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Internationalization

Fudan delegation visits Queen's

  • Yang Yuliang, former President of Fudan University (Far left), at a reception with Fudan students currently studying at Queen's along with Prof. James Miller, Director of the Queen's Semester in Shanghai program (Far right).
    Yang Yuliang, former President of Fudan University (far left), at a reception with Fudan students currently studying at Queen's along with Prof. James Miller, Director of the Queen's Semester in Shanghai program (Far right).
  • Queen's Principal Daniel Woolf and former Fudan President Yang Yuliang attend a dinner with dignitaries from both universities and the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Canada.
    Queen's Principal Daniel Woolf and former Fudan President Yang Yuliang attend a dinner with dignitaries from both universities and the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Canada.

A delegation from Fudan University, one of China’s leading institutions, paid a visit to Queen’s this week as their only Canadian stop on a larger North American tour. Former Fudan President Yang Yuliang led the delegation, which toured the Queen’s University Biological Station and the new Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts before attending meetings and events with Principal Woolf and other Queen’s representatives.

The visit also included a special reception with both Fudan students currently studying at Queen’s, and Queen's students, some of whom had studied at Fudan as part of an exchange program coordinated by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures (LLCU).

Located in Shanghai, Fudan is one of Queen’s strongest Chinese partner institutions, with a number of ongoing academic and research partnerships. It also plays host to Queen’s China Liaison Office. Principal Woolf and a delegation from Queen’s visited the university in 2012.

Internationalization is a priority for Queen’s and one of the key drivers in its strategic framework. China is one of the university’s international areas of focus as it seeks to enhance its international student recruitment efforts and research prominence.

English language training expands for international students

International students who need further English language training can now enroll in a new educational pathway at Queen’s University. Leveraging the strength of the Queen’s School of English, the university is now able to offer student candidates who fall short of the university’s language requirements a new language training program before progressing to their academic program of study.

Students are taught in small classes at the School of English's QBridge program. (University Communications)

Called QBridge, the program is up to one full year of the English for Academic Purposes Program to help students become academically, linguistically and culturally prepared for their studies and is then followed by their four-year bachelor’s degree. After completing a fall and winter session of the language training course, students begin their academic program. 

“We have a lot of students apply who are academically excellent but don’t meet our rigorous language requirements,” says Chris Coupland, Director, International Undergraduate Enrolment. “With the creation of this pathway , Queen’s will become accessible to a greater number of strong international candidates who will get the English language training they need to be successful at university and beyond.“ 

Previously, international students who met Queen’s academic requirements but did not quite meet language standards were offered enrolment in an 8-week summer English immersion program to bolster their skills before classes started. This program, now called QBridge Accelerated, will continue to be offered, while the one-year program will be tailored to students who need greater training and preparation.

Currently, there are two program streams available through the Faculty of Arts and Science and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. Initial recruitment for QBridge in the 2015-16 academic year will be limited to 30 students total with potential to grow in subsequent years.

“The expansion of QBridge will allow more international students to receive a Queen’s education,” says Kathy O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International). “The superb language training resources we have on campus provide an essential support to student success and this program allows for a seamless pathway to degree studies for academically qualified students.”

Already up and running, QBridge has begun receiving applications for the coming academic year. 

More information about QBridhe can be found at the School of English's website.

A warm welcome to the castle

[Tri-colour globe]
Queen's in the World

Earlier this month, students studying at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) received their official BISC scarf in a ceremony in the ballroom of the historic Herstmonceux Castle.

The scarf—a navy blue knit with red stripes and the BISC logo—marks the students’ entry into the BISC and Queen’s communities. This newly formed tradition is based on the venerable British varsity scarf, which is used to differentiate students attending the top colleges across the British university system.

[Presentation of a Bader International Study Centre Scarf]
Tom Gallini (right), BISC Student and Enrolment Services Manager, presents a Bader International Study Centre scarf to Zelia Bukhari (ArtSci ’18).

The scarf is given to every student who spends a term at the BISC. It is hoped that they will become an attractive complement to the famous Queen’s jackets that are purchased by many students.

"The scarves serve as a visual reminder of the students’ membership in a strong, supportive, and vibrant community—one that we hope continues to play an important role in their lives long after they have completed their studies at the BISC and Queen’s,” says Tom Gallini, BISC Student and Enrolment Services Manager, who presented the scarves along with Caroline Harber, BISC Operations Manager, and Christian Lloyd, BISC Academic Director.

The BISC hosts approximately 350 students each year across its three terms. A revitalized first year program based on the theme “thinking locally, acting globally” provides a dynamic international foundation to a Queen’s degree, while upper year programming allows students to develop international experience that is crucial in our increasingly globalized economy.

"As our business, political, and research communities become more international, so too must our system of education if we intend to continue to develop strong leaders,” says Dr. Lloyd. “We hope to see our scarves on the campuses of both Queen’s and our partner universities around the world, as a sign of our students’ support of this ethos.”

Learn more about the Bader International Study Centre.

International collaborations front and centre during visit

Principal Daniel Woolf and Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research), toured medical research facilities at Imperial College London during their recent trip to the United Kingdom. Jeremy Nicholson, a biochemist and head of Imperial College’s Department of Surgery and Cancer, hosted Principal Woolf and Dr. Liss.

[Principal Woolf and Steven Liss]
Principal Daniel Woolf and Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research), listen as Imperial College London's Jeremy Nicholson explains his research.

Dr. Nicholson forged links with several Queen’s researchers following his selection as the Faculty of Health Sciences Bruce Visiting Scholar in Surgical Innovation in 2013. As a result, Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences is planning a partnership with Imperial College to use Queen’s-based technology to advance the development of an Imperial College-developed intelligent surgical knife that can analyze the smoke generated by a cautery scalpel to identify the margins of tumors and ultimately improve the removal of malignant tissue.

In addition to the visit to Imperial College, Principal Woolf and Dr. Liss joined in a delegation representing the U15 group of Canadian research universities, of which Principal Woolf is now vice-chair. The delegation met with members of the Russell Group, which represents 24 leading public research universities in the U.K. The principal also met with the staff and faculty from the Bader International Study Centre, the university’s castle campus in Herstmonceux, U.K., and Queen’s alumni in the London area. 

Principal's trip to U.K. will strengthen international ties

Principal Daniel Woolf hopes that his first overseas trip of the academic year will allow him to strengthen the university’s relationship with potential research partners and engage with alumni, among other goals.

Principal Woolf is travelling to the United Kingdom on Oct. 7 to 10 with Vice-Principal (Research) Steven Liss. They will be part of a delegation representing the U15 group of Canadian research universities, of which Principal Woolf is now vice-chair. The delegation will meet with representatives from the Russell Group, which represents 24 leading public research universities in the U.K.

“The U15 has a highly respected profile abroad and, as a group, we will be able to highlight Canada as a country where a good deal of important research is happening,” says Principal Woolf. “We will also have a number of bilateral discussions with a number of universities to see about the possibility of establishing research partnerships in the future. Strengthening global research partnerships is an important component of the university’s internationalization and research prominence strategies. “

The trip will also allow the principal to meet with the team from the Bader International Study Centre, the university’s castle campus in Herstmonceux, U.K., as well as with Queen’s alumni in the London area.

Expanding Queen’s international reach is a strategic priority for Principal Woolf and the university, and a key driver in its strategic framework. Along with promoting international research partnerships, increasing international student recruitment is a top priority.

“Over the coming decades the universities that flourish will be those that have diversified beyond their home countries and established themselves at an international level,” says Principal Woolf. “Becoming better known internationally will not happen overnight; it is a challenge that will require commitment over a sustained period.

Queen’s welcomed new students from 51 countries around the world this year, and the university’s renewed international undergraduate recruitment efforts are already showing results, with international students making up five per cent of this year’s incoming undergraduate class.

 

 

Times Higher Education releases university ranking

Times Higher Education released its 2014 world university rankings on Oct. 1, with Queen’s placing in the 251-275 band of the world’s top universities.

A majority of Canada’s universities fell in this year’s ranking, especially relative to Asian universities, which have been moving up in recent years. Although Queen’s position fell from the 226-250 band in 2013, the university did see its scores in the ranking’s teaching and research categories increase this year.

“Queen’s greatest strength lies in providing a transformative student learning experience within a research intensive environment. But it is a difficult path toward continued excellence as a balanced academy, and one that does not necessarily help us in international rankings,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “Nevertheless we continue to punch above our weight when it comes to research and the recent announcement of Gilles Gerbier as our first Canada Excellence Research Chair is a demonstration of Queen’s excellence, in this case in astrophysics, at both a national and global level.”

The Times Higher Education ranking uses surveys to measure institutional prestige in both research and teaching, as well as collected data to measure indicators such as research output, citations, research income, teaching quality and international orientation.

"We continue to punch above our weight when it comes to research and the recent announcement of Gilles Gerbier as our first Canada Excellence Research Chair is a demonstration of Queen’s excellence, in this case in astrophysics, at both a national and global level.”

- Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor

Fluctuations in the rankings are to be expected from year to year. Other recent international rankings released include the Shanghai Jiao Tong academic ranking of world universities (ARWU), which was released on Aug. 15 and saw Queen’s maintain its position within the 201-300 range. The QS world university rankings were announced Sept. 16 and saw Queen’s move up two positions to 187th globally.

“Each ranking uses a different methodology, and no single ranking captures the full range of Queen’s strengths, particularly the quality of our student learning experience,” says Kathy O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International).

Expanding the university’s international reach is a strategic priority for Queen’s and a key driver in its strategic framework. Queen’s renewed international recruitment efforts are already showing results, with international students making up five per cent of this year’s incoming class.

Coptic Pope delivers Mathers Lecture

  • [Pope Tawadros II]
    Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church delivers the Donald Mathers Memorial Lecture Friday afternoon at Grant Hall.
  • [Pope Tawadros II]
    Richard Ascough, Director of the School of Religion, introduces Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church.
  • [Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church]
    Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church listens to his introduction Friday before giving the Donald Mathers Memorial Lecture.
  • [Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church]
    Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church delivers the Donald Mathers Memorial Lecture Friday afternoon at Grant Hall.
  • [Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Church]
    A sold-out crowd listens as Pope Tawadros II delivers the Donald Mathers Memorial Lecture Friday at Grant Hall.

In a well-attended lecture at Grant Hall, His Holiness Pope Tawadros II, Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark, focused on strengthening the bonds between different denominations of Christianity.

The lecture, “The Role of the Coptic Church in Strengthening Unity and Narrowing Gaps between Denominations,” dealt with the formation of the Coptic Church and the greater role it plays in Christianity today.

Richard Ascough, Director, School of Religion, and Susan Mumm, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, both said they were honoured to host His Holiness. Also in attendance was Sophie Kiwala, Liberal MPP for Kingston and the Islands, Archbishop Brendan Michael O’Brien of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese Kingston, and the Rt. Rev. Michael Oulton, Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Ontario.

Students introduced to international possibilities

Students interested in studying, working, volunteering, interning and teaching English abroad gathered in the Biosciences Atrium today for the Queen’s Go Abroad Fair.

The fair brought participating universities and study abroad programs, volunteer organizations, language schools and scholarship and funding programs to campus to showcase the opportunities available to students for international travel.

Those looking for more information about the international resources available to students can visit the Queen’s University International Centre’s website.

Coptic Pope to deliver unity message in lecture

The Pope of the Coptic Church will give a lecture about strengthening the bonds between different Christian denominations. 

Pope Tawadros II.

His Holiness Pope Tawadros II, Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark, Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate will deliver the Donald Mathers Memorial Lecture this Friday.

The sold-out lecture, titled “The Role of the Coptic Church in Strengthening Unity and Narrowing Gaps between Denominations,” will feature a discussion of the roles of the Coptic Church in Egypt, its country of origin, as well as in other nations including Canada.

“The School of Religion is honoured to host His Holiness during his Canadian tour,” says Richard Ascough, Director, School of Religion. “As the person with the highest religious authority in the Coptic Church, the lecture given by His Holiness will provide valuable insight into the Coptic Church’s role in Christianity today.”

Pope Tawadros is visiting Canada on a tour during which he will bless the founding of the first Canadian Coptic Monastery in Perth, Ont. He plans to come through Kingston following a trip to Ottawa.

Local dignitaries including Sophie Kiwala, Liberal MPP for Kingston and the Islands, Archbishop Brendan Michael O’Brien of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese Kingston, and the Rt. Rev. Michael Oulton, Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Ontario, will also be in attendance at the lecture.  

“His Holiness is very much perceived as a peaceful diplomat and we look forward to connecting with the Canadian Coptic community through this event,” says Dr. Ascough. “His Holiness’ visit will strengthen the connections between Canada and the Coptic Church.”

For more information on the Coptic Pope’s visit to campus, follow this link.

Principal Woolf releases strategic framework report

Principal Daniel Woolf

Principal Daniel Woolf presented an initial report on the strategic framework to the university’s Board of Trustees at its meeting on Sept. 19.

The strategic framework was introduced by Principal Woolf earlier this year as a capstone planning tool to strengthen Queen’s vision as a balanced academy over the coming five years.

“The strategic framework is designed around four strategic drivers, each of which is critical to Queen’s success as a research-intensive university that delivers a transformative student learning experience,” says Principal Woolf. “While most universities focus on either teaching or research, Queen’s has chosen the path – a difficult one – of striving to excel at both. We believe however that they are mutually beneficial aspects of our academic mission.”

The strategic framework's four strategic drivers are: the student learning experience, research prominence, financial sustainability and internationalization. The initial report highlights a number of ways the university is advancing the framework’s four strategic drivers, including:

  • Enhancing student engagement and experiential learning
  • Creating new, high-quality academic programs
  • Promoting international research collaborations
  • Attracting more international students
  • Carefully containing costs across the university

The report also features several performance metrics that will help gauge the university’s success in each strategic driver. Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), says that one of the next steps in implementing the framework is to set university level targets for these performance measures which, he says, will allow us to measure our progress throughout the five-year life of strategic framework.

The initial report can be read here, and more information is available on the strategic framework website.

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