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Employee and Family Assistance Program provider publishes December edition of Lifelines

[Lifelines December 2018]
Read the December 2018 edition of Lifelines online.

As the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) provider for Queen’s University, Homewood Health publishes a number of regular newsletters, including Lifelines.

The monthly newsletter is intended to support key personnel with a wealth of information on the topic presented. The December edition is entitled Holiday Stress and Anxiety Prevention.

For more information on the Queen’s EFAP, visit the Human Resources website.

For 24-hour EFAP services call 1-800-663-1142 (English) or 1-866-398-9505 (French).

Junior Gaels Football Club unveiled

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation announces local football organization Limestone District Grenadiers is the second member of the Junior Gaels program.

[Junior Gaels Football]

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation has partnered with the Limestone District Grenadiers, making the football club the second local minor sports organization to join the Junior Gaels program.

With the agreement the newly-rebranded Junior Gaels Football Club will suit up in tricolour for the organization’s 15th season.

“This is the second announcement of the exciting release of a Junior Gaels program. The simple goal of the Junior Gaels concept is to inspire local Kingston athletes to attend Queen’s, and one day play for the Gaels,” says Jeff Downie, Director, Business Development and Operations, Queen’s Athletics and Recreation. “This partnership is an extension of an existing arrangement. Richardson Stadium has been the home of the Grenadiers and Queen’s student-athletes were part of the Grenadiers coaching staff this summer. We look forward to our current student-athletes connecting with the Kingston community in a new way.”

During the 2018 U SPORTS season, 43 former Grenadiers played football for universities and colleges across the country, including 12 players with the Queen’s Gaels. 

“The club has been working with Queen’s Athletics for several months to enhance our existing partnership, improve our efforts to strengthen the football community in our region, and to provide even more amazing opportunities to our players and their families,” says Alexandra Reyes-Walsh, the president of Junior Gaels Football. 

All participants in the Junior Gaels program will receive benefits such as:

  • Opportunities to meet and learn from current Gaels athletes
  • Coaching support from current Queen's coaches
  • Free admission to Gaels sporting events
  • Special Junior Gaels programming at the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC)
  • Discounts, promotions and much more

Junior Gaels Football is a AAA club based in Kingston that plays within the Ontario Provincial Football League against competitive teams from Ottawa to Windsor.

“Any athlete 12 to 19 years old is welcome to try out for Junior Gaels Football,” says Reyes-Walsh. 

The Junior Gaels Football Club remains an independent entity as a not-for-profit organization with its own board of directors. Registration opens Jan. 2 at www.jrgaelsfootball.ca.

The partnership has also landed its first big event to be held this summer.

“As part of our ongoing partnership we are also pleased to announce that we have been successful in our efforts with Queen’s Athletics to host the 2019 Football Canada Cup and the U16 Eastern Challenge to be held at Richardson Stadium in July," says Reyes-Walsh.

Close to 500 players and 100 coaches will take part in the event from July 8-14.

Last week, it was announced the Kingston Clippers soccer organization was the first member of the Junior Gaels program.

An inside look at Mitchell Hall

Kingston and the Islands MP Mark Gerretsen visits campus for a tour of Mitchell Hall.

  • John Witjes (Associate Vice Principal (Facilities)) points out architectural details inside Mitchell Hall to MP Mark Gerretsen.
    John Witjes (Associate Vice Principal (Facilities)) points out architectural details inside Mitchell Hall to MP Mark Gerretsen.
  • Kevin Deluzio (Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences) shows MP Mark Gerretsen one of the Active Learning Classrooms on the second floor of Mitchell Hall.
    Kevin Deluzio (Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences) shows MP Mark Gerretsen one of the Active Learning Classrooms on the second floor of Mitchell Hall.
  • The original brickwork of the Physical Education Centre facade, as seen from the second floor of Mitchell Hall.
    The original brickwork of the Physical Education Centre facade, as seen from the second floor of Mitchell Hall.
  • MP Gerretsen views the Mitchell Hall Commons from a second floor workspace. The Commons provides a new campus event space - for guest speakers and other events.
    MP Gerretsen views the Mitchell Hall Commons from a second floor workspace. The Commons provides a new campus event space - for guest speakers and other events.
  • MP Gerretsen and AVP John Witjes discuss the restoration of the exposed brick behind the building's facade. The stone face of the original Physical Education Centre was restored and incorporated into the new facility's design
    MP Gerretsen and AVP John Witjes discuss the restoration of the exposed brick behind the building's facade. The stone face of the original Physical Education Centre was restored and incorporated into the new facility's design
  • MP Gerretsen, Mark Green (Professor and Vice-Dean, FEAS) and Ann Tierney (Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs) discuss the mixture of new wellness and research facilities inside Mitchell Hall.
    MP Gerretsen, Mark Green (Professor and Vice-Dean, FEAS) and Ann Tierney (Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs) discuss the mixture of new wellness and research facilities inside Mitchell Hall.

Kingston and the Islands Member of Parliament, Mark Gerretsen (Artsci'06), visited campus on Friday, Dec. 7 for a tour of the newly-opened Mitchell Hall. Accompanied by Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Kevin Deluzio, Professor and Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment) Mark Green, and  Associate Vice Principal (Facilities) John Witjes, Gerretsen toured the building's active learning classrooms, the revitalized Bartlett Gym, the new home of Student Wellness Services, and the third floor laboratory spaces.

Mitchell Hall opened to students on Monday, Dec. 3. Over the months of December and January, more facilities will open their doors, including the Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC), Faith and Spiritual Life, and Student Community Relations, which are all moving from the John Deutsch University Centre (JDUC) to Mitchell Hall, as well as the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC). A grand opening ceremony is scheduled for Spring 2019.

Mr. Gerretsen last toured Mitchell Hall (then named the Innovation and Wellness Centre) in late 2017 – early in the facility's construction. In October 2016, the Government of Canada invested $31 million in two Queen's campus projects – including Mitchell Hall – through the Postsecondary Institutions Strategic Infrastructure Fund.

Engineers keep memories alive

Debut of choral piece helps mark National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

  • Placng a rose in the vase
    An engineering student places a rose in a vase after reading a brief outline of one of the victims of the Dec. 6, 1989 killings of 14 women at l’École Polytechnique. (University Communications)
  • Rose and Candle ceremony
    A group of 13 engineering students and a staff member represented the 14 victims of the Dec. 6, 1989 killings of 14 women at l’École Polytechnique during Friday's memorial ceremony. (University Communications)
  • Choir Performance
    EngChoir debuts the choral piece "Chrysalides", co-written by fourth-year engineering student and EngChoir Director Monet Slinowsky, right. (University Communications)
  • Lynann Clapham
    Professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Lynann Clapham talks about her own experiences as an engineer, a field often dominated by men. (University Communications)
  • Tiffanie Bankosky
    Tiffanie Bankosky, a fourth-year engineering student and ceremony organizer, speaks during the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. (University Communications)

In a solemn ceremony on Thursday, the Queen’s community remembered the 14 women killed at Montreal’s l’École Polytechnique on Dec. 6 1989.

During the annual event, organized and hosted by the Engineering Society of Queen’s University, 13 female engineering students and one staff member held red roses, lit white candles, and read a brief outline of each of the victims.

A new addition to the ceremony was the EngChoir’s debut performance of the choral piece Chrysalides, co-written by fourth-year engineering student and EngChoir Director Monet Slinowsky. Read this Gazette article for more about the creation of the piece.

The event was attended by dozens of Queen’s community members, including students, faculty, staff, and administration members.

Twelve female engineering students, a nurse, and a faculty member were killed in the 1989 massacre. Three years after the attack, Dec. 6 was declared the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

Queen’s Athletics launches Junior Gaels program

[Junior Gaels]
Queen's Athletics and Recreation has partnered with the Kingston Clippers as part of the Junior Gaels program.

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation announced on Thursday the first partner in the launch of Junior Gaels brand and apparel program – the Kingston Clippers Soccer Club.
 
The partnership will see all Kingston Clippers house league and competitive league uniforms and apparel rebranded with Junior Gaels starting in 2019.

Queen’s Athletics will utilize its apparel and equipment partnership with T. Litzen and Nike to support the Junior Gaels brand. In addition to the new look, the largest soccer tournament in Eastern Ontario – will be renamed from the Ambassador Cup to the Gaels Cup.

“This is the first announcement of a number of exciting Junior Gaels partners for us. We have developed the Junior Gaels concept, with a simple goal in mind – inspiring youth Kingston athletes to attend Queen’s, and one day play for Queen’s,” says Jeff Downie, Director, Business Development and Operations. “Connecting our current student-athletes in a new way with the local community allows them to act as mentors to all the young athletes in Kingston. I hope this gives our young athletes in Kingston a sense of being part of something bigger. If a young girl through this Junior Gaels partnership realizes she can continue her athletic pursuits at the university or college level – then we will have succeeded.”

All participants in the Junior Gaels program will receive benefits like:

  • Opportunities to meet and learn from current Gaels athletes
  • Coaching support from current Queen's coaches
  • Free admission to Gaels sporting events
  • Special Junior Gaels programming at the Athletics & Recreation Centre (ARC)
  • Discounts, promotions and much more

“Based on our shared values, we are pleased to announce an expansion of our partnership with Queen’s University,” says Sean O'Brien, President, Kingston Clippers Soccer Club. “Previously, Queen’s has partnered with our club to support our men’s and women’s Premier/League One soccer teams. This includes sharing facilities, staff and administration resources through a clear, long-term partnership agreement. We are pleased to expand this partnership to provide greater support to our grassroots and recreational programs and promote active family living opportunities in our community with the Junior Gaels program.” 
The new Junior Gaels brand and uniforms will launch in 2019.

Awards recognize outstanding staff at Queen’s

Principal Daniel Woolf presents the Special Recognition for Staff Awards during the Principal’s Holiday Reception.

  • Special Recognition for Staff Awards
    This year's winners of the Special Recognition for Staff Awards stand with Principal Daniel Woolf in the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf hands out the Special Recognition for Staff Awards
    Principal Daniel Woolf congratulates the recipients of the Special Recognition for Staff Awards during the Principal’s Holiday Reception on Wednesday, Dec. 5.
  • Principal’s Holiday Reception
    Queen's staff members make their food selections during the Principal’s Holiday Reception, one of the many event held Wednesday as part of Staff Appreciation Day.
  • Principal’s Holiday Reception
    Hundreds of Queen's staff members fill the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre for the Principal’s Holiday Reception.

The contributions and accomplishments of Queen’s staff were celebrated on Wednesday, Dec. 5 as the annual Principal’s Holiday Reception was hosted in the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC).

One of the many events on Staff Appreciation Day, Principal Daniel Woolf also handed out the Special Recognition for Staff Awards.

This year’s winners are:

Karen Brick, Emily Culhane, Ignacio Donati, Stephanie Fischkohl, Marcia Irving, Loretta Kuruliak, Maeve McLatchie, Tom Nickerson,  Brandon Ruck, Julie Sharrard, Cathy Sheldrick, Industrial Relations Centre (Team)

The Industrial Relations Centre team is a finely tuned machine. Last year, they delivered 82 professional development programs to more than 1,600 people in nearly 400 different companies, representing private- and public-sector clients, unions and governments. That’s 25 more programs than the year before – an increase of 44 per cent. It was also their busiest year ever, with revenue up 30 per cent. These are impressive numbers, considering the personalized approach that the staff take with each participant.

When delivering programs across Canada and internationally, the team members are ambassadors for Queen’s, demonstrating the highest levels of collaboration, innovation, and customer focus.

Vera Kettnaker, Research Services

Clear. Precise. Impeccable. Timely. These are just some of the modifiers that describe Dr. Vera Kettnaker and her integral role in Queen’s research grants application process.  Since her arrival in 2014, Vera has provided expert advice to approximately 260 faculty members. She is known as an invaluable resource for Queen’s researchers. Her knowledge of the procedures and requirements of the various funding agencies and her outstanding technical and interdisciplinary knowledge enable her to critique the scientific content of each proposal and provide insight and technically relevant direction. In addition to sound advice and guidance, she also lends a patient and sympathetic ear when applications are unsuccessful.

PRINCIPAL’S HOLIDAY RECEPTION
Through the event a full bin of food was collected for the AMS Food Bank along with $170 in cash donations.
The handcrafted gingerbread house, courtesy of Queen’s Hospitality Services Sodexo, was won by Linda Lam of the School of Graduate Studies.

Arguably the most important Canadian funding competition for academic research in Natural Sciences and Engineering is the NSERC Discovery Grant program. Every year since she arrived at Queen’s, the success rate has been significantly higher than the national average. In the last competition, Queen’s had an 84 per cent success rate, compared with a Canada-wide average of 65 per cent.

Jackie Moore, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences

Jackie Moore is a change agent. Seven years ago, when Queen’s five basic science departments transitioned to the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, those involved relied heavily on Jackie’s dedication and commitment to the process, her exemplary organizational skills, and her intelligent council, gained from years of experience in her former department, Microbiology and Immunology. It is a real challenge to administer one of the university’s largest departments. It requires energy, intelligence, excellent interpersonal skills, and an unparalleled ability to multitask.

Despite her department head’s multiple roles, Jackie finds a way to screen, prioritize, reprioritize, coordinate, organize, and schedule and reschedule, sometimes for the fourth or fifth time. Jackie is responsible for managing the Human Body Donor program, working with the offices of the Chief Coroner of Ontario and prospective donors and families. This requires outstanding public relations skills and exceptional sensitivity, as well as being available after hours. She volunteers on the Faculty of Health Sciences Employee Engagement Committee, and helped to coordinate its first-annual engagement event, which exceeded all expectations.

Pat Tobin, Physical Plant Services

Pat Tobin’s attention to detail characterizes his work ethic and contributes to the positive impact he makes daily at the Douglas Library. He takes enormous pride in his work and it shows. Not only does he make sure that the space is clean and well maintained for staff, students, researchers, and donors, he will go the extra mile whenever needed. The W.D. Jordan Rare Books and Special Collections has some unique situations that on occasion need immediate assistance. When a public event is coming up, Pat helps to move tables, chairs, exhibit cases and frequently suggests new approaches when a large class visit, or a new exhibit is being planned.

Once, when a wedding was to take place in the 1923 Reading Room (the “Harry Potter Room”), he went as far as to clean and polish every single brass table lamp. Pat’s friendly personality and generous nature make it a privilege to work with him.

Teresa Touchette, Smith School of Business;

No job description could encompass all of the roles that Teresa Touchette plays in the lives of graduate students at the Smith School of Business. After 25 years in the Smith PhD-MSc Research office managing recruitment, admission, and graduation process, Teresa knows the answer to almost every question. Teresa cares passionately about the school being able to attract the best applicants. She works tirelessly to promptly respond to every question she receives. Over the course of an application cycle, this involves literally thousands of email exchanges with hundreds of applicants. She ensures that they are not left waiting in the dark about the status of their applications.

Teresa is often the first person that graduate students meet when they first arrive on campus. And she is with every student through every stage of their progression. When asked why they chose Smith for graduate work, students commonly credit Teresa’s personal interaction during the application process.

M. Yat Tse, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences;

As Manager, Research and Laboratories, in the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Dr. Yat Tse oversees the research infrastructure and laboratory space supporting the research programs of 56 faculty and 10 clinician scientists in Botterell Hall. This also includes about 150 graduate and postdoctoral trainees, 30 research technical staff, and numerous undergraduate research thesis and summer students.  

His is an enormous task, impacting millions of dollars in regional, provincial, national, and international funding. Yat also manages the undergraduate teaching laboratory operation in the School of Medicine Building that services hundreds of biochemistry, life sciences, and medical students. Through all of this, he interacts with his team members and others with the ease of a natural leader, demonstrating patience and compassion.

Yat, who has a BSc and PhD in Chemistry from Queen’s, is also an innovative and meticulous investigator and has authored or co-authored 47 peer-reviewed research manuscripts.

Heather Wolsey, Queen’s Archives;

For 32 years, Heather Wolsey has been an invaluable member of the Queen’s Archives team. Her job description does not fully describe the impact her work has on the unit. The conservator, archivists, and now, librarians, are constantly adding to her workload as more materials are added to the collection, requiring her attention and subsequent treatment. Because of her eagerness to learn and expand her skills, Heather is now an experienced handler and preserver of multiple forms of fragile media, such as architectural drawings, sound recordings, letter books and ledgers, glass plate and nitrate negatives. Heather is now responsible for expanding the Archives’ collection of university artifacts, much loved by student organizations and alumni.

Heather also steered a long-term project that involved culling and processing records in the vaults, resulting in freeing up about 500 metres of shelf space, enabling the Archives to continue to fulfill its acquisition mandate.

Larke Zarichny, Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering;

If you were a student in Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering during the last 37 years, it is very likely that Larke Zarichny knows you by name. She also knows your spouse’s and your children’s names. Larke is unfailingly friendly and helpful to all. She is one of the main reasons that the department is well known for its welcoming atmosphere. This, in turn, has translated into perennial high rates of student success and satisfaction.

Known as the “heart” of the Queen’s geology community, Larke makes students feel welcome and included and provides them with support that they need to succeed. International students say she is the best Queen’s employee they have met so far; when homesickness strikes, she is always there for them. With her deep knowledge of the processes in the faculties of Arts and Science an Engineering and Applied Science, Larke can get just about anything done.

A fitting tribute

Queen's EngChoir debuts new choral piece commemorating victims of École Polytechnique massacre.

[EngChoir]
The EngChoir will debut a new choral piece at the National Day of Action to Prevent Violence Against Women. (Supplied Photo)

In a special tribute, the Queen's University EngChoir is debuting a new choral piece at the National Day of Action to Prevent Violence Against Women. The memorial on Dec. 6 commemorates the 14 lives lost at the 1989 École Polytechnique massacre. Of the women who died that day, 12 were engineering students.

Fourth-year engineering student and EngChoir Director of Performance Monet Slinowsky worked with Canadian composer David W. Roe and Canadian poet Grace Butler Difalco to write the choral piece Chrysalides. For Slinowsky, the song has very deep meaning.

“It represents the women that died during the massacre as the pupa in a cocoon just before it emerges as a beautiful butterfly,” she explains. “These women will never have the chance to spread their wings to become butterflies. The chance was stolen from them.”

Slinowsky met Dr. Roe through a Facebook community for choir leaders. The retired high school music teacher whose compositions have been performed across North America contacted her and asked if he could compose a song for the event. He also suggested he could collaborate with Difalco as he had worked with her in the past.

Difalco is the author of three books of poetry and her one poem Keepers of the Light was set to music and performed for Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip during their 1997 visit to Newfoundland.

“When I first heard it, I thought it was beautiful and it has really resonated with the choir,” Slinowsky says. “We’ve been working hard to learn the piece and everyone has been very motivated. We are now putting on the final touches.”

The public is welcome at the memorial service Thursday, Dec. 6 starting at 1 pm in Beamish-Munro Hall.

Queen’s remembers Mark Heeler

Director of strategic planning and partnerships for the Canadian Cancer Trials Group and former executive director of the Office of the Principal died on Dec. 1.

The Queen’s community is mourning the passing of Mark Heeler, who died Saturday, Dec. 1 following a seven-month battle with cancer.

[Mark Heeler]Dr. Heeler held a series of positions at Queen’s University including assistant dean at the Faculty of Law, executive director of the Office of the Principal, and, most recently, director of strategic planning and partnerships for the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG), a position he held since 2014.

The impact of initiatives Mark led and the relationships he created will extend well beyond the all too short time he spent with us,” says Janet Dancey, CCTG Director.We are grateful to have had the opportunity to work with him and to benefit from his skills and experience.”

From 2008 to 2014, Dr. Heeler played an important role in the Office of the Principal, working directly with former principal Tom Williams and current Principal Daniel Woolf. He was chosen as the director of the Special Projects, Strategic Policy and Programs Division of the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU), at the time making him the first university executive chosen for an MTCU executive exchange, lasting six months, in more than 15 years.

“Mark was a key figure in the Principal’s Office throughout my first term,” says Principal Woolf. “I relied on his fearless advice, his political acumen, and his ability to get things done efficiently. He remained a close friend well after his departure from our office for CCTG. Mark had the better part of a career still in front of him, and it is terrible that this, and his life, have been cut so short. Julie and I send our deepest condolences to his wife Lynnette and his children.”

Dr. Heeler started his career as a constable with the Ontario Provincial Police before obtaining a doctoral degree from Osgoode Hall Law School. He would then work with the National Judicial Institute in Ottawa before moving to Queen’s in 2005.

Dr. Heeler was the beloved husband of Lynnette and loving father of Evan and Ella.

Flags on campus will be lowered on Friday, Dec. 7. A memorial service will be held on the same day at James Reid Funeral Home, 1900 John Counter Blvd., at 2 pm, with a reception to follow in the James Reid Reception Centre.

For those who wish to honour Dr. Heeler’s memory, donations may be made to the War Amps of Canada, Child Amputee (CHAMP) program.

 

Homecoming 2019 dates announced

Alumni will return to Queen's and Kingston for Homecoming on Oct. 18-20.

  • [Homecoming 2018 Parade]
    The Homecoming parade, led by Queen's Bands, starts off from Grant Hall as part of the Homecoming 2018 celebrations.
  • [Homecoming 2018]
    A group of Faculty of Arts and Science alumnae from the Class of 1993 gather for a photo during Homecoming on Queen's campus.
  • [Homecoming 2018 Parade]
    Queen's alumni and students join the Homecoming parade from Grant Hall to Richardson Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 20.
  • [Homecoming 2018]
    Members of the Tricolour Guard take to the field during the halftime parade for the Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 20.

Queen’s Homecoming 2019 will take place Oct. 18-20.

The university will be welcoming alumni from classes ending in 4 or 9, as well as all Queen’s Tricolour Guard who are celebrating 50 or more years since their graduation (Class of 1969).

Students graduating in 2019 are also invited to celebrate their first Homecoming as alumni and mark the occasion of their “Reunion-Zero.”

Homecoming weekend will feature a wide selection of events, including a football game against the York Lions at Richardson Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 19 at 1 pm.

The university is working closely with alumni, students, staff, faculty and city partners to confirm programming and event details.

“Homecoming is a special event for the university as it brings together past and present students, friends, and supporters to celebrate Queen’s and what it means to be part of such a great community,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “To help prepare for Homecoming’s many events we continue to collaborate closely with our community partners to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone.”

Visit the Homecoming page for event updates. For more information, contact the Reunions Office by email or call 1-800-267-7837.

Faculties, departments, schools, and groups planning Homecoming 2019 events or activities are encouraged to contact the Reunions team for assistance in promotions, outreach to alumni, and to engage student volunteers to help support your plans.

In 2018, 3,346 alumni returned to Queen’s and Kingston for Homecoming, showing a municipal economic impact assessment of $2.1 million. 

Camp policies/procedures posted for review and feedback

Members of the Queen’s community can review and offer feedback on several draft policies/procedures recently updated by the university.

The list of updated policies/procedures includes:

The University Secretariat and Legal Counsel asks the Queen’s community to submit feedback via email to policies@queensu.ca by Tuesday, Dec. 18 at 4 pm. 

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