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Financial Sustainability

Grant will make Inuit art exhibition a reality

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre has received a substantial grant of $261,937 from the Museum Assistance Program (MAP) of the Department of Canadian Heritage, it was announced Friday.

[Norman Vorano]
Norman Vorano is the Queen’s National Scholar and Curator of Indigenous Art.

The grant, the largest received by the gallery from this source, will be allocated over a three-year period. It supports an extraordinary exhibition of graphite drawings under the title Drawing from the Past: Picturing Inuit Modernity in the North Baffin Region, 1964. The show will be featured at the Agnes in 2017, with a national tour to follow.

Created in partnership with the Canadian Museum of History and the Piqqusilirivvik Inuit Cultural Learning Facility in Clyde River, Nunavut, Drawing from the Past will examine a tumultuous era in the history of Canada’s Arctic through the display and interpretation of a unique collection of Inuit drawings made in 1964. The drawings, created by Inuit men and women from the North Baffin communities of Clyde River, Pond Inlet, and Arctic Bay, document the thoughts, apprehensions, memories and observations of Nunavummiut during a time of social upheaval. The pieces entered the collection of the Canadian Museum of History in 2014.

Norman Vorano, Queen’s National Scholar and Curator of Indigenous Art, will lead the project. The exhibition is the first effort to bring this collection to the public in 30 years. Dr. Vorano says the project represents a special opportunity.

“The partnership with Piqqusilirivvik will ensure an informed, culturally rich interpretive framework for presenting these drawings, and opens a new channel of engagement with Canada’s Aboriginal population,” he says. “Reflecting contemporary discussions in curatorial practice, the exhibition seeks a realignment of the relationship between Indigenous and settler perspectives on non‐Western art through an emphasis upon the intangible elements of visual arts — the stories, memories and voices associated with the drawings.”

Agnes Director Jan Allen points out that the cultural exchange embedded in Drawing from the Past takes the work of the gallery in a new direction.

“With the support of MAP and the help of our partners, these drawings — tangible traces of cross‐cultural encounter from half a century ago — will come to life through reflective interviews with the people of their community of origin,” she says. “In conceiving this project, Norman Vorano has cultivated a fresh collaborative approach that promises to be revelatory for all involved.”

In addition to his role at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Dr. Vorano is an assistant professor in the Department of Art at Queen’s University.

For more information, contact Diana Gore, administrative coordinator, at (613) 533.2190 or diana.gore@queensu.ca.

 

 

Queen’s releases 2014-15 financial statements

Queen’s financial statements for 2014-15 have now been posted online after being approved by the university’s Board of Trustees earlier this month.

The statements, which outline the university’s consolidated financial results for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2015, report a surplus of revenues over expenses of $61.9 million even as the university continues to face a number of financial challenges.

“The majority of the surplus is the result of strong investment returns in the university’s investment and endowment funds,” says Caroline Davis, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “There is a degree of volatility in the financial statements because of investment returns.  The markets performed very well over the fiscal year, but the university cannot count on such strong returns over the long term.”

The university’s pooled endowment fund returned 12 per cent during the fiscal year. A portion of the endowment fund, use of which is largely restricted by the wishes of donors, is paid out to fund operations while the remainder is reinvested to protect the long-term value of the portfolio.

“There is a degree of volatility in the financial statements because of investment returns.  The markets performed very well over the fiscal year, but the university cannot count on such strong returns over the long term.”

- Caroline Davis, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration)

The smaller pooled investment fund, which includes a range of research funds, trust accounts, and operating carry-forwards, returned 10 per cent for the year. Those returns provide important flexibility for the university to address strategic priorities.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), is responsible for the university’s budget process and says that apart from one-time items like investment returns, the 2014-15 fiscal year ended as expected.

“Through the annual budget process, the university is focused on managing its resources carefully in the face of financial challenges,” says Harrison. “Despite the positive result in 2014-15, the university continues to face an unsustainable pension plan with a $285 million solvency deficit, a $253-million deferred maintenance backlog, static or declining government grants and uncertainty around the outcome of the government’s review of the university funding formula.”

The university’s financial statements are available on the Financial Services website, while more information about the university’s budget process is available on the provost’s website.

ITS dials up cellphone reception

Cellphone reception inside campus buildings is improving as a result of a project led by Information Technology Services (ITS).

Working with ITS, Bell Mobility is installing new in-building antenna systems at several locations. While the technology is provided by Bell, customers of other carriers – Telus, Virgin and Koodo – will benefit from the upgrades. Queen’s is actively encouraging Rogers Wireless and Wind Mobile to provide their customers with this enhanced service, and both continue to investigate the option to connect to the system.

“The Queen’s community has come to rely on cellphones and smartphones on a daily basis to support their educational, business and personal needs. However, reliable service inside Queen’s buildings has been hit and miss because outdoor antenna systems have struggled to keep up with the density of devices in the downtown area and on main campus,” says Hugh Flemington, Project Lead. “We anticipate this project will reduce the number of times users experience dropped calls or can’t find a signal.”

ITS set the initial priorities for the multi-year project based on buildings that typically house or host a large number of people, as well as areas known to have poor cellphone reception. The new antenna system is operating in Goodes Hall, Stauffer Library, Queen’s Centre and Victoria Hall. Systems in Brant House, David C. Smith House and Watts Hall will be in service by the end of September.

In addition to main campus improvements, west campus will soon benefit from a new Bell antenna on John Orr Tower to relieve capacity issues in the neighbourhood on event and high-traffic days.

ITS will continue to consult with its advisory boards and get feedback from student groups and Residences as it determines sites for future installations.

University appoints new deputy provost

Teri Shearer, an associate professor at Smith School of Business, has been appointed deputy provost, effective Jan. 1, 2016. 

[Teri Shearer]
Teri Shearer, an associate professor at Smith School of Business, has been appointed deputy provost.

Dr. Shearer, currently the associate dean of faculty at Smith School of Business, replaces Laeeque Daneshmend, who is returning to his faculty position as a professor in the Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining, in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science.

“Dr. Shearer brings extensive academic and administrative experience to this role,” says Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). “I would also like to thank Dr. Daneshmend for his dedication and commitment to the position over the past three years.”

As the deputy provost, Dr. Shearer will work closely with Queen’s senior management team to advance the academic, operational, and budgetary goals of the university. Among her responsibilities, Dr. Shearer will play a leadership role, on behalf of the provost, in overseeing academic appointments.

Throughout her time at Queen’s, Dr. Shearer has been actively involved in the administration at the school of business, most recently as associate dean. She also served as chair of the school’s faculty board and chair of the academic appeals committee from 2008-2012, and she has been active on numerous other committees. Additionally, she has represented the school of business on Senate, and is a past chair of both the Senate Budget Review Committee and the Senate Committee on Academic Procedures.

Dr. Shearer joined Queen’s in 1996 after completing her PhD at the University of Iowa. Her research interests centre on the social and behavioural consequences of accounting practices, and she has published in some of the top journals in her field.

Getting a jump on retirement

Queen’s employees looking to prepare for life after work can now access a suite of services offered by Human Resources (HR).

“We want to assist Queen’s employees as they look ahead to the challenges and opportunities offered by retirement,” says Corey Scott, Human Resources Training Co-ordinator. “We believe that the workshops will smooth the process of transitioning from paid employment to retirement.”

The pre-retirement suite of services will cover a wide range of topics including:

  • Financial planning
  • Queen’s Pension Plan
  • The emotional effects of retirement
[Staff]
Queen's Human Resources aims to encourage a dialogue about the challenges and opportunities offered by retirement.

HR will offer the pre-retirement suite of services through a variety of means including workshops led by external experts as well as Queen’s facilitators, lunch and learn sessions, and online courses offered through the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP).

Mr. Scott says the pre-retirement suite is not restricted to employees who are quickly closing in on retirement.

“Statistics show that Canadians are living longer and that traditional sources of retirement income are changing, so it’s important that employees start planning earlier for their retirement to ensure they are as financially and emotionally prepared as possible when the time comes,” he says.      

Visit the HR learning catalogue to sign-up for the pre-retirement offerings. The learning catalogue also contains a listing of all the certificate programs, workshops and wellness programs Queen’s HR offers to help employees achieve their professional and personal goals. A few upcoming highlights from October and November include:

Oct. 13 Delivering Business Presentations with Style and Confidence (three-part workshop)
Oct.14 Lunch & Learn: The Fundamentals of Change and Transition
Oct. 27 Personality Dimensions
Oct. 28 New Staff Orientation
Nov. 3 MS Excel – Introduction
Nov. 19 Positive Space
Nov. 19 MS Outlook – More than Email
Nov. 19 Meetings that Matter
Nov. 24 How to Plan an Event on Campus
Nov. 24 MS Excel – Intermediate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have questions, please contact Corey Scott, Training Coordinator, at ext. 78418, or Shannon Hill, Learning and Development Specialist, at ext. 74175. Alternately, you can reach the Organizational Development and Learning team by email.

Major accomplishments

  • Major Admissions Awards
    Emily Heffernan, a third-year electrical engineering student, speaks with Chancellor Jim Leech at the major admissions awards reception.
  • Major Admissions Awards
    Kyle MacNeil, a fourth-year student at the School of Computing, delivers a speech at the major admissions awards reception in Wallace Hall.
  • Major Admissions Awards
    Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, speaks to the major admissions award recipients Wednesday, Sept. 30.
  • Major Admissions Awards
    Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), speaks at an event for major admissions awards recipients at Wallace Hall.

Queen’s University recognized a special group of students on Wednesday as it hosted the annual reception for major admission award recipients.

At the event in Wallace Hall, a pair of upper-year students offered their advice and personal insights for life at Queen’s and beyond.

Kyle MacNeil, a fourth-year student at the School of Computing, from Upper Rawdon, NS, says that if it wasn’t for the Chancellor’s Scholarship, he wouldn’t be at Queen’s. However, he added that the benefits of the award were more than financial. He also found a community. 

“All the other people who received Chancellor’s Scholarships – we created a group on Facebook – that helped when I first came to Queen’s because I automatically connected with this group of people,” he says. “One of them is my best friend now and the fellow recipients have helped each other over the years.” 

Emily Heffernan is a third-year electrical engineering student from Alliston, Ont., and a recipient of the Chernoff Family Award. She spoke about the challenges of university life – expected and unexpected – and urged her fellow recipients to remain flexible and resilient.

“My biggest advice is to find something that you are really interested in,” she says. “Don’t worry if you think it’s the ‘right’ thing to do or what you are ‘supposed’ to do be doing, but just find something you are passionate about and I find that everything falls into place.”

Currently, there are 245 entering and in-course award recipients at Queen’s from across the country, and across all faculties and departments.  

The selection process at Queen’s is rigorous, with more than 200 faculty, including members of the Retirees Association at Queen’s, volunteering to evaluate the nearly 1,200 submissions.  

“Major Admission Award recipients are engaged in their communities, and demonstrate outstanding leadership abilities, creativity, initiative, and academic excellence,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, who emceed the event. “They continue a high level of engagement and academic success throughout their time here at Queen’s, and we are proud to recognize their accomplishments.”

The awards are generously supported by numerous donors. Many donors want to give back this way because they, too, received some form of support, recognition and encouragement when they were students. Their generosity has a significant impact within the Queen's community and the recipients of their awards. 

The 2016-17 Major Admission Award application is now open for students applying to Queen's for the 2016-17 academic year. The deadline to apply is Dec. 1, 2015. Visit the Student Awards website for further information about Queen’s Admission Awards.

Principal Woolf meets with local election candidates

Queen’s Principal Daniel Woolf held a series of meetings with local federal election candidates over the past few weeks, with the goal of learning more about the platforms of each party, articulating Queen’s priorities, and strengthening relationships with local community leaders and the university.

[Election Poster]“With the election close on the horizon, it was important for me to take the opportunity to discuss Queen’s agenda and current initiatives with the candidates,” Principal Woolf says. “We want to keep the communication lines open within the community and learn more about the policies and debates that will affect students and postsecondary education in the years to come.”

On separate occasions, Principal Woolf met with NDP candidate Daniel Beals, Conservative candidate Andy Brooke, Liberal candidate Mark Gerretsen and Green Party candidate Nathan Townend.

Principal Woolf – along with other executive heads of Ontario universities – will strive to work with student groups and electoral officials from all orders of government to promote youth participation in the electoral process. “I encourage all of our voting-eligible students to familiarize themselves with the candidates and party platforms and to get out and vote on Oct. 19 or in the advance polls. Make your voice heard,” he says.

On Queen’s campus, students can visit an information/registration booth in the Queen’s Centre (near the pharmacy) to ask questions and register to vote. The booth, hosted by local Elections Canada representatives, is open every weekday, 10 am–2 pm until Oct. 8.

Elections Canada also has a special section on its website for students and first-time voters. Included on the website is information on registering (whether in a student’s home riding or school riding), the four different ways to vote (on election day, in advance polls, at one of 400 Elections Canada offices across Canada, or by mail), and outreach on campus.

Introducing the Smith School of Business

  • [Stephen Smith School of Business]
    Stephen Smith speaks at Goodes Hall after unveiling his $50-million gift. In recognition of Mr. Smith’s vision and generosity, Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, announced a new name for the school: the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business.
  • [Stephen Smith School of Business]
    Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, introduces Stephen Smith after it was revealed that he had donated $50-million to Queen's University. In recognition of the gift, Principal Woolf announced a new name for the school: the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business.
  • [Stephen Smith School of Business]
    From left: Board chair Barbara Palk; Initiative Campaign chair Gord Nixon; Dean David Saunders; Stephen Smith; Principal Daniel Woolf; and Chancellor Jim Leech, attend the announcement that Mr. Smith donated $50 million to Queen's.
  • [Stephen Smith School of Business]
    Chancellor Jim Leech, Stephen Smith and Principal Daniel Woolf react to the unveiling of new banners after it was announced that Queen's School of Business has been renamed the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business in recognition of Mr. Smith's vision and generosity.
  • [Stephen Smith School of Business]
    Students wearing T-shirts marking the renaming of the Queen's School of Business as the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business in recognition of his vision and generosity in donating $50 million to Queen's University, attend Thursday's announcement.

Business education has a new name at Queen’s University, following a historic $50-million gift from alumnus Stephen Smith (Sc’72).

The donation is the largest-ever gift to any business school in Canada, and one of the largest in Queen’s history. It comes as part of the university’s Initiative Campaign.

In recognition of Mr. Smith’s vision and generosity, Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, announced a new name for the school: the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business.

“Queen’s is thrilled to receive this remarkable gift from such a distinguished alumnus and outstanding Canadian. On behalf of Queen’s, I would like to express our deepest gratitude to Stephen Smith for his vision and generosity,” says Principal Woolf. “This gift will help strengthen the university’s global reputation for excellence in business education and provide a legacy that will benefit students and faculty for generations to come.”

Stephen Smith (Sc’72)
Photo credit: Margaret Mulligan for First National Financial Corp.

Mr. Smith is a leading Canadian financial services entrepreneur and philanthropist, who believes deeply in the importance of education and its power to drive the prosperity of our country. He made his donation to advance the leadership position of Queen’s and its school of business within Canada and internationally.

“I have been very fortunate in both my professional and personal life and I am proud to have this opportunity to give back to Queen’s. The university provided me with a transformative education that served as a foundation for all of my endeavours,” Mr. Smith says. “The school of business has the energy and strategy to advance its international influence and recognition, which will be good for students, the university and for Canada.”

The donation will be endowed to provide ongoing resources to attract top talent to the business school and further raise the excellence of business education at Queen’s, ultimately benefiting the economic competiveness of Ontario and Canada.

The gift will fund new chairs and professorships to help recruit and retain leading faculty members, and will significantly increase the number of scholarships to attract top students.

“This extraordinary gift will enable the school to continue to transform business education and further its leadership position both nationally and internationally,” says David Saunders, Dean of the Stephen J. R. Smith School of Business. “It will allow the school to bring together the best minds from around the world to deliver innovative learning experiences and pursue leading business research.”

Mr. Smith earned a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in electrical engineering from Queen’s University in 1972 and is the co-founder, chairman and chief executive officer of First National Financial Corporation, Canada’s largest non-bank lender of residential and commercial mortgages. He is also chairman and co-owner of Canada Guaranty Mortgage Insurance, the country’s third-largest mortgage insurance provider.

Learn more about Stephen Smith and his gift to Queen’s

 

https://youtu.be/d5lRqe0CABg

University, CUPE ratify collective agreements

The tentative collective agreements between Queen’s University and the Canadian Union of Public Employees locals 229, 254 and 1302 are now in effect following successful ratification votes by CUPE members earlier today.

The human resources committee of Queen’s Board of Trustees recently voted to ratify the agreements.

“I want to thank the negotiating teams for both the university and the CUPE locals for their efforts over the past 15 months,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “CUPE members from all three locals play important roles in supporting Queen’s exceptional learning environment, and these agreements will help further the university’s academic mission within the limits of our current financial reality.”

The new, four-year agreements will each expire on June 30, 2018. Highlights include:

CUPE Local 229

  • A one-time, lump-sum payment of $750, less any applicable deductions, following ratification
  • A scale increase of 1 per cent across the board, effective July 1, 2015
  • A scale increase of 1.25 per cent across the board, effective July 1, 2016
  • A scale increase of 1.25 per cent across the board, effective July 1, 2017

CUPE Local 254

  • A one-time, lump-sum payment of $750, less any applicable deductions, following ratification
  • A scale increase of 1 per cent across the board effective July 1, 2015, with eligible employees receiving a step increase
  • A scale increase of 1.25 per cent across the board effective July 1, 2016, with eligible employees receiving a step increase
  • A scale increase of 1.25 per cent across the board effective July 1, 2017, with eligible employees receiving a step increase

CUPE Local 1302

  • A one-time, lump-sum payment of $750, less any applicable deductions, following ratification
  • A scale increase of 1 per cent across the board effective July 1, 2015, with eligible employees receiving a step increase
  • A scale increase of 1.25 per cent across the board effective July 1, 2016, with eligible employees receiving a step increase
  • A scale increase of 1.25 per cent across the board effective July 1, 2017, with eligible employees receiving a step increase

The parties also entered into separate memoranda of agreement, reaffirming the parties’ shared commitment to the university pension project and setting out the process for engaging in that project.

Negotiations between the three CUPE Locals and the university began in June of last year. Bargaining took place over 23 dates collectively, seven of which were conducted with the assistance of a provincially appointed conciliator.

CUPE Local 229 represents approximately 250 heating and maintenance employees; CUPE Local 254 represents approximately 90 technicians; and CUPE Local 1302 represents approximately 55 library and archive employees.

Campus electricity demand reduction notification for Sept. 8

Due to current temperatures and humidity levels across the province, Tuesday, Sept. 8 will be an Electricity Demand Response Day. Please consult the attached newsletter for a complete list of buildings that will be participating in today’s response.

Please note:

  • Jeffery Hall, Queen’s Centre, Stauffer Library, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Stirling Hall and Watson Hall will not be responding on Tuesday, September 8 only.
  • Wednesday, September 9 has the potential to be a response day; however,  a separate notification will be issued tomorrow to either confirm or cancel the response on this date.

If you are interested in helping with the response, please turn off non-essential lighting during the day and shutdown your computers and other non-essential equipment before you leave at the end of each day.

More information about the electricity peak demand management program is available on the sustainability website. Those with questions may also contact Fixit at extension 77301 (internal), 613-533-6757 (external) or by e-mail.

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