-0544
Successful Candidate: Jordan Lalonde

Job Title: Caretaker (CUPE 229)
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J0619-0154
Successful Candidate: Sean Ashton

Job Title: Financial Analyst (USW Local 2010)
Department: Financial Services
Competition: J0719-0988
Successful Candidate: Margaret Somerville

Job Title: Professional Programs Graduate Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Competition: J0619-0925
Successful Candidate: Emily Cornfield (School of Rehabilitation Therapy)

Job Title: Departmental Assistant
Department: Centre for Advanced Computing
Competition: J0719-1032
Successful Candidate: Elise Degen (Centre for Advanced Computing)

Job Title: Administrative Assistant to Associate Deans and Directors
Department: Dean's Office, Faculty of Arts and Science
Competition: J0719-0342
Successful Candidate: Kim Belefontaine (Dean’s Office, Faculty of Arts and Science)

Job Title: Health Care Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Integrated Wellness Services
Competition: J0619-0934
Successful Candidate: Sherry Reedy

Finding alternatives to gentian violet

[EngSoc executive members]
Engineering Society of Queen’s University (EngSoc) President Delaney Benoit, left, and EngSoc Orientation Chair Kennedy Whitfield, right, worked as part of a team that sought an alternative to gentian violet. (University Communications)

When Health Canada issued a safety alert on June 12 warning of potential cancer risks associated with exposure to gentian violet, Queen’s Engineering Society executive members started to search for a comparable but safe alternative in time for orientation week, then just 10 weeks away.

“Students love tradition, it’s one of the big pillars of our school,” says Engineering Society of Queen’s University (EngSoc) President Delaney Benoit. “I think there was an immediate concern that we weren’t going to be able to purple at all, that the tradition was going to be lost.”

[Purple people FRECs
During Orientation Week 2019, student leaders in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science used ProAiir Hybrid Face and Body FX Paint, left, as a safe alternative to gentian violet, right, used in previous years. 

Though a somewhat modern practice in the history of Queen’s engineering, the all-over skin purpling of some second-year students in character as orientation week leaders – FRECs – has been a part of the orientation since at least the early 1990s. Orientation leaders dunked themselves in kiddie pools filled with warm water fortified with the purple dye and medical antiseptic, gentian violet, to achieve the startling purple skin tone so fondly associated with engineering orientation at Queen’s. It came as a surprise that gentian violet, with its long history as a mild and medically-approved antiseptic, antifungal, and anti-parasitic agent, could pose unforeseen risks. 

Benoit, along with EngSoc Vice-President (Student Affairs) Zaid Kasim, and EngSoc Orientation Chair Kennedy Whitfield, started the search for a safe alternative. Benoit sought clarification on the risks for topical application from Health Canada, a process that took weeks. They met with Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Kevin Deluzio on the matter and fielded several inquiries and requests for comment from media. 

“We had to start making plans without actually knowing where we stood on the warning,” says Benoit. “We started researching alternatives right away: different things we could use, different approaches we could take.”

By the time Health Canada was able to respond to Benoit’s request for clarification (their advice was to entirely avoid using gentian violet on skin) Benoit, Kasim, and Whitfield had already tried several alternatives including food colouring, and some other food-related products they knew were approved for human consumption.

“Then we started looking at different types of face and body paints, cosplay and theatrical makeup, which is how we found ProAiir,” says Whitfield.

Finding a safe alternative

ProAiir Hybrid Face and Body FX Paint is billed by its manufacturer, Tennessee-based ShowOffs Body Art LLC, as a professional-grade body FX makeup. The company provided a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for their makeup that does not include gentian violet or any of its variants among the composition information. The makeup resists water and sweat, can be sprayed on or applied with a sponge, lasts about three days on the skin, but comes off easily and completely with soap or baby oil.

At home in Calgary, Whitfield was able to find a sample of ProAiir makeup in a retail store. Whitfield, Benoit, and Kasim tested it and said they were encouraged by the results. However, time was running short and finding the funds to pay for enough ProAiir to purple all the FRECs in time for Orientation Week was proving to be a barrier. Benoit says ProAiir costs about 10 times that of similar quantities of gentian violet but the supplier stepped up and offered a 50 per cent volume discount on the order. The EngSoc crew were able to secure further one-time support funding from the Queen’s Alma Mater Society (AMS) Sustainability Action Fund. The ProAiir shipment cleared customs and arrived in Kingston with just a few days to spare.

Benoit and Whitfield demonstrated purpling with ProAiir on a FREC committee member, and Whitfield wrote and distributed among orientation leaders a document about how best to apply it with sponges and special spray bottles. Orientation Week, complete with its purple people, was a success.

“We were really excited by how it worked out,” says Whitfield. “The colour was a little bit different than gentian but that turned out to be helpful because we would have been able to tell if anyone had showed up to Orientation Week wearing gentian violet. We let the leaders know, ‘If you guys show up wearing gentian violet, you will be de-leadered.’ We found that no one went against that. We expected that one or two would try, but ProAiir worked so well, I think that people were happy.”

Looking for a long-term answer

Still, the story isn’t quite over. It remains to be determined if ProAiir is the long-term purple-peopleing  answer. For now, the faculty is taking a stance prohibiting people who have purpled, with any substance, from entering faculty buildings out of concern for damage to the facilities (similar to the policy adopted by Residences). This is of particular interest during next week’s Homecoming celebration.

The next challenge for the EngSoc executive to navigate is how to purple jackets in time for the end of final exams in December. Benoit says she is collaborating with representatives of Campus Equipment Outfitters, Queen’s University Residences, Queen’s Environmental Health and Safety, EngSoc General Manager Jay Young, FEAS Operations and Facilities Manager Simon Smith, and others to determine what if any alternative to gentian violet might be useful for dyeing jackets.

“The purple dyes that were recommended to us by leather suppliers all have gentian in them,” says Benoit. “We don’t know yet whether or not it’s safe to use gentian to dye jackets, so we are looking for an agent that gets rid of the gentian issue altogether. We are hoping to find a practical solution in the next couple of weeks.

“I think so far, though, that there was no spirit lost during Orientation Week because gentian violet wasn’t there. It had the exact same energy as in previous years, if not more, because we found something that worked so well, and that actually made the FRECs lives a bit easier in terms of application and de-purpling. ProAiir was just so much easier to use.” 

Supporting Indigenous student wellness

Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre staff member transitions to new cultural counsellor role.

[Lisa Doxtator]
Lisa Doxtator is the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre’s first cultural counsellor, a position that has been fully integrated with Queen’s Student Wellness Services (SWS). (Photo by Bernard Clark/University Communications)

Lisa Doxtator has been part of the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre community since 2015, recruiting students to Queen’s, and leading student-led community outreach programs. Earlier this year, she became the centre’s first cultural counsellor, a position that has been fully integrated with Queen’s Student Wellness Services (SWS).

Doxtator provides individual and group counselling and therapy, and offers wellness and cultural programming to Indigenous students. New programs include The Sacred Fire, an event that gives students, faculty and staff the opportunity to learn about Indigenous sacred medicines, the fire, and smudging.

'Building a sense of community'

“Building a sense of community for the Indigenous students has been my priority, because Indigenous students need to feel a sense of safety and security, and to see themselves reflected in these safe spaces,” she says. “It’s important for students to have a place where they can open up about their personal experiences as Indigenous students on campus and feel heard, validated and supported.”

Doxtator is a member of the Bear Clan from the Oneida Nation of the Thames. She has a background in social work, with experience in trauma and recovery counselling, and is a registered mental health professional. Doxtator positions her therapeutic technique within an Indigenous worldview that acknowledges and validates Indigenous students’ experiences and histories.

“I am enjoying getting to know the Indigenous students and to hear how much it means to them that there is a cultural counsellor who can meet with them at Four Directions,” she says. “I have seen the resilience of Indigenous students at Queen’s, and how they continue to move forward to be the best they can be, regardless of the barriers they encounter.”

Connecting Indigenous students to health professionals

As a regulated health professional, Doxtator is a part of the Student Wellness Services integrated health team; which is composed of doctors, nurses, psychiatrists, occupational therapists, and other counsellors with specific areas of expertise. Through the collaboration with SWS, she is able to refer and connect Indigenous students to these health professionals when needed. In addition, she can liaise with Accessibility Services, and Health Promotion when supporting students. Simply stated, her role is central to connecting Indigenous students with other services on campus.

“I am very proud of the work that Lisa has done in such a short time in the role. She is working towards building a strong community of Indigenous students at Four Directions and creating engaging programming for them to make time for their well-being,” says Kandice Baptiste, Director of Four Directions. “The collaboration with SWS has been very exciting and I look forward to continuing to work together to support the needs of Indigenous students at Queen’s.”

In the fall, Doxtator will be starting a weekly Mental Health Sharing Circle. This group will provide education and awareness about mental health issues that are relevant to Indigenous students, and give participants the chance to share their own experiences. In addition, she will be co-facilitating a counselling group with SWS entitled ‘Managing Powerful Emotions’.

Through her integrated position, Doxtator is able to increase the accessibility of wellness services at Four Directions, and implement her knowledge and awareness of the needs of Indigenous students to the services offered at SWS.

“Lisa has, in her short time in this role, brought so much knowledge of Indigeneity to our team of counsellors, and as such has been instrumental in building capacity. She has a warm quality about her that allows for the quick establishment of trust, both between her and the students, as well as with her colleagues,” says Rina Gupta, Director of Counselling Services. “The role she plays is so instrumental in supporting indigenous students in a way that allows them to feel understood, supported, and valued. Lisa sometimes plays a vital role in helping students feel more comfortable accessing the wider range of health services at Queen’s that many have held back from accessing previously. I am so happy to have Lisa on our team, and could not imagine it any other way.”

To learn more about programs and services, visit the SWS and Four Directions websites.

To set up a meeting with Lisa Doxtator, contact her at 613-533-6000 ext. 77986, or by email at lmd9@queensu.ca.

Sexual Violence Policy open meeting

Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion) Teri Shearer is hosting two open meetings to discuss the Policy on Sexual Violence Involving Queen’s University Students.  

Meetings will be held in Robert Sutherland Hall, Rm. 202 on:

  • Thursday, Oct. 17, 5-6 pm
  • Wednesday, Oct. 23, 10-11 am

All members of the Queen’s community are welcome to attend or to submit comments for consideration to provost@queensu.ca .  

Gaels run for the cure

Queen's student-athletes raise more than $25,000 in support of breast cancer research, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and care.

[Gaels athletes at 2019 CIBC Run for the Cure]
Queen's Gaels athletes, including the men's rugby team, raised close to $26,000 in the 28th annual CIBC Run for the Cure in Kingston, on Sunday, Oct. 6. (Supplied Photo)

Queen’s Gaels athletes dawned pink as they participated in the 28th annual CIBC Run for the Cure in Kingston, on Sunday, Oct. 6. 

Queen's varsity athletes raised $5,539.11, but the men’s rugby team took the challenge to another level contributing a whopping $20,275.40 total representing an outstanding year in fundraising.  On Sunday, Queen’s Gaels athletes dawned pink as they participated in the 28th annual CIBC Run for the Cure in Kingston. 

The Gaels men's rugby team has almost made the event their own with their diligent efforts in fundraising. In 2018, the team raised an all-time high total of $30,437.62. 

MAKING AN IMPACT ON AND OFF THE FIELD

The annual event began in 1992 when the Canadian Cancer Society and CIBC partnered with communities across Canada in order to raise money for breast cancer research. Since its inception the event has raised over $430 million and has expanded to 56 communities around the country.

The funds raised by Gaels athletes be invested into breast cancer research, prevention, diagnosis and treatment and care through the Canadian Cancer Society. 

Donations and support for the Canadian Cancer Society are still welcome.

Support Queen’s varsity athletes’ total.

Support the men’s rugby total.

Robert Sutherland Hall first floor construction project begins

The first floor of Robert Sutherland Hall will be restricted to authorized contractors only between Oct. 7 and Nov. 1 (inclusive) while construction is underway in a number of rooms. During renovations, there will be temporary restriction on general access as safe access to rooms, hallways and alternate exits may be impeded.

Timetabled classes are being moved from rooms 137 and 145 to allow the contractor to carry out necessary work and to minimize the impact of the noise and dust.

The Master of Industrial Relations (MIR) Office will provide updated class locations directly to all students and faculty affected by the temporary closure of the first floor.

Questions concerning construction activities should be directed to Fixit at fixit@queensu.ca.  Health and safety queries related to this activity should be directed to the Department of Environmental Health & Safety at safety@queensu.ca.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Campus Community