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Preparing incoming first-year students

The Summer Orientation to Academics and Resources program connected incoming first-year students to resources across campus.

  • [The start of the SOAR day.]
    Incoming first-year students and their guests meet staff, instructors and each other at the start of the SOAR day.
  • [First-year students get to know each other at SOAR]
    First-year students get to know each other at SOAR.
  • [SOAR attendees had the opportunity to ask questions and meet student services staff, including peer representatives from the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, at the program’s resource fair.]
    SOAR attendees had the opportunity to ask questions and meet student services staff, including peer representatives from the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, at the program’s resource fair.
  • [The SOAR program includes a campus resource fair that included student services and the undergraduate student government, the Alma Mater Society.]
    The SOAR program includes a campus resource fair that included student services and the undergraduate student government, the Alma Mater Society.
  • [First-year students throw their ‘snowball’ containing a question to SOAR peer ambassadors as part of the program’s student-only session.]
    First-year students throw their ‘snowball’ containing a question to SOAR peer ambassadors as part of the program’s student-only session.

Two thousand incoming first-year students and family members are well prepared for the transition to Queen’s after attending the university’s Summer Orientation to Academics and Resources program this month.

The series of day-long campus events held July 6 to 14 provided incoming students and family members with the opportunity to learn more about academic expectations, learning strategies, resources, the campus, and common student transition issues. 

Participants listened to presentations from faculty, staff, and upper year students, learned about services and resources, toured residences, tried out the food, and had the chance to speak one-on-one with advisors from across campus.

"We heard from students and families that they felt relieved after getting help with course selection and talking to the chefs about meal plans and special diets or allergies, or to counsellors and doctors about support available on campus,” says Woo Kim, Manager, Student Experience Office. "Hearing from professors, academic advisors, and other great campus resources helped them see that there are so many supports for students on campus and even if they’ll be living away from home, they wouldn’t be alone. Students got to connect with peers in some of our student-specific sessions and some even made new friends!"

For students who couldn’t make it to SOAR, there are webinars on a range of topics being held all summer long, and a monthly online checklist of Next Steps.

For families in British Columbia and Calgary, Get Ready for Queen’s! events are being held in mid August.

Move-In Day is Saturday, September 1.

Faculty Orientation activities start September 2, and classes begin Thursday, September 5.

Developing tomorrow’s leaders today

[Emerging Leaders Program]
Participants in the Emerging Leaders Program work on a project together during a celebration event marking their graduation. (Univeristy Communications)

The most recent graduates of the Emerging Leaders Program were celebrated recently with a special event hosted at Goodes Hall.

Developed and administered by Queen’s Organizational Development and Learning, Human Resources, the Emerging Leaders Program is aimed at providing new and future managers with the practical tools, support, and resources they need to perform their jobs effectively and confidently.

[Emerging Leaders Program]
The Emerging Leaders Program is aimed at providing new and future managers with the practical tools, support, and resources they need to perform their jobs effectively and confidently. (University Communications)

This year’s cohort, the fourth for the program, featured 36 participants from a wide range of departments and faculties across the university.

“Seeing the continued participation in the Emerging Leaders Program, with such diverse backgrounds including the Four Directions Aboriginal Centre and the International Office this year, is really encouraging,” says Shannon Hill, Learning and Development Specialist, Queen‘s Human Resources. “The program addresses university-wide goals and vision for talent management, promoting internal talent, increased collaboration across departments and units, and supporting diversity and inclusion initiatives.”

The program was created to harness and share the leadership skills and experiences gained by graduates of the Foundational Leadership Program  to the benefit of the university. As current managers, Foundational Leadership graduates act as mentors to the Emerging Leaders Program, creating the training framework for professional development to support new and future leaders as well as continuing the learning for experienced managers. To date 12 Emerging Leaders Program graduates have gone on to participate in the Foundational Leadership Program.

Through seven full-day training sessions, held over a period of seven months, the Emerging Leaders Program provides Queen’s-specific training for management level staff, while also enabling participants to establish professional networks and acquire practical skills. Module topics include: Making the Leap to Management; Essential Skills for Managing; and Managing in a Diverse Environment.

More information about the Emerging Leaders Program is available on the Human Resources website.

Welcoming new faculty

New faculty members and their families gathered to meet their peers at a special welcome barbecue.

  • Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris speaks with recently-arrived faculty members during a special welcome event at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris speaks with recently-arrived faculty members during a special welcome event at the University Club. (University Communications)
  • Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science Barbara Crow talks about the opportunities that are available not only at Queen's, but also within the Kingston community. (University Communications)
    Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science Barbara Crow talks about the opportunities that are available not only at Queen's, but also within the Kingston community. (University Communications)
  • Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), speaks with a group of new faculty members on Friday, July 13 during a welcome barbecue at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), speaks with a group of new faculty members on Friday, July 13 during a welcome barbecue at the University Club. (University Communications)
  • Faculty members who have recently arrived at Queen's University introduce themselves during a welcome event Friday at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Faculty members who have recently arrived at Queen's University introduce themselves during a welcome event Friday at the University Club. (University Communications)

Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris hosted a welcome barbecue for new faculty and their families at the University Club. They had an opportunity to meet new colleagues from across the university as well as members of the university administration.   

“Queen’s is pleased to welcome our new faculty. We hope that the opportunity to meet one another in a less formal setting, will help them establish friendships and professional connections both for them and their families,” says Dr. Harris.

Principal Daniel Woolf identified faculty renewal as a high priority for reinvestment by the university in support of our academic mission. The five-year renewal plan will see 200 new faculty hired.

A focus on global health and rehabilitation

Queen’s International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) hosts first tri-university conference on global health and rehabilitation.

[Conference Executive Committee]
Some of the members of the conference’s Executive Committee, formed by members of Queen’s University, the University of Toronto, and McGill University. (Photo credit: Atul Jaiswal)

The first global health and rehabilitation conference run collaboratively between Queen’s University, the University of Toronto, and McGill University took place this weekend at Queen’s.

Scholars from the three participating universities and beyond came together for the Future Leaders in Global Health and Rehabilitation Conference 2018. They tackled global topics such as human rights, equity promotion, and global health research competencies.

“This is a first of its kind collaboration between the three disability- and rehabilitation-focused research centres, and may act as a stepping stone for larger engagement among students and faculty in global health research,” says Heather Aldersey, Director of the International Centre for the Advancement of Community-Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “Giving students and junior scholars a chance to connect with others interested in this field is a fantastic opportunity for them to share, learn and grow, and we were happy to host the first conference at Queen’s.”

The three centres that organized in the conferences included ICACBR, the International Centre for Disability and Rehabilitation at the University of Toronto, and the Global Health and Rehabilitation Initiative (GHRI) at McGill University. Community engagement funding from the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program supported the event. Many of the executive organizing committee members were Queen Elizabeth Scholars from low- and middle-income countries.

Students from disciplines such as law, engineering, social work, and geography joined health and rehabilitation students to discuss how to build capacity for global health research competencies, share the activities underway at each centre, and plan for future collaborations.

“This tri-university event provided a wonderful opportunity for the ICACBR to share how and what it has contributed to the developing and developed world in the global health and rehabilitation field,” says Atul Jaiswal, Executive Committee Member for the conference and doctoral candidate with the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “Bringing three leading centres on this discipline together creates opportunities to collaborate and do much more than one centre can do on its own.”

The ICACBR began in 1991 with a mandate to advance the development of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) internationally. Since then, Queen’s has spearheaded CBR, disability, and global health initiatives in over 15 countries in Central and South America, Central and Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Asia-Pacific Region.

To learn more about ICACBR and their work within the School of Rehabilitation at Queen’s, visit their website.

 

Changes to executive team take effect

Four newly appointed leaders begin their terms in the Provost’s Office, Advancement, Research, and Graduates Studies.

Along with being Canada’s official birthday, July 1 is also the date that academic appointments typically begin on university campuses. This year at Queen’s, the day marked the start of several new appointments to the university’s executive leadership team.

Following announcements earlier this year, two new leaders are joining Queen’s, while two familiar and experienced leaders at the university are moving into new roles.

[Tom Harris]

Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), recently completed eight and a half years as vice-principal (Advancement). He succeeds Benoit-Antoine Bacon, now president and vice-chancellor of Carleton University. Dr. Harris will oversee the progress of the university’s strategic priorities, including enhancing indigeneity, diversity and inclusion on campus, supporting the hiring of 200 new faculty over five years as part of faculty renewal, implementing our internationalization strategy, promoting research and innovation, and completing  Mitchell Hall – the Innovation and Wellness Centre. Dr. Harris is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering.

 

[Kimberly Woodhouse]

Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research), brings with her a decade of deanship and experience in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science as a professor to her new role. She is also a professional engineer, has extensive experience in the private sector, as well as with the Canadian granting councils. Succeeding John Fisher, Dr. Woodhouse will provide leadership to the broader research portfolio and clarify the growing relationship between research and innovation at Queen’s and the resources required to support it.

 

[Karen Bertrand]

Karen Bertrand, Vice-Principal (Advancement), brings her successful track record as associate vice-president, major gift advancement, from the University of Guelph. Succeeding Dr. Harris in the role, she will continue the close relationship between Queen’s and alumni, donors, and friends to ensure that the university remains a premier destination for students and faculty, both across Canada and internationally.

 

 

[Fahim Quadir]

Fahim Quadir, Vice-Provost and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, begins his five-year term fresh from York University, where he worked as the interim dean and associate vice-president in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and as a professor of Development Studies and Social Science. Dr. Quadir will provide strategic direction, academic planning leadership, and administrative oversight to the School of Graduates Studies to achieve the highest possible standards in graduate education and research.

 

“On behalf of the Queen’s community, I’d like to welcome each new member to the executive team, and Dr. Harris to his new role. I’m looking forward to the work we will be doing together to achieve the university’s top strategic priorities and build on the significant momentum already underway,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Good things are happening at Queen’s. Our enrollment numbers are impressive, we have the highest undergraduate graduation rate in the country, our faculty renewal initiative is in full swing, we have renewed energy and enthusiasm around research and innovation, we are delivering financially sustainable budgets each year, and we have record-breaking donor support through the recent 10-year Initiatives Campaign.”  

For more information on the overall leadership team, visit the Queen’s administration and governance web page.

Concrete ideas for the future

Queen’s University civil engineering researchers design and build Canada’s first Moving Load Simulator for highway bridge testing.

  • Amir Fam, the Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science, explains how the Moving Load Simulator to Mayor Bryan Paterson. (University Communications)
    Amir Fam, the Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science, explains how the Moving Load Simulator to Mayor Bryan Paterson. (University Communications)
  • Among those attending the unveiling of the Moving Load Simulator were, from left: Kimberly Woodhouse, Vice-Principal (Research); Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science; Laura Tauskela, student; Mark Gerretsen, MP, Kingston and the Islands; Dustin Brennan, student; Bryan Paterson, Mayor of Kingston; and Amir Fam, Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science. (University Communications)
    Among those attending the unveiling of the Moving Load Simulator were, from left: Kimberly Woodhouse, Vice-Principal (Research); Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science; Laura Tauskela, student; Mark Gerretsen, MP, Kingston and the Islands; Dustin Brennan, student; Bryan Paterson, Mayor of Kingston; and Amir Fam, Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science. (University Communications)
  • The Moving Load Simulator, a one-of-a-kind system that simulates the forces borne by a bridge when large and small vehicles drive across, undergoes a demonstration during its unveiling at Ellis Hall. (University Communications)
    The Moving Load Simulator, a one-of-a-kind system that simulates the forces borne by a bridge when large and small vehicles drive across, undergoes a demonstration during its unveiling at Ellis Hall. (University Communications)
  • Queen’s University researcher Amir Fam and his team have designed and built the Moving Load Simulator, featuring new technology to test structural integrity of bridge materials and design. (University Communications)
    Queen’s University researcher Amir Fam and his team have designed and built the Moving Load Simulator, featuring new technology to test structural integrity of bridge materials and design. (University Communications)
  • A total of $4.2 million in funding to design and build the simulator – the first of its kind in Canada – and other support infrastructure was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Research Fund and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with additional in-kind contributions. (University Communications)
    A total of $4.2 million in funding to design and build the simulator – the first of its kind in Canada – and other support infrastructure was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Research Fund and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with additional in-kind contributions. (University Communications)

Queen’s University researcher Amir Fam and his team unveiled a cutting-edge Moving Load Simulator on Thursday, July 12, featuring new technology designed to test structural integrity of bridge materials and design.

The one-of-a-kind system simulates the forces borne by a bridge when large and small vehicles drive across. It collects data which are then analyzed by engineers to assess the performance of all aspects of the bridge structure, including the deck, girders, joints, and connections of many types of bridges.

“This equipment here at Queen’s is remarkably unique,” says Dr. Fam, Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science and Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies). “We wanted to take the lead in understanding bridges under full-scale moving loads by creating testing infrastructure that was innovative and new. We accomplished that with this technology.”

The $4.2 million in funding to design and build the simulator – the first of its kind in Canada – and other support infrastructure was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Research Fund and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with additional in-kind contributions.

“The important research enabled by the Moving Load Simulator will save lives and reduce costs,” says Roseann O’Reilly Runte, President and CEO of CFI. “Aging infrastructure in bridges across North America can be a serious issue of safety and security. The ability to study simultaneously both load and motion will be key to building better bridges in the future and to knowing today which bridges should require load limits.”

Traditionally, bridge materials are tested using a pulsating technique that sees a large hammer-like instrument pounding the material repeatedly in the same spot. Dr. Fam says that, in reality, this isn’t how bridges are used in the real-world. By driving back and forth over the test material, the simulator recreates the forces bridges undergo every day and over a long period of time.

“We designed and built this new technology to give us deeper insights than we’ve ever had before,” says Dr. Fam. “The simulator gives us a more accurate estimate of material fatigue, which correlates to the service life of the bridge. This is critical knowledge we can now supply to the construction industry.”

The Ministry of Transportation (MTO), which owns and maintains the vast majority of bridges in the Province, is one of first partners that will be using the load simulator to test bridges in Ontario.  Dr. Fam says the technology will also contribute to more design efficiencies.

“In addition to our industry partners, the Moving Load Simulator will provide a unique opportunity for Queen’s students,” says Dr. Fam. “They are going to be exposed to one of the more unique research facilities in the world and will be able to use it for research projects.”

Dr. Fam worked closely with key players from the Structures Group in the Department of Civil Engineering, graduate students and also worked with industry partners, Dymech, Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute, and Forterra Engineering, to take this innovative facility from a vision to reality.

“The launch of the Moving Load Simulator is indicative of the highly advanced and applicable nature of research at Queen’s, and, importantly, of how strong collaborations, student engagement, and industry partnerships can work in synergy to address real-world challenges,” says Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). 

 

Opening the cupboard on food insecurity

A team of technological education students creates a space at Duncan McArthur Hall to share and pick up non-perishable food items.

[A team of technological education students create a space at Duncan McArthur Hall to share and pick up non-perishable food items.]
Technological education students, Daniel Troisi, Dante Reitano, Jordan Messier, and Krista McClean designed and built the Queen's Foodshare Cupboard so that  where Queen’s and Kingston community members can either pick up non-perishable food items when needed, or make a donation. (University Communications)  

A team of teacher candidates is helping reduce food insecurity in the community by creating the Queen’s Community Cupboard, which was unveiled recently at Duncan McArthur Hall.

Technological education students, Daniel Troisi, Dante Reitano, Jordan Messier, and Krista McClean designed and built the wood and glass cupboard where Queen’s and Kingston community members can either pick up non-perishable food items when needed, or make a donation.

Located on the south side of Student Street, next to the doors to Jean Royce Hall, the cupboard is accessible to all users of Duncan MacArthur Hall, including students from the Faculty of Education, the School of English, as well as any other visitors to the building.

 “What inspired this project is that, at its core, food insecurity isn’t always visible even for us who are attending post-secondary education and having the cupboard so close to the residence is also important,” says Mr. Troisi, the team lead. “The focus was to provide a space where items can be donated on a perpetual basis rather that once or twice a year.  Now this is something that is always on our minds and is always accessible.”

[Queen's Foodshare Cupboard is unveiled at Duncan McArthur Hall]
Team lead Daniel Troisi open the section of the Quen's Foodshare Cupboard reserved for school supplies to help out projects by teacher candidates. (University Communications)

The cupboard also has a section for school supplies to help out projects by teacher candidates.

Part of the technological education program curriculum, community-based projects are organized by teacher candidates to meet community needs.

“Technological Education is about designing and making products that meet the needs of a client. This community-based project is a way to bring that process to improvements in our community,” says Peter Chin, Associate Dean (Undergraduate Studies) and Coordinator of Technological Education. “Caring for others is also very consistent with what teaching and education is all about, so the two go hand in hand. I’m just happy that someone took up the idea and made it happen.”

Other community-based projects this year included a local lending library for West Park in Kingston and a Providence Care Pampering Day, where the students offered mini-manicures and hand massages to the residents of Providence Manor.

The project received funding from the Queen’s Experiential Learning Projects Fund and is supported by the Faculty of Education. 

Donations can be made at any time, by anyone. A list of recommended items  is available online.

Certificate programs offer meaningful development opportunities

A total of 85 staff members successfully completed one of the six certificates offered by Human Resources.

  • Dan Bradshaw, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources), speaks to the graduates of the certificates program during a special ceremony hosted at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Dan Bradshaw, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources), speaks to the graduates of the certificates program during a special ceremony hosted at the University Club. (University Communications)
  • Kim Gudlauski, Undergraduate Assistant at the Dan School of Drama and Music, receives a plaque for the Administrative Professionals at Queen's Certificate from Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources) Dan Bradshaw. (University Communications)
    Kim Gudlauski, Undergraduate Assistant at the Dan School of Drama and Music, receives a plaque for the Administrative Professionals at Queen's Certificate from Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources) Dan Bradshaw. (University Communications)
  • Alison Cummings,Training Coordinator, Organizational Development and Learning, Human Resources, organizes the graduation plaques ahead of the ceremony. (University Communications)
    Alison Cummings,Training Coordinator, Organizational Development and Learning, Human Resources, organizes the graduation plaques ahead of the ceremony. (University Communications)
  • Scott Ferguson of Physical Plant Services receives a plaque for completing the Administrative Professionals at Queen's Certificate from Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources) Dan Bradshaw. (University Communications)
    Scott Ferguson of Physical Plant Services receives a plaque for completing the Administrative Professionals at Queen's Certificate from Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources) Dan Bradshaw. (University Communications)
  • Kathryn Vilela, Alumni Officer with Volunteer Relations, is handed a plaque for completing the Administrative Professionals at Queen's Master Certificate from Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources) Dan Bradshaw. (University Communications)
    Kathryn Vilela, Alumni Officer with Volunteer Relations, is handed a plaque for completing the Administrative Professionals at Queen's Master Certificate from Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources) Dan Bradshaw. (University Communications)

Queen’s is dedicated to providing meaningful development opportunities for employees throughout their time at the university.

Key to the effort are the certificate programs offered by Human Resources, which recently hosted a graduation celebration to recognize the 85 staff members who completed one or more of the programs.

One of those graduates was Kim Gudlauski, Undergraduate Assistant at the Dan School of Drama and Music, who completed the Administrative Professionals @ Queen’s and Queen’s Volunteer Engagement certificates. Previously she had also completed the Certificate in Workplace Communications.

When she first arrived at Queen’s it was suggested that she take a look at the programs. As she reviewed the certificates she saw the value in the skills and learning opportunities on offer.

“I really enjoy going to each session as there is often an ‘A-ha’ moment in each of them,” Ms. Gudlauski explains. “Each certificate gave me something new to practice in my own workspace, whether it be dealing with difficult situations, or how to properly acknowledge someone for their efforts.”

This year a total of 85 staff members successfully completed one of the six certificates offered by Human Resources – Administrative Professionals at Queen's Certificate (APAQ), Administrative Professionals @ Queen's Master Certificate (APAQM), Certificate in International Perspectives (CIP), Certificate in Workplace Communications (CWC), From Diversity to Inclusion in the Workplace (DIW), and Queen's Volunteer Engagement Certificate (QVEC).

The certificate programs are designed to help employees achieve their professional goals. Human Resources worked with 14 departments and 42 facilitators to offer the programs.

“Our certificate programs help us connect with staff whose professional development often depends on the Learning Catalogue offerings, and also with talented colleagues from across campus who help facilitate many of our workshops,” says Marie Doherty, Director, Client Services and Organizational Development and Learning, Human Resources. “These partnerships allow for high-calibre training that is also cost-effective for the university. It’s great to hear the many positive stories from our graduates; we look forward to more Queen’s community members taking advantage of these valuable learning opportunities.”

In addition, Human Resources offers a wide range of professional development opportunities for employees to enhance their competencies and to build networks with fellow staff members across the university.

The Human Resources Learning Catalogue offers a variety of workshops and wellness programs that any Queen’s staff member can sign up for online. In the past year a total of 1,178 staff members attended the 80+ workshops, 23 fitness classes, as well as a variety of Lunch & Learn sessions.

The 2018-19 Learning Catalogue will be launched at the end of August; visit the Human Resources website to view a full list of offerings. 

Queen’s remembers Nancy Suzanne Reid Ossenberg

[Dr. Nancy Suzanne Reid Ossenberg]Nancy Suzanne Reid Ossenberg, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anatomy, died on June 23. Dr. Ossenberg retired from Queen’s in 1998 after 25 years of service. She remained in Kingston after retirement.  

Nancy was a beloved teacher of anatomy and a well-respected physical anthropologist. She contributed a significant body of research on human ethnogenesis and the migrations of humans to the North American continent.

Nancy also had a passion for music, playing fiddle and singing with groups in Kingston. She loved the beauty and simplicity of nature, and loved the many animals she had cared for over the years.

“Our hearts go out to Nancy’s family, friends, local musicians and all of her campus colleagues and former students who mourn her loss,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “She clearly had a positive and lasting impact on her students and all of those who knew her.” 

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, July 21 at 2 pm at Morgan Chapel in the Theological Hall At Queen’s. Following the service, a hooley will take place at the Renaissance Event Venue, 285 Queen St., Kingston; all musicians are invited to participate. 

Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to the Salvation Army, or to the charity of your choice. 

Volunteer position: Queen’s staff or faculty member-at-large, CFRC Radio

CFRC Radio is looking for a Queen’s staff or faculty member to sit on its board of directors. This volunteer position involves a time commitment of three to six hours per month. Board meetings are monthly, and usually weekday evenings. Board members are also asked to be involved in one or more of the following committees: finance and fundraising, marketing and outreach, grievance, human resources, and policy. A background in radio broadcasting is not required. To apply, please send a statement of interest to board@cfrc.ca by Friday, July 27 at 5 pm.

CFRC Radio is Canada's longest running campus-community radio station, broadcasting from Queen’s University campus since 1922. CFRC's programming is volunteer-created and supported, comprising a broad spectrum of musical and spoken-word shows. CFRC's mandate is to provide innovative and alternative radio programming that enriches and challenges the academic and cultural life of the Queen's University and Kingston communities, and to provide members with the opportunity to participate and gain skills and experience in the collective operation of a radio station whose programming and practices are not constrained by demands for profit. The board has representation from Queen's staff/faculty, AMS and SGPS, radio volunteers, and the Kingston community.

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