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Museum of Anatomy open house June 15

The Museum of Anatomy at the Queen’s School of Medicine will open its doors to the public for free tours during its annual open house on Saturday June 15.

Each year, hundreds of students from Queen’s and nearby high schools use the materials in the museum to learn about the structure of the human body. The open house will make this same educational experience available to anyone who is interested.

Visitors must register for tours ahead of time, as space is limited. The first tour begins at 9:20 am.

At the museum, visitors will be able to view the large collection of anatomical objects that Queen’s has collected over several decades. Organized by anatomical regions, the museum contains multiple samples of almost all parts of the human body.

Most of the objects are displayed in jars filled with a preservative fluid, but some have been plastinated. These items, including a number of hearts and bones, can sit out in the air and are able to be touched. By feeling the specimens and turning them over in their hands, students often notice details that are difficult to observe otherwise.

At past open houses, according to Dr. Leslie MacKenzie, Director of the Pattern II M.Sc. program in Anatomical Sciences, visitors have expressed their enthusiasm for the chance to have such an in-depth and detailed look at the human body. Some visitors have been so moved that they have gone on to volunteer for the Human Body Donor Program. All the anatomical specimens on display at the museum are collected from donors who chose to donate their remains to Queen’s. These donations are incredibly meaningful gifts to the school and help us fulfill our research and educational goals. To show respect for the people who have donated their bodies, Queen’s holds a burial service each spring at the Cataraqui Cemetery. The families of the donors are invited to attend.

Faculty members and graduate students from Queen’s will be in the museum on June 15 to introduce people to the space, guide them, and answer any questions they might have about the collection. 

A long-overdue degree and hope for our future

[Bartholomew degree]
Dean Richard Reznick and Chancellor Jim Leech celebrate with members of the Bartholomew family. 

This article was first published on the Faculty of Health Sciences Dean’s Blog.

On Thursday, May 23 the School of Nursing and the School of Medicine held their convocation ceremony, and those of us on the faculty had the joy of seeing our tremendous graduates receive their new degrees. Convocation is always a meaningful occasion, but this year’s stands out because we had the opportunity to grant a posthumous degree to Ethelbert Bartholomew.

Ethelbert should have been granted this degree 100 years ago, but the 1918 policy that banned Black medical students from Queen’s took away his opportunity to receive the degree he deserved.

You may remember that last month Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf and I signed a public letter of apology for this ban. Ethelbert’s son, Daniel Bartholomew, traveled to Kingston from Whitby to attend this apology ceremony, and I was grateful that he was able to be there.

Afterwards, at a dinner marking the occasion, Daniel looked at me and said: “There’s one more thing I’m wondering if you could do. Could you give my dad his degree?”

Now, this sounded like a great idea to me, but I was somewhat taken aback by this simple yet profound request. So, being a polite dean, I told him I would see what I could do. Granting a degree is a complicated process, and it isn’t something I could just do on my own. Even if it were possible, I was afraid that it might take a long time. Universities, you might know, don’t exactly move at lightning speed.

So that evening, I spoke to Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney and she said “we can do this!”

The next day I spoke to our Director of Diversity Mala Joneja and she said “we can do this!”

To my great thrill, everyone at Queen’s jumped into action with great commitment to granting this degree. Processes that would normally take us a year got finished within a month. Daniel Bartholomew asked for this degree in April, and we were able to confer it in May.

Dr. Maria Bartholomew and Rosalind Bartholomew accept the Doctor of Medicine degree for Ethelbert Bartholomew from Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Alex Da Silva. (University Communications)

Conferring this degree was made all the more meaningful by the fact that Daniel and other members of Ethelbert’s family came to Kingston to attend convocation. Two of Ethelbert’s descendants even agreed to accept the degree on his behalf: Dr. Maria Bartholomew, his great niece, and Rosalind Bartholomew, his granddaughter.

I am so grateful to all the members of the Bartholomew family who joined us for convocation. Handing Ethelbert’s long-overdue degree to Maria and Rosalyn will stay with me as one of the most meaningful moments in my time as dean. I am also grateful to PhD candidate, Edward Thomas, for his incredible and diligent work in unearthing many of the details of this story through his research.

The ban of 1918 is certainly a sad moment from our past, but, as I stood in front of our new graduates, I felt immense hope for our future. When it comes to embracing diversity, the class of 2019 is light years ahead of where we were, as a society, in 1918. Undoubtedly, they are even light years ahead of my generation.

It’s thrilling to see the ways in which they have all embraced inclusivity in the classroom, around campus, and in the hospital. For this generation, the drive to promote equity and diversity is part of who they are as people. And I know that they will all continue to work to make Canada a more equitable society as they embark on the next stage of their careers.

Dean Reznick thanks Andrew Willson for his assistance in preparing this blog.

Queen’s bans smoking, vaping, and tobacco

University’s Canadian campuses and properties go smoke-free on June 1, 2019.

Aerial view of Queen's main campus.
The Queen's Smoke-Free University Policy was approved by the Vice-Principals’ Operations Committee in April 2019.

Spring air on campus will be even fresher next month, as a new policy prohibiting smoking, vaping, and tobacco use on Queen’s University’s Canadian properties takes effect on June 1, 2019.

“The health and well-being of everyone on the Queen’s campus are of utmost importance to me, and to the entire senior university administration,” said Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, when the policy was announced in April 2019. “We want our community members to feel their best – and living, working, and studying in a smoke-free environment is a key step toward that goal.”

The policy applies to students, faculty, staff, contractors, visitors and all others on university property, and prohibits smoking of any substance in any manner, and use of all tobacco products. Allowances for Indigenous use of traditional medicines, approved teaching and research, and prescribed medical cannabis will be made available.

Queen’s offers assistance to both students and employees seeking smoking cessation supports. Details are available at the Cessation Resources section on the Smoke-Free Queen’s FAQ.

Learn more about the Queen’s Smoke-Free University Policy, property boundaries, and available resources.

Getting ready for Homecoming

Homecoming 2019 is set to take place Oct. 18-20.

As a part of Homecoming coordination each year, the Reunions Team creates a centralized registration system. We aim to offer a ‘one-stop-shop’ for alumni to register and pay (where applicable) for the various events being organized by campus groups. 

Homecoming is a great opportunity to engage the alumni of your faculty/school/department/division, build lasting connections, and share what’s new in your area – alumni want to connect with you!

The Reunions Team also maintains an online Schedule of Events, which gets more than 11,000 unique pageviews in the month of Homecoming, as well as produces 2,500 printed program booklets, which are handed out at the Meet & Greet event during Homecoming weekend. 

If your faculty/school/department/division is interested in planning an event for Homecoming, or already has plans underway, The Reunions Team would love to integrate it into our system and support your efforts to run a successful event. Our team is also here to help with logistics advice, communication to alumni, and promotion of your event to class volunteers planning their reunions.  

Homecoming registration will go live on June 21.

Don’t hesitate to reach out if you’d like to work with our team.

The Reunions Team
reunions@queensu.ca
1-800-267-7837

Queen’s remembers Mabel Corlett

Members of the Queen’s community are remembering Mabel Corlett who passed away on April 14. She was 80.

In 1960, Dr. Corlett became the first woman to obtain a B.Sc. in geology from Queen’s University. After obtaining her Master’s and PhD at the University of Chicago, she returned to Queen’s to teach mineralogy. In doing so, she also became the first female professor in the department, where she would teach for 17 years.

Flags on campus were lowered in her memory on Saturday, May 11.

An obituary is available online.

Queen’s remembers Mary Owens

Members of the Queen’s community are remembering Mary Owens, a staff member of the School of Nursing.

Mary passed away on April 4 at the age of 63 following a short battle with cancer.

Along with her family she is dearly missed by her colleagues at the School of Nursing who provided loving support to her especially in her weeks of illness. Mary accepted her diagnosis and maintained a positive attitude and a sense of humor until the end. She showed us what dying with dignity was about. 

Flags on campus were lowered in her memory on Monday, May 27.

Queen’s honours Shelagh Rogers

  • Shelagh Rogers hooded
    Shelagh Rogers is hooded by David Saunders, Dean of Smith School of Business, while Chancellor Jim Leech looks on, during the fourth ceremony of Spring Convocation. (Photo by Lars Hagberg/ University Communications)
  • Shelagh Rogers addresses convocation
    Shelagh Rogers addresses the graduating students at Grant Hall after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's University on Friday, May 24. (Photo by Lars Hagberg/ University Communications)
  • Students leave Kingston Hall
    Students exit Kingston Hall and make their way to Grant Hall for the fourth ceremony of Spring Convocation at Queen's University. (Photo by Lars Hagberg/ University Communications)
  • Families and friends at Grant Hall
    Families and friends try to take photos of their graduating students from the balcony of Grant Hall during the Spring Convocation ceremony on Friday afternoon. (Photo by Lars Hagberg/ University Communications)
  • MBA graduates
    Two graduates of the Master of Business Administration program at Smith School of Business are hooded during the 1 pm convocation ceremony.
  • MBA graduates
    Graduates of the Smith School of Business Master of Business Administration program fill Grant Hall for the third ceremony of Spring Convocation.

Grant Hall was a busy place on  Friday, May 24, as Day 2 of Spring Convocation featured three ceremonies.

A highlight of the day was the conferring of an honorary degree upon Shelagh Rogers (Artsci’77), an award-winning Canadian broadcast journalist and the 11th chancellor of the University of Victoria. 

Rogers is best known for her work with the CBC and is currently the host and producer of CBC Radio One’s The Next Chapter. She got her start in broadcasting at CFRC, the campus radio station of Queen’s University, while she earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History.

Queen’s is presenting a total of seven honorary degrees during convocation.

The next two ceremonies will be held on Monday, June 3. Overall, a total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation, with the final one being held Wednesday, June 12.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

More photos can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Summer student services on campus

Programs and services for students, staff and faculty continue through the summer.

While many students leave campus for the summer term, there are still many programs and services available through the Division of Student Affairs for students, as well as faculty and staff.

The Athletics & Recreation Centre (ARC) is open Monday to Thursday 6 am to 9 pm, Friday 6 am to 7 pm, and weekends 8 am to 6 pm. Summer fitness programs start the week of July 8. To register, visit www.gogaelsgo.com/fitness. The main entrance to the ARC is currently undergoing a major renovation project. Access to the ARC is only be available through the ARC South entrance in Mitchell Hall. All workout areas remain open.

Hospitality Services is running summer hours of operation for some retail food outlets. The full schedule is available online. The popular $5 Friday BBQ for staff and faculty resumed on May 3, and will continue all summer from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm outside of Mackintosh-Corry Hall. 

Student Wellness Services is open Monday to Friday from 9 am to 4:30 pm for booked appointments and summer workshops, including Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training and safeTALK. Evening and walk-in service will resume in September, when SWS will have moved to its new location on the ground floor of Mitchell Hall.

Career Services is operating Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Drop-in student advising hours will continue Monday to Thursday, 1:30 pm to 3:30 pm. In-person booked appointments with career counsellors are available all summer, and for students living outside of Kingston, Career Services provides Skype and phone appointments. Experiential Learning workshops are also available for students working or volunteering on campus, and for faculty or staff who supervise students. For more information and to book an appointment, visit the Career Services website.

Student Academic Success Services (SASS) is open Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. One-on-one in-person and online writing appointments are available Tuesdays-Thursdays until the end of July. SASS continues to provide English as an Additional Language (EAL) support, and one-on-one EAL appointments will be available until the end of June. To book an appointment, visit the SASS website.

The School of Graduate Studies is open Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm.  In collaboration with SASS, the School of Graduate Studies is offering a Dissertation Bootcamp in May and a weekly Grad Writing Lab on Thursday mornings. Additionally, the school coordinates The Lake Shift, a six-day writing retreat for Ontario doctoral students in July at Queen’s University Biology Station at Lake Opinicon and Dissertation on the Lake, a five-day writing retreat just for Queen’s graduate students at Elbow Lake in August. These writing retreats allow graduate students to make significant progress to their theses. To learn more, visit the School of Graduate Studies Expanding Horizons website.

Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC) will maintain its regular hours of operation, Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. The QUIC space in Mitchell Hall is air conditioned and has a ping-pong table that students can use throughout the summer. QUIC will also be hosting many events and groups, including a Walk to the Farmer’s Market every Thursday and Lunch Club Mondays. To learn more, visit QUIC’s website.

The Ban Righ Centre will continue to be open Monday to Friday from 9 am to 4 pm, but will be closed the week of July 15. Mature women students are encouraged to drop in to the centre for academic, personal and financial support. There will also be a weekly meditation session held Wednesdays at 12 pm throughout the summer. For more information, visit the Ban Righ Centre website.

The Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre will continue to operate Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. All services are available to students, including cultural counselling, cultural safety training, admissions and transition support and webinars. Four Directions will also be holding the Kairos Blanket Exercise and Land Acknowledgment workshops over the summer. For more information, visit the Four Directions website and Facebook page.

The Donald Gordon Conference Centre is a year-round destination for overnight accommodations, dining services, and meeting and conference space. This summer they will be hosting several public events, including a three-part magic show series presented by Kingston Magic Theatre. For more information about upcoming events and services, visit the Donald Gordon Conference Centre website.

Queen’s Housing and Ancillary Services is now offering summer accommodations until Aug. 24 in residence buildings across campus. This is the largest summer accommodation program in Kingston, with more than 25,000 guest room nights are expected to be booked. For more information, including pricing and booking, visit the Summer Accommodations website.

Queen’s rights a wrong as Spring Convocation kicks off

  • Daniel Bartholomew listens to Richard Rexnick
    Daniel Bartholomew, the son of Ethelbert Bartholomew, who was affected by the 1918 ban on admission of Black students to the medical school at Queen’s, listens to Richard Reznick, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences.
  • Bartholomew family look at degree
    Dr. Maria Bartholomew and Rosalind Bartholomew hand the posthumous Doctor of Medicine for Ethelbert Bartholomew to his son Daniel, during Thursday's convocation ceremony in Grant Hall.
  • Presentation of degree to Bartholomew family
    The family of Ethelbert Bartholomew take to the stage at Grant Hall to receive his Doctor of Medicine from Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Alex Da Silva.
  • Bartholomew family members
    Dr. Maria Bartholomew, Daniel Bartholomew and Rosalind Bartholomew hold the Doctor of Medicine conferred posthumously to Ethelbert Bartholomew, who was affected by the 1918 ban on admission of Black students to the medical school at Queen’s
  • Daniel Bartholomew
    Daniel Bartholomew gives a thumb's up as he reaches out to Edward Thomas (Sc'06, MASc'12), who researched the expulsion of Black medical students in 1918.
  • Blanket awarding to School of Medicine student
    An Indigenous graduate of the School of Medicine receives a blanket from Laura Maracle, Indigenous Cultural Safety Coordinator, during Thursday's convocation ceremony.
  • Family celebrates PhD graduate
    Family members celebrate as a loved one receives her doctoral degree during the convocation ceremony for the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing at Grant Hall.
  • Parents hood School of Medicine graduate
    A graduate of the School of Medicine is hooded by her parents as Tony Sanfilippo, Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education, and Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf, look on.
  • Jenny Medves
    Director of the School of Nursing and Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences Jenny Medves speaks to the graduands and their families and friends at Thursday's convocation ceremony.

Spring Convocation started on Thursday with the first ceremony being held at Grant Hall.

The afternoon event saw graduates of the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing cross the stage, as their friends, families, and loved ones looked on.

The ceremony was also a special event for the university, the Faculty of Health Sciences, and the family of Ethelbert Bartholomew.

An upper-year student whose medical career was abruptly ended in 1918 by a ban on admission of Black students to the medical school at Queen’s, Bartholmew was posthumously conferred a Doctor of Medicine degree on Thursday, which was accepted by members of his family.

In April, the university signed an official letter of apology, acknowledging the institution’s past racist actions and repeated failures to hold itself accountable.

Three more ceremonies will be held on Friday at 10 am, 1 pm, and 4 pm. At the 4 pm ceremony, award-winning Canadian broadcast journalist and Chancellor of the University of Victoria, Shelagh Rogers, will receive the first of seven honorary degrees being handed out by Queen’s at convocation.

Overall, a total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation, with the final one being held Wednesday, June 12. The first 14 will be held at Grant Hall, while the final four will be hosted at the Athletics and Recreation Centre Main Gym.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

More photos can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Spring Convocation 2019

Starting Thursday, May 23 and finishing Wednesday, June 12, a total of 18 ceremonies are being held for Spring Convocation at Queen’s University. The first 14 will held at Grant Hall while the final four will be hosted at the Athletics and Recreation Centre Main Gym.

Live ceremony feeds will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each ceremony. The full schedule of the ceremonies is available online.

More information about Convocation at Queen's is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

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