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Don’t let stress get out of control

Queen’s University provides a wide range of supports and services to help students prepare, be ready, and stay healthy throughout exam period.

It’s exam time at Queen’s and the university offers a wide range of support resources and services to help students prepare, be ready, and stay healthy.

Exam stress is a reality but learning how to manage it, and how to avoid long-term stress, is vitally important. Raising awareness of the importance of mental health and resilience on campus is a focus throughout the academic year, and especially during the exam period.

Student Support
Students looking to improve learning and studying strategies or academic stress coping skills can book a Learning Strategies advising appointment at queensu.mywconline.com.

For some students, self-care may not be enough. Anyone feeling overwhelmed should seek out support through resources such as Counselling Services at Student Wellness Services, the Office of the University Chaplain, the AMS Peer Support Centre, the SGPS Student Advisor Program, and Student Academic Success Services.

Students can also access support from the Queen’s University International Centre and Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, and counsellors based in Residences and most Faculties and Schools.
 

“I have been here for a number of years and we’ve seen mental health really come to the forefront,” says Beth Blackett, Health Promotion Coordinator at Student Wellness Services. “People talk about it which is really great, but we also need to ask ‘how do we take the next step’ and work to get everyone to a point where they can achieve optimal health and wellness. We want students to thrive, not just survive, even during exams.”

Throughout the year there are workshops aimed at stress management, mindfulness and mental and physical wellness. During exams, there is a heightened level of support and services available.

For students who are feeling overwhelmed and needing one-on-one support, counselling is available through appointments at Counselling Services. Students in crisis can stop by without a booked appointment on the second floor of the LaSalle Building, at 146 Stuart St.

At the same time, Ms. Blackett adds, there is a growing emphasis on self-care and mindfulness.

Once again the Queen’s University Be Well team of peer health educators will be running a self-care exam challenge using social media, while Student Academic Success Services (SASS) has an excellent time management program for all students in the Exam Study Schedule.

The strength of the schedule is its simplicity. In a high-tech world, sometimes the best way to get organized is by writing it all down on paper, and that includes time for breaks and eating properly.

Picking up on this success, Health Promotion has created a new exam self-care plan modeled on the Exam Study Schedule.

“SASS does a really great job of helping students develop their exam study schedule so the idea is that you would build self-care into your exam schedule rather than thinking ‘I’ll get healthy when I’m done studying’,” Ms. Blackett says. “We know you are not effective when you are studying for 12-hours straight! It’s important to plan times to get up, get moving and try to bring in an element of health and wellness.”

Students can book a one-one-one appointment with professional staff to develop their own self-care plan for the exam period. 

Also new this year is a pilot project involving biofeedback brain-sensing headbands that can help users get the most out of their meditation sessions.

“This device gives you feedback when you are practicing mindfulness meditation,” she explains, adding that Peer Health Outreach Coordinator Schuyler Schmidt is available for support. “You meditate for a couple of minutes and you get some feedback about whether you’re actually focusing your attention and helps you connect back in with yourself.”

Information and booking for these appointments is available at the Student Wellness Services website.

Counselling Contacts

Students who wish to make an appointment with Counselling Services can call 613-533-6000, ext. 78264, or:

•Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science (613-533-3447)
•Faculty of Education (613-533-2334)
•School of Graduate Studies (613-533-2136)
•Smith School of Business (via Commerce Portal)
•Residence Counsellors (613-533-6000, ext. 78330 or 78034)
•School of Medicine (613-533-6000, ext. 78264).

Another resource available for students is Good 2 Talk, a 24/7/365 post-secondary student helpline which offers free, professional, and anonymous support. Students can call 1-866-925-5454 to talk about any stressful issues they might be experiencing.

A delicious special delivery

Principal Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon-Woolf hand out 1,500 cookies at Queen's University libraries as students prepare for final exams.

  • [Principal Daniel Woolf takes a selfie with student at Douglas Library]
    A student takes a selfie with Principal Daniel Woolf as he hands out cookies at Douglas Library for an eighth year in a row.
  • [Julie Gordon-Woolf hands out cookies at Stauffer Library]
    Principal Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon-Woolf visited each of the Queen's University libraries as they handed out 1,500 sugar cookies on Sunday.
  • [Principal Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon-Woolf hand out cookies at Stauffer Library]
    Students take a break to enjoy a sweet treat as Principal Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon Woolf handed out 1,500 cookies at Queen's University libraries on Sunday, April 8.
  • [Principal Daniel Woolf hands out cookies Stauffer Library]
    For many Queen's students, receiving a cookie from Principal Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon-Woolf is a bit of a nice surprise, while others eagerly await the annual tradition.
  • [Julie Gordon-Woolf hands out cookies at Douglas Library]
    With the aim of giving students a bit of a break during the pre-exam study period, Julie Gordon-Woolf hands out sugar cookies at Douglas Library.
  • [Principal Daniel Woolf hands out cookies at Stauffer Library]
    Principal Daniel Woolf hands out cookies at Stauffer Library on Sunday, April 8. The event marked the eighth year the principal and his wife have delivered a sweet treat to students as they prepare for final exams.

Principal Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon-Woolf helped spread some cheer on campus on Sunday with their annual cookie drop as students prepare for their final exams.

A highly-anticipated tradition during the spring pre-exam study period, the Woolfs handed out 1,500 sugar cookies to students at Queen's University’s libraries, including the Education Library, Bracken Health Sciences Library, Lederman Law Library, Douglas Library and Stauffer Library.

This marked the eighth year for the cookie drop.

The cookies were sponsored by the Principal’s Office, and the Queen's Student Alumni Association helped bag the treats.

Educational Downlink a stellar success

  • Alex da Silva and Cam Yung
    A pair of students listen to Drew Feustel's answer after asking a question during the Ask An Astronaut: Educational Downlink event, alongside Alex da Silva, left, and Cam Yung, right. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Drew Feustel]
    Drew Feustel (PhD’95) rotates as he answers a question from the International Space Station during Friday's Ask An Astronaut: Educational Downlink event.
  • [Ask An Astronaut Cutout]
    Una D'Elia (Art History) poses in the astronaut cutouts with her daughter Zoe during the Ask An Astronaut: Educational Downlink event on Friday at Grant Hall
  • [NASA Postdoctoral Fellow and Planetary Scientist Michelle Thompson (Artsci’11, Sc’11)]
    NASA Postdoctoral Fellow and Planetary Scientist Michelle Thompson (Artsci'11, Sc'11) talks about her experiences in trying to qualify as an astronaut.
  • [Cam Yung, the 35th rector of Queen's, and Alex da Silva, the 36th rector]
    Cam Yung, the 35th rector of Queen's, and Alex da Silva, the 36th rector, open the Ask An Astronaut: Educational Downlink festivities at Grant Hall.
  • [Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Art McDonald speaks with a pair of elementary school students]
    Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Art McDonald speaks with a pair of elementary school students who attended Friday's Ask An Astronaut: Educational Downlink event. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • [Nandini Deshpande from the School of Rehabilitation Therapy]
    Nandini Deshpande (School of Rehabilitation Therapy) talks about the effects of microgravity on humans as well as her experience as a visiting scholar at NASA.
  • [Indira Feustel and Daniel Woolf]
    Indira Feustel talks with Principal Daniel Woolf as people fill Grant Hall for the Ask An Astronaut: Educational Downlink event held in Grant Hall.

Projected onto the same stage that he graduated on 23 years ago, Andrew (Drew) Feustel (PhD’95) shared his expertise from 408 km above the Earth in the International Space Station (ISS) during Ask an Astronaut: a NASA Education Downlink event in Grant Hall.

A stellar lineup of speakers who took to the stage before the downlink began included NASA Postdoctoral Fellow and Planetary Scientist Michelle Thompson (Artsci’11, Sc’11) as well as Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald, Nathalie Ouellette (MSc’12, PhD’16) of the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC), and Nandini Deshpande from the School of Rehabilitation Therapy.

Dr. Thompson shared her experience applying to NASA and the Canadian Space Agency and about her research as a planetary scientist. Dr. McDonald explained how the SNOLAB and ISS have a lot in common as extreme environments for research. Dr. Ouellette shared her research in astrophysics, and how she works collaboratively with other research teams to unravel the mysteries of the universe. Dr. Deshpande walked through the research she conducts on astronauts to understand muscle atrophy and cardiovascular issues that affect astronauts in space.

The 20-minute video feed began just after noon when NASA connected Grant Hall to the ISS. Indira Feustel, Dr. Feustel’s wife, greeted her husband and thanked Queen’s for the warm welcome after travelling from Houston for the event. She also shared a video from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who congratulated Dr. Feustel for his work and for inspiring the next generation of researchers.

Dr. Feustel answered 24 questions from the Queen’s and Kingston community, ranging from local elementary and high school student to Queen’s students, professors, and alumni.

“One of the greatest impacts of my life has been how my perspective has changed on Earth, from up here on the space station. There’s only one home for us now, and it’s fragile,” said Dr. Feustel, answering Dr. Thompson’s question about how his perspective on Earth and humanity’s place in the universe has changed. ”We would be in a different world if folks could see how I see it from the ISS; no borders, one Earth.”

Other participants asked questions about how astronauts sleep in space, what to study to become an astronaut, and if astronauts play tag on the ISS.

The event wrapped up with a sign off from Dr. Feustel, thanking Queen’s for the chance to participate in the first Educational Downlink from NASA hosted by a Canadian university.

Grant Hall was decorated festively for the event, featuring life sized cutouts of Dr. Feustel for photos, big banners to sign to wish Dr. Feustel luck, and tables featuring displays from Graduate Studies and the Queen’s Reduced Gravity group.

In case you missed the event, check out the live video available on the Queen's Facebook feed. 

An exercise in caring

Queen’s Cares Alternative Reading Week offers undergraduate and graduate students valuable experience off campus as well as an opportunity to connect with the Kingston community.

[Queen's Cares works with KEYS Employment Centre]
One of the teams of Queen's students taking part in Queen's Cares worked with the KEYS Job Centre on a project to help a group of Syrian women, new to Kingston, develop entrepreneurial skills. From left: Areejah Umar; Katie Lu; Matthias Hermann; and Rodrigo Belda Manrique. (University Communications) 

For many university students, Reading Week is an opportunity to catch up on studies, take a break, or head home for a bit of family time.

But for one group of Queen’s students it was an opportunity to learn more about the Kingston community, lend a hand to the local support network, and connect with fellow students.

The Queen’s Cares Alternative Reading Week program is a community-engaged learning initiative, run by the Student Experience Office (SEO) in Student Affairs, offering students the opportunity to work in teams on a project that has been identified as a need by a local community organization.

For Matthias Hermann, a doctoral student in the Department of Chemistry originally from Germany, Queen’s Cares offered a chance to engage with the community. As a graduate student he applied for the project leader position and worked with KEYS Job Centre on a project to help a group of Syrian women, new to Kingston, develop entrepreneurial skills.

[Queen's Cares and the Boys and Girls Club]
A team of students participating in this year's Queen's Cares Alternative Reading Week helped out at the Boys and Girls Club of Kingston and Area. From left: Cordelia Staffieri; Megan Clemens; Yonie Ye; Bertug Yoruk and Kori Cembal, Manager, Volunteer Services and Special Events, Boys and Girls Club. (University Communications)

“I thought Queen’s Cares was a good way to become more aware of what is happening in the community, so I thought why not sign up. I also thought that through the project leader position I would be able to develop some leadership skills, some organizational-planning skills, which is also a big part of my PhD program or something that will be useful once I am finished with my doctorate,” he says. “Those expectations were fulfilled.”

He also enjoyed meeting and interacting with community members,  as well as the team of Queen’s students.

“It was nice working with the Syrian group and developing a sense of cultural difference when interacting with them while at the same time having a group of motivated students who stayed here for Reading Week,” he says. “Working with a motivated group of undergrad students who could go home or do something else was a really nice experience.”

Fanny Wang, a fourth-year Concurrent Education student, worked on a project with Focus Forward for Indigenous Youth. She got involved because she wanted to connect with people from diverse backgrounds and learn about their stories.

Queen’s Cares provided a valuable learning experience and an opportunity for personal reflection, she says.

“At the end of the program, I learned about just a slice of the experiences of the Canadian Indigenous population,” she says. “Coming from a background where my culture shapes a lot of who I am, I cannot imagine what it must feel like to have your culture and history taken away. I realized how fiercely I hold on to the idea that I am Chinese-Canadian and, just recently, warming up to the idea of being different. The difficultly for some Aboriginal youths to self-identify stems from deep societal and historical issues. These thoughts are some that pushed me to think outside of my comfort zone and encouraged me to be more reflective about my own experiences and how different systems work in society. How certain systems work can either benefit some or be damaging to others. There’s a lot of learning and re-learning that needs to take place in my life.” 

Other community partners included One Roof Kingston Youth Hub, the Boys and Girls Club, Kingston Community Health Centres’ Change the Conversation, and The H’Art School.

“We are thrilled to have built so many great connections with organizations this year so that Queen’s students can learn from a variety of community partners and work collaboratively in addressing community-identified needs,” says Kevin Collins, Coordinator, Community Engaged Learning in the SEO. “As the program continues to grow, we are excited to be offering international placements for students in February 2019 so that our students can partner with communities both here in Kingston and overseas.” 

Since it began three years ago, the Queen’s Cares program has continued to grow and 30 students from across faculties and schools took part this year. Information on the international placements will be announced in the summer.

For more information, visit the Student Experience Office website

One year of ‘Extending the Rafters’

An event on campus marked the anniversary of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force's final report.

  • On Friday afternoon, members of the community met at the Agnes to create art designed to inspire a visual response to the Truth and Reconciliation Task Force report's recommendations. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    On Friday afternoon, members of the community met at the Agnes to create art designed to inspire a visual response to the Truth and Reconciliation Task Force report's recommendations. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) speaks with attendees of the "Extending the Rafters" event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) speaks with attendees of the "Extending the Rafters" event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Members of the Queen’s community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the release of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Members of the Queen’s community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the release of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • There were performances by Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee singers, as well as a traditional feast. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    There were performances by Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee singers, as well as a traditional feast. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Law students Sofia Gabbani and Lauren Winkler take questions from the podium at the "Extending the Rafters" event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Law students Sofia Gabbani and Lauren Winkler take questions from the podium at the "Extending the Rafters" event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

Friday saw a feast of celebrations at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, as members of the Queen’s and local Indigenous communities came together to mark an important anniversary.

In March 2017, the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Task Force issued its final report. “Extending the Rafters” contained 25 recommendations aimed at building better relations between Queen’s and Indigenous communities. It acknowledged the role Queen’s has played in traditions which caused harm to Indigenous communities, and that the institution needed to do a better job in educating students about Indigenous Peoples. Later this month, the Provost’s Office will release a formal report that will provide an update on the progress made on those recommendations.  

In the meantime, the event, which was hosted by the Agnes and the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, offered attendees the opportunity to reflect and celebrate the year gone by. Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Director of Indigenous Initiatives, opened the event with brief remarks, and there were performances by Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee singers.

This event was generously funded by the Community Foundation for Kingston & Area: Jim & Julie Parker Fund, The Regina Rosen Fund, The Edward Ratcliffe Fund, and the Larry Gibson Community Fund.

Some members of the Queen’s community have also offered up their thoughts to the Gazette on reconciliation efforts at Queen’s over the past year:

Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Director, Indigenous Initiatives; and TRC Task Force member

“I am pleased and encouraged by the level of engagement with the report and recommendations across every sector of the university.

Senior administration very early on undertook KAIROS and Cultural Safety training, thereby modeling to the rest of campus the importance of taking responsibility for our own learning. Strategic planning documents are considering and incorporating aspects of Indigenous knowledge and engagement; events and services are working towards inclusion of Indigenous customs and language; faculties are increasing Indigenous knowledges in faculty hires and curriculum; and student groups are being more mindful of inclusion of Indigenous students, customs, and language.

As many have said, we still have a lot of work to do but we have made amazing progress this year and I am hopeful going forward.”

Thanyehténhas (Nathan Brinklow), Lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, and part-time Chaplain

"I have been very excited to see the progress of the Mohawk Language Certificate as it approaches final approval. This is exactly the kind of program which the university can support that will make a positive contribution to the future of the language in our communities. The support from the various committees who have offered their input has been very encouraging and it is just one small part of the overall direction and mandate from the TRC that the university has embraced."

Kandice Baptiste, Director, Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre

"As we reflect on the contributions of both the national and Queen’s reports and their calls to action, it’s important to honour the spirit of which those reports were crafted in. Reconciliation requires actions born out of love; for land, nationhood, youth, knowledge keepers, and a future that breathes new life into creating a more just country and campus."

Mark Green, Professor and Associate Head, Civil Engineering; and co-chair of the TRC Task Force

"I was honoured and excited to be a part of the TRC task force team. I have been quite delighted at the response the report has received and the leadership taken by senior university administration in terms of readily implementing many of the initial recommendations. I can see great progress has been made over the past year.

There has also been a groundswell, a grassroots response - people at every level of the university want to contribute in different ways. The leadership has helped to make that happen, but a lot of people are thinking it is the right thing to do and want to contribute.

There still is a lot to do. Modifications to curriculum, and building real connections to Indigenous communities where we can have long-term impact in building capacity, will be challenges moving forward."

Vanessa McCourt, Aboriginal Advisor, Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre; and member of the TRC Task Force

"As the contact staff who sends out event notices to the broader Queen’s community, I can say it has been a remarkably busy year since the release of the TRC task force report! Many faculties, departments, student groups have taken it upon themselves to organize events incorporating Indigeneity and beginning the work of reconciliation.

My hope is that this momentum continues. While there is much being done, much more still needs to be accomplished. Our students are still feeling unsafe on campus, primarily in classroom settings – both by other students in the class, and their professors."

Wiiwagaa'ige (Darian Doblej) (Artsci’18), member of the University Council on Anti-racism and Equity (UCARE), and Co-chair of the Queen’s Native Students Association Conference Planning Committee 

"I am proud to see Queen's take steps to make campus a better place for Indigenous students. But there is always much more to do. The end of the report should have read 'to be continued' as this work will never end here on campus so far that Indigenous students aren't achieving their full potential, and that Queen's students aren't being fully educated on issues that matter to Canada, their fields, and to them.

As we look to one year and beyond, we have an opportunity to make history and create new paths to be one of the best campuses across Canada for Indigenous students. The TRC gives Queen's the mandate to set out an ambitious vision, take bold steps and think of new ways."

Dylan Robinson, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts

“I am happy to see the university implementing change that responds to the TRC report. And yet the reality is that we still have few Indigenous faculty at Queen’s, and the kind of transformation called for in the report will not be able to occur without the leadership of Indigenous faculty across all departments and programs.”

For The Record: April 5, 2018

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

The next issue of For the Record will be published Thursday, April 26. The deadline for submitting information is Tuesday, April 24. For the Record is published bi-weekly throughout the academic year and monthly during the summer.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette Editor Andrew Carroll.

COMMITTEES

Advisory Search Committee — Assistant Dean, Academic Affairs and Programmatic Quality Assurance, Undergraduate Medical Education

An Advisory Search Committee has been established to provide advice on the leadership for the new position Assistant Dean, Academic Affairs and Programmatic Quality Assurance, Undergraduate Medical Education. The composition of the committee is as follows:

  • Dr. Leslie Flynn (Chair), Vice-Dean, Education, Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Stephen Archer, Head, Department of Medicine
  • Dr. Carl Chauvin, Resident, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
  • Jacqueline Findlay, Manager, Staffing and Student Support
  • Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick, Director, Student Affairs, Wellness Advisor
  • Dr. Laura Milne, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine
  • Dr. Susan Moffatt, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine
  • Cale Templeton, Current student and President, Aesculapian Society
  • Dr. Richard van Wylick, Chair, CBME Faculty Development Committee and Director, Faculty Development, Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Christine Irving (Secretary), Senior Staffing Officer, Faculty of Health Sciences

Faculty, staff, students, residents and all other members of the hospital and university communities, are invited to submit names of possible candidates for the position of Assistant Dean, Academic Affairs and Programmatic Quality Assurance and the reasons for supporting each nominee. Written submissions are to be directed to the chair c/o Christine Irving, Faculty of Health Sciences, Macklem House, 18 Barrie St., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6. Electronic submissions can be forwarded to christine.irving@queensu.ca.

While submissions will be accepted throughout the search process, it will be advantageous for the committee to have them by Friday, April 27, 2018. Responses received will remain confidential and will be shared only with the members of the review committee; Anonymous submissions will not be considered.

Advisory Search Committee — Assistant Dean, Curriculum, Undergraduate Medical Education

An Advisory Search Committee has been established to provide advice on the leadership for the new position Assistant Dean, Curriculum, Undergraduate Medical Education. The composition of the committee is as follows:

  • Dr. Leslie Flynn (Chair), Vice-Dean, Education, Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Stephen Archer, Head, Department of Medicine
  • Dr. Carl Chauvin, Resident, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
  • Jacqueline Findlay, Manager, Staffing and Student Support
  • Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick, Director, Student Affairs, Wellness Advisor
  • Dr. Laura Milne, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine
  • Dr. Susan Moffatt, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine
  • Cale Templeton, Current student and President, Aesculapian Society
  • Dr. Richard van Wylick, Chair, CBME Faculty Development Committee and Director, Faculty Development, Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Christine Irving (Secretary), Senior Staffing Officer, Faculty of Health Sciences

Faculty, staff, students, residents and all other members of the hospital and university communities, are invited to submit names of candidates for the position of Assistant Dean, Curriculum and the reasons for supporting each nominee. Written submissions are to be directed to the chair c/o Christine Irving, Faculty of Health Sciences, Macklem House, 18 Barrie St., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6. Electronic submissions can be forwarded to christine.irving@queensu.ca.

While submissions will be accepted throughout the search process, it will be advantageous for the committee to have them by Friday, April 27, 2018. Responses received will remain confidential and will be shared only with the members of the review committee; Anonymous submissions will not be considered.

NOTICES

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Supervision

The School of Graduate Studies invites nominations for consideration for the 2018 Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Supervision.  The purpose of this award is to recognize outstanding supervisors who demonstrate excellence in advising, monitoring and mentoring their graduate students.  Two awards will be made: one in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and one in Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Engineering. Please see the attached guidelines, nomination form, and tips for preparing nomination packages. Nomination packages should be submitted to the Dean, School of Graduate Studies, Gordon Hall 425, by 4 pm on Friday, May 25.

SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES

Job Title: Surface Facility Instrumentation Manager
Department: Chemistry
Competition: 2017-162, R022
Successful Candidate: Kevin McEleney

Job Title: Revenue and Compensation Administrator
Department: Family Medicine
Competition: J1017-0687
Successful Candidate: Kelly Moore

Job Title: Research Accounting Analyst (USW Local 2010)
Department: Financial Services
Competition: J0318-0111
Successful Candidate: Mia Tsai (Department of Mining)

Job Title: Admission Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
Competition: J1217-0643
Successful Candidate: Andre DeGagne

Job Title: Department Manager
Department: History
Competition: J0118-1195
Successful Candidate: Matthew Colby

Job Title: Electrician (CUPE Local 229)
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: J1217-0511
Successful Candidate: Jesse Bambrick

Job Title: Payment Specialist (USW Local 2010)
Department: Financial Services
Competition: J0118-0926
Successful Candidate: Barb Aubin

Job Title: Admissions and Registration Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: School of Graduate Studies
Competition: J0218-0119
Successful Candidate: Karen Arnold

Job Title: Budget Coordinator
Department: Planning and Budgetting
Competition: J1217-0542
Successful Candidate: Shaun Horner

Job Title: Admissions and Recruitment Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
Competition: J0118-0924
Successful Candidate: Samantha Samson (Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment)

Major donation supports student health and wellness

The Côté Sharp Family Foundation is donating $5 million to help create a new centralized wellness centre.

  • [Dennis Sharp speaks at announcement]
    Dennis Sharp speaks while Hélène Côté Sharp looks on during the announcement of a $5 million gift to Queen's from the Côté Sharp Family Foundation in support of student health and wellness. (University Communications)
  • Dennis Sharp speaks during the $5 million donation announcement
    Dennis Sharp speaks during the announcement of a $5 million gift to Queen's from the Côté Sharp Family Foundation on Thursday, April 5, at Beamish-Munro Hall. (University Communications)
  • [Hélène Côté Sharp and Dennis Sharp receive a gift]
    Hélène Côté Sharp and Dennis Sharp receive a gift – a roof shingle from the former Physical Education Centre – to mark their donation of $5 million in support of student health and wellness at Queen's. At left is student Jennifer Williams and Principal Daniel Woolf. (University Communications)
  • Hélène Côté Sharp listens to Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs]
    Hélène Côté Sharp listens to Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, during a tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre, while Dennis Sharp speaks with a Don Ellis employee. (University Communications)
  • [Geneviéve and Catherine Sharp tour IWC]
    Geneviève and Catherine Sharp tour the construction site of the Innovation and Wellness Centre with Tom Harris, Vice-Principal (Advancement). (University Communications)
  • [Côté Sharp family tours the Innovation and Wellness Centre]
    The Côté Sharp family toured the Innovation and Wellness Centre including the area that will become the Côté Sharp Student Wellness Centre. From left: Principal Daniel Woolf; Geneviève Sharp; Dennis Sharp; Hélène Côté Sharp; Catherine Sharp; and Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon. (University Communications)

Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, today announced a $5-million gift from Dennis Sharp (Sc’60) and Hélène Côté Sharp to support Queen’s University’s commitment to promoting student health and wellness.

In recognition of this gift, the Côté Sharp Student Wellness Centre will be an integral part of the new Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC), located in the heart of the Queen’s campus.

“The creation of the Côté Sharp Student Wellness Centre is allowing Queen’s to locate health and wellness services in a modern, centralized space on campus, fulfilling a key recommendation of the Principal’s Commission on Mental Health Report from 2012,” says Principal Woolf. “The location of the centre on the main floor of the IWC will help increase awareness of our student wellness-related services, and how they are evolving to meet the needs of Queen’s student population.”

In the Côté Sharp Student Wellness Centre, students will learn about health and well-being, build skills, receive excellent medical and counselling services, and access academic accommodations for wellness-related needs, including medical, mental health, and disability. A diverse and specialized team of doctors, nurses, occupational therapists, personal counsellors, social workers, psychologists, psychotherapists, psychiatrists, accessibility advisors, and support staff will offer comprehensive services in the new space.

“The student wellness centre will be a tremendous addition to the campus as it is in a central and easily accessible location as well as being an integral part of a broader and exciting innovation complex,” says Mr. Sharp. “What we hope to accomplish through the Wellness Centre, whether we are addressing mental health or whether we are talking about less complex issues, is the creation of an innovative, welcoming, and supportive environment where students can readily access assistance and interact with other students and caregivers through a positive and enriching exchange.”

The Innovation and Wellness Centre is built upon the former physical footprint of the Physical Education Centre (PEC). The PEC was always a place where students, staff, and faculty came together to pursue their extracurricular interests and their health and fitness; the IWC continues this tradition.

“The move to the new Innovation and Wellness Centre provides Student Wellness Services with the opportunity to plan and implement new technologies, and enhance processes to benefit students,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs. “As well, the Côté Sharp Centre’s co-location with other student services and academic spaces reflects the connection we make between wellness, the student experience, and student success. We are all very excited for the opening this fall.”

 Along with the Côté Sharp donation, significant contributions from fellow alumni, the federal and provincial governments, and other friends of Queen’s will enable the Innovation and Wellness Centre to be the hub for innovation at Queen’s, with state of the art engineering facilities and increased innovation facilities for both students and researchers.

The Côté Sharp Student Wellness Centre joins the Beaty Water Research Centre as two of the first named facilities within the IWC. In February 2017, water research got a new home thanks to a $5 million gift from Ross J. Beaty. The Beaty Water Research Centre will include 8,000 square feet of new lab space, and join other experiential learning and research spaces in the IWC. The centre is set to open in fall 2018.

Feustel ready to phone home

The Ask an Astronaut: NASA Educational Downlink event on Friday will feature a live chat with an astronaut alumnus in space and on-Earth expert speakers.

The Queen’s and Kingston community is invited to a one-of-a-kind event in Canada.

The Ask an Astronaut: Educational Downlink event set to launch on Friday, April 6, will feature a 20-minute NASA Educational Downlink with astronaut and Queen’s alumnus Andrew (Drew) Feustel (PhD’95), live from the International Space Station. The space-to-Queen’s conversation will last 20 minutes, during which selected members of the Queen’s and Kingston community will ask their questions about space, researching aboard the International Space Station, and the journey to become an astronaut.

Astronaut and alumnus Andrew Feustel (PhD’95) poses above the Earth. (Photo: @Andrew_Feustel on Twitter)
Astronaut and alumnus Andrew Feustel (PhD’95) poses above the Earth. (Photo: @Andrew_Feustel on Twitter)

There will be plenty of action before the downlink, featuring presentations from experts across a wide range of space-related specialties, including Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald, NASA Postdoctoral Fellow and Planetary Scientist Michelle Thompson (Artsci’11, Sc’11), Nathalie Ouellette (MSc’12, PhD’16) of the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC), and Nandini Deshpande from the School of Rehabilitation Therapy.

Other festivities include astronaut cut-outs to take a photo with Dr. Feustel or as an astronaut in space, signing banners to wish Dr. Feustel luck, and tables featuring displays from Graduate Studies and the Queen’s Reduced Gravity group.

Doors open at Grant Hall at 10:30 am and seats will be limited. There are three additional locations that will offer a livestream of the event when Grant Hall fills to capacity at the Athletics and Recreation Centre Student Lounge, Goodes Hall Commons, and in the Faculty of Education on west campus.

The event will be broadcasted on NASA TV and streamed on the Queen’s website and on Facebook live. To view the livestream on your computer or phone, register through the Queen’s Research page.

Check out the Queen’s Facebook page for more information about the event.

Doctoral candidate receives inaugural art award

Tanya Lukin Linklater is the first recipient of the Wanda Koop Research Fund, which supports mid-career artists.

[Tanya Lukin Linklater]
Tanya Lukin Linklater is a doctoral candidate and artist. She recently received a national research fund recognizing her work. (Photo by Brandon Gray)

It was a call Tanya Lukin Linklater wasn’t expecting.

Ms. Lukin Linklater, an artist and Queen’s doctoral candidate, was recently named the recipient of the Canadian Art Foundation’s inaugural Wanda Koop Research Fund. This new research fund, worth $15,000, was named for the Winnipeg artist appearing on the cover of the first issue of Canadian Art in fall 1984.

Ms. Lukin Linklater is Alutiiq and originates from the Native Villages of Afognak and Port Lions in Alaska. She is currently based in northern Ontario, and that setting has been inspiring her most recent work.

“I spend time thinking through and investigating Indigenous ideas in dance, performance, video, and installation primarily,” she says. “My work carries a deep responsibility to Indigenous peoples, and I am mindful to work in a good way and to respectfully be in relation to community. I follow questions or ideas, investigating where they will go, and that helps me determine which medium I work in and through to share an idea.”

Most recently, Ms. Lukin Linklater developed a performance called Sun Force, in response to the work of Rita Letendre at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Ms. Lukin Linklater was an artist-in-residence at the Art Gallery of Ontario where Rita Letendre’s retrospective, Fire & Light, was shown. Letendre’s practice of abstract painting became the impetus for Ms. Lukin Linklater’s performance.

She also completed a video entitled The treaty is the body which shares Indigenous understandings of treaty relationships, and challenges non-Indigenous audiences to consider their responsibilities in relation to treaty.

[A still from The treaty is the body video. By Tanya Lukin Linklater and Liz Lott]
A still from The treaty is the body video highlighting two of the video's youth dancers. (Photo by Tanya Lukin Linklater and Liz Lott)

The recipients of the Wanda Koop Research Fund are selected by a ‘who’s-who’ of art experts from across the country. The judging panel called Ms. Lukin Linklater’s work, “complex, engaging, multidimensional, and inspiring”.

“Our selection recognizes an artist who continues to grow and flourish in her art creation and intellectual artistic investigations,” Julie Nagam, chair of the history of Indigenous arts of North America at the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the University of Winnipeg told CanadianArt.ca on behalf of the judging panel. “Her practice is leading the way in terms of performance, dance and installation-based work and we were excited for her to be the inaugural recipient of a mid-career award for a visual artist.”

[Sun Force by Tanya Lukin Linklater]
Sun Force by Tanya Lukin Linklater. (Supplied Photo)

Ms. Lukin Linklater’s next works will explore Alaskan Native objects – a topic that is personal to her, but one she has not revisited recently. The Queen’s community will get to see the outcome of that work as she produces a new performance for the Soundings Festival that is scheduled for March 2019 at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

In the meantime, Ms. Lukin Linklater also has her doctoral studies to work on. She started her doctorate part-time in 2015 in the field of cultural studies. Ms. Lukin Linklater’s supervisor, Dylan Robinson, was pleased to hear about the recognition for her artistic practice.

“Her work has received significant attention over the past few years, with major commissions including her work for La Biennale de Montréal in 2016 and her participation in documenta 14, a major international series of contemporary art exhibitions,” says Dr. Robinson, who is the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts at Queen’s. “The PhD research she has undertaken through Queens’ Cultural Studies Program is exciting and this important award recognizes her leadership in the area of Indigenous research-creation.”

“I am privileged to work with Dr. Robinson and my committee,” she says. “My doctoral work has contributed significantly to my practice by reminding me of some of the essential questions I grapple with – for example, how Indigenous ways of being and knowing are embodied in our present circumstances, despite colonialism – while giving me an opportunity to investigate, learn, and contribute to the production of knowledge in the field of Indigenous arts.”

The Wanda Koop Research Fund prize is valued at $15,000, and is intended to support travel and research costs.

To learn more about Tanya Lukin Linklater and her work, visit her website. She was also recently featured on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s (CBC’s) Exhibitionists program.

Undergraduate applications to Queen’s remain strong

[March Break Open House at Beamish-Munro Hall]
More than 4,000 prospective students, applicants and family members attended Queen’s March Break Open House on March 10. This annual campus-wide event offers students the opportunity to tour campus and residence, try the food, attend a mini-lecture, meet faculty, staff and current students.

Applications to first-year undergraduate studies at Queen’s for Fall 2018 are up 15 per cent over last year; this compares to an 8 per cent increase in applications province-wide.

The total number of applications to Queen’s for 4,522 spaces in direct-entry, first-year programs across all faculties and schools surpassed 40,000 for the first time to reach 42,404. Queen’s has seen significant year-over-year increases in total applications for the past several years, as well as applications among students applying from across Ontario, students applying from across Canada, and among international students.

“In addition to an increasing number of applications, we are also seeing significant year-over-year increases in the percentage of students who are ranking Queen’s as their first choice,” says Stuart Pinchin, Executive Director, Undergraduate Admission and Recruitment. “This reflects the strength of our programs and the quality of the student experience. We are now out talking to students around the world who have been offered admission, to answer any questions they may have about their academic program, residences and the entire Queen’s experience.”

Applications from high school students studying outside Ontario have increased 32 per cent, and applications from international students have increased by 53 per cent. Furthermore, applications from self-identified Indigenous students have increased 9 per cent over last year and by 88 per cent since 2011-12.

International enrolment has been guided by an undergraduate international recruitment plan, and last fall, the university established a First Generation Admission Policy to encourage students who would be first in their family to attend university to come to Queen’s. Applications from self-identified first-generation students have increased by 13 per cent.

First Generation admission award has also been created that is available to students who are granted admission through this new policy. This new award builds on the financial aid currently available to all first-generation students at Queen’s, which includes need-based admission bursaries. Further, the university has created a GTA-based outreach recruiter who connects with first-generation students from diverse backgrounds, and with community groups that serve and support these youth.

“We are committed to increasingly diversifying the incoming class,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs. “Our campus community is enriched by students with different backgrounds and experience from across Canada and around the world.”

Queen’s will continue to make offers of admission until mid-May.

Learn more about Undergraduate Admission and Recruitment at Queen’s.

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