Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Business

TRC report brings communities together to change course

  • Janice Hill, Director of Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, speaks with lecturer Nathan Brinklow during Tuesday's event marking the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Janice Hill, Director of Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, speaks with lecturer Nathan Brinklow during Tuesday's event marking the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Principal Daniel Woolf holds up a copy of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report during Tuesday's event at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Principal Daniel Woolf holds up a copy of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report during Tuesday's event at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Marlene Brant Castellano, Co-Chair of the Aboriginal Council at Queen's University, and Queen's Native Student Association President Lauren Winkler comment on the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Marlene Brant Castellano, Co-Chair of the Aboriginal Council at Queen's University, and Queen's Native Student Association President Lauren Winkler comment on the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force Co-Chairs Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), and Mark Green, Professor (Civil Engineering), welcome guests to the event held at Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force Co-Chairs Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), and Mark Green, Professor (Civil Engineering), welcome guests to the event held at Agnes Etherington Art Centre. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Members of the Queen's community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Members of the Queen's community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Members of the Queen's community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Members of the Queen's community take part in a Haudenosaunee round dance at the event marking the release of the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force’s final report. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Members of the Four Directions Women Singers – from left, Laura Maracle, Vanessa McCourt, and Melanie Howard – sing an Anishinaabe honour song during Tuesday's event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Members of the Four Directions Women Singers – from left, Laura Maracle, Vanessa McCourt, and Melanie Howard – sing an Anishinaabe honour song during Tuesday's event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
  • Laura Maracle, Aboriginal Cultural Safety Coordinator at Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, speaks with Laurel Claus-Johnson of the Katarokwi Grandmothers Council during Tuesday's event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)
    Laura Maracle, Aboriginal Cultural Safety Coordinator at Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, speaks with Laurel Claus-Johnson of the Katarokwi Grandmothers Council during Tuesday's event. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

At a special reception Tuesday night to mark the unveiling of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) Task Force final report and recommendations, Principal Daniel Woolf told the crowd of students, staff, faculty, alumni, and local Indigenous community members that, “Today, our communities come together to change course.”

“By taking steps to ensure that Indigenous histories are shared, by recognizing that we can all benefit from Indigenous knowledge, and by creating culturally validating learning environments, we can begin to reduce barriers to education and create a more welcoming, inclusive, and diverse university,” said Principal Woolf.

The special event, held at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, and the TRC report represent a significant milestone for Queen’s and the local Indigenous communities, signalling a broad and sustained effort to build and improve relations, and to effect meaningful institutional change. The recommendations in the report span everything from hiring practices and programming, to research, community outreach, and the creation of Indigenous cultural spaces on campus. (More detailed list of recommendations below.)

Principal Woolf reiterated his commitment to fulfilling the recommendations in the task force’s final report, and to illustrate that commitment, he announced that the university will be creating an Office of Indigenous Initiatives in the coming months – an announcement met by a loud round of applause from the audience.

“This is just one of the task force’s many recommendations that I am committed to implementing across campus, and because I believe that we are stronger together, I welcome the rest of the Queen’s community to join me in that commitment,” he said.

Principal Woolf also stated his commitment to the TRC recommendations in a special Senate meeting on March 7, where he acknowledged “Queen’s own history as an institution that participated in a colonial tradition that caused great harm to Indigenous People.”

‘We are making history’

Bringing together Indigenous and non-Indigenous community members, Tuesday’s event was hosted by TRC Task Force co-chairs Mark Green and Jill Scott and showcased the importance of ceremony – with a traditional Mohawk opening presented by lecturer Nathan Brinklow, presentations by Elder Marlene Brant Castellano and student Lauren Winkler, an Anishinaabe Honour Song performed by the Four Directions Women Singers, and to end the evening, a Haudenosaunee Round Dance, led by performers from Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, that brought guests together in a huge circle, hands linked.

“Ceremony reminds us that what we do today is important, impacting the relationships and responsibilities that we carry forward, and woven into our memory as a community,” said Dr. Brant Castellano, a member of the task force, Queen’s alumna, and pioneer and champion of Indigenous rights and education.

“We are making history,” Dr. Brant continued. “In creating the task force, Queen’s has stepped up to ask of itself: What can we do to advance reconciliation? … The task force has brought together voices from the Queen’s community saying: We can do this. We have a responsibility to do this. The report is presented to the principal, who speaks on behalf of the university. In this ceremony, all who are present become witnesses to Queen’s acknowledgement of past errors and commitment to walk together with Indigenous Peoples and others of good mind to restore and maintain a relationship of peace, friendship, and respect.”

“I would like to thank you all here today because by being here, you are showing me that you acknowledge the truths of our past, that you stand in support of these recommendations, and that you will make a commitment to seeing the recommendations through"
​~ Lauren Winkler

Lauren Winkler, student and president of the Queen’s Native Student Association, as well as deputy commissioner of Indigenous affairs for the Alma Mater Society and member of the TRC Task Force, spoke about the experiences of Indigenous students and the challenges and racist encounters they face on Queen’s campus.

"Our education system has failed and is failing to educate our students at the cost of Indigenous students. The university recognizes this – it’s one of the truths in our truth and reconciliation process," said Ms. Winkler, who went on to thank Principal Woolf for his acknowledgements of the history of mistreatment of the Indigenous community and Queen’s role in perpetuating the mistreatment.

"I would like to thank you all here today because by being here, you are showing me that you acknowledge the truths of our past, that you stand in support of these recommendations, and that you will make a commitment to seeing the recommendations through," said Ms. Winkler.

The TRC Task Force’s final report, which includes reproductions of artwork included in the Indigenous art collection at the Agnes, outlines recommendations and timelines for implementation – in particular, the formation of an implementation team that will work with faculties, schools, and shared service units to expedite recommendations. The task force asks for five-year plans from the faculties, schools, and other units to be completed by fall 2017.


Opportunities for undergraduate research

Each year, the Undergraduate Student Summer Research Fellowship (USSRF) provides students at Queen’s the opportunity to gain some valuable experience that will help them in their continuing studies and into their career.

Through the program, undergraduate students in social sciences, humanities, business and education are able to further develop their research skills under the guidance of a faculty researcher.

[USSRF]
Students who took part in the Undergraduate Student Summer Research Fellowship (USSRF) explain their research during a poster display at Stauffer Library. (University Communications)

Conor Hannigan (Artsci’17) took part in the USSRF program in 2016 and recommends it for any undergraduate student.

“The USSRF program is an exceptional opportunity for any undergraduate interested in continuing on to graduate studies or eventually academia, to develop research skills,” he says. “Not only is it useful for developing skills, but it has the potential to both broaden and deepen the student's research opportunities and activities. For example, the research I conducted through the USSRF has led me on to an undergraduate thesis as well as upcoming participation in the Inquiry@Queen's undergraduate research conference.”

He adds that the program is also an excellent way for students to build a strong relationship with a Queen’s faculty member. By working with David Haglund (Political Studies), Mr. Hannigan says he gained a greater understanding of how academic research is conducted as well as how to design and conduct research projects.

“Having a faculty member who has continued to act as a mentor for me following the USSRF work has motivated me to work harder and achieve more in my studies,” he says. “The program provides students with the opportunity to engage in research they are genuinely interested in by virtue of designing a project with a supervisor. This, of course, has both instrumental and intrinsic value.”

The USSRF program was established in 2011and is intended to provide students with meaningful opportunities to engage in discovery-based learning and to develop research and presentation skills.

The deadline for applications is March 10, at 4 pm. Up to 19 fellowships of $6,000 each will be offered to students whose projects take place on Queen’s campus and up to three fellowships of $5,000 each will be offered to students whose projects take place at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) at Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England.

For more information, visit the USSRF program website.

Opportunities for international collaboration

Queen's in the World

Applications are open for the International Visitors Program of the Principal’s Development Fund, a program that helps connect Queen’s with academics and institutions around the world by sponsoring visits by international scholars. The program also works to foster connections between Queen’s and its partners within the Matariki Network of Universities.

“This program provides a tremendous opportunity for collaboration and cross-pollination of ideas between the Queen’s community and scholars and universities around the globe,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “I am very pleased to offer this funding as part of our ongoing support for international partnerships and, in particular, alliances with the Matariki Network.”

Last year, Professor Karol Miller from the University of Western Australia visited Queen's through the International Visitors Program of the Principal's Development Fund.

The International Visitors Program includes three application categories, each of which offers grants of up to $3,000. Category one is the open program, which helps to cover the costs of bringing an international scholar to Queen’s for a period of at least three days. 

The other two application categories focus on leveraging Queen’s membership in the Matariki Network of Universities. One of these is an extension of the visiting scholars program, specifically aimed at bringing visitors to Queen’s from the other Matariki universities, which include the University of Western Australia (UWA), Tübingen University, Uppsala University, Dartmouth College, University of Otago, and Durham University. Last year, Professor Karol Miller from UWA visited Queen’s through the program and gave a talk about his research into computational biomechanics at the School of Computing Distinguished Speaker Seminar.

The third application category provides funding to assist Queen’s faculty and staff to travel to Matariki partner institutions to build new collaborations. This seed funding may be used to initiate new academic, research, or administrative initiatives.

Applications for these categories are due to the relevant dean’s office by April 21, 2017. For more information, including program details and application forms, visit the Principal’s website.

Questions about the Principal’s Development Fund may be directed to Csilla Volford, Coordinator, International Projects and Events, in the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International).

 

A worthwhile investment

Queen’s students will vie for the title of Canada’s top student investor this winter, while at the same time raising money for a good cause.

The Capitalize for Kids Student Challenge will feature more than a thousand students from 30 different universities across Canada going head to head in a portfolio management competition. There is no cost to register, but to be eligible for prizes and professional benefits such as mentorship, participants must fundraise at least $100 to support cutting-edge research and programs at the Centre for Brain and Mental Health at SickKids Hospital in Toronto.

[Joshua Wine, Jack Hayward, and Lauren Wong]
Joshua Wine, Jack Hayward, and Lauren Wong plan to keep a close eye on the stock ticker in Goodes Hall once the Capitalize for Kids Student Challenge kicks off Jan. 16. The national portfolio management competition will give students the opportunity to hone their financial management skills while at the same time raising money in support of children’s brain and mental-health research.

Joshua Wine, Com’17, Jack Hayward, Com’17, and Lauren Wong, Com’17 – executive members of Queen’s University Investment Counsel – are encouraging Queen’s students from all academic programs to participate in the competition.

“Nearly everyone I talk to has a friend or family member or knows someone who experienced a brain or mental health issue when they were young,” says Mr. Wine. “The Student Challenge gives students the chance to support a worthy cause as they develop the skills and experience necessary for an investment career after graduation.”

From Jan. 16-April 16, students will select and manage an investment portfolio. Participants must submit a 500-word explanation of their investment thesis. Final ranking is determined by the performance of the portfolio and a juried evaluation of the provided rationale.

Capital for a cause

The Student Investor Challenge is hosted by Capitalize for Kids Foundation, which was established by Queen’s alumni Jeff Gallant, Com’11, and Kyle MacDonald, Com’11, in 2014. Justin Scaini, Artsci’13, Associate Director, Capitalize for Kids, says the organization launched the student challenge in order to engage future investment leaders who want to make a difference.

Dynamic Duo
Smith School of Business profiled Jeff Gallant and Kyle MacDonald, founders of Capitalize for Kids, in 2014. Read more about their charitable work

“Mental health is the number one health issue facing young people,” says Mr. Scaini, who notes that young people between the ages of 15 and 24 experience mental illness and/or substance-use disorders more than any other age group. “To tackle this immense challenge, Capitalize for Kids supports projects focused on depression and brain injuries, which are among the most prevalent issues experienced by children and youth.”

Mr. Scaini developed a passion for supporting youth mental health in his second year at Queen’s. He became involved in Jack.org, which was founded by Eric Windeler and Sandra Hanington after their son died by suicide in March 2010. After acting in a Jack.org educational video, Mr. Scaini played a leading role in organizing the Jack Summit (formerly Unleash the Noise), a national student mental health innovation summit held each year in Toronto.

After working with Accenture as a management consultant after graduation, Mr. Scaini jumped at the chance to join Capitalize for Kids, where he could combine his passion for improving youth mental health with his professional interests.

Investing in financial literacy

Mr. Scaini says the investment challenge also offers educational value for university students across all disciplines.

“With the challenge, we wanted to enhance financial literacy of young people. We believe the competition is an engaging way to teach students about investing and portfolio management,” he says.

Mr. Wine, the Queen’s student organizing the competition on campus, agrees the competition has the potential to make the stock market less intimidating for students.

“We are at the point in our lives where we will be earning a salary soon, so it’s a good time to learn more about the stock market and gain a greater awareness of investment opportunities,” he says.

The deadline to sign up for the competition is Jan. 15. Visit the Capitalize for Kids website for more information.

Optimistic outlook

Uncertainty from the US election and a rise in anti-trade rhetoric were cited as reasons for the slow export growth, reduced business investments and increased inflation we can expect for Canada in 2017, according to Smith School of Business experts.

Evan Dudley (Finance) made his predictions for the 2017 Canadian economy at the annual Queen’s Smith Business Forecast Luncheon held last week in Kingston.

Blair Robertson (Finance) makes a presentation on the local economy during the annual Business Forecast Luncheon hosted by the Smith School of Business. (Supplied Photo)

“It’s not just Donald Trump and the challenges ahead for Canada-US relations that should concern us,” Dr. Dudley says. “The world is shifting towards greater protectionism – in the last six months alone, 145 new trade restrictions were imposed globally.”

Slow export growth, reduced business investments, and trade uncertainty will constrain output for Canada, he says. The coming year may see marginal growth in Canada’s real GDP, up 1.75 per cent from 1.40 per cent in 2016.  As well, persistent low oil prices and the difference in monetary policies between the U.S. and Canada will keep the value of the loonie down, with the Canada/US exchange rate holding at $0.75 USD, Dr. Dudley predicted.

Trade restrictions and expansionary fiscal policy on both sides of the border will push prices higher in the near term, with inflation expected to rise to 1.75 per cent from 1.5 per cent in 2016. The Canadian unemployment rate will remain around 7 per cent due to uncertainty about US economic policies under the Trump administration and low business spending in Canada.

Dr. Dudley’s forecast was not all doom and gloom, however, with strong growth projected for Kingston’s local economy.

The event closed with a panel discussion on “Creating the Conditions for Local Economic Growth,” moderated by the Smith School of Business’ Ken Wong (Marketing). Panel members included Mayor Bryan Paterson and Councillor Laura Turner.

The 2017 Forecast
• Real GDP growth rate of 1.75 per cent
• Inflation rate rise to 1.75 per cent
• Unemployment rate unchanged 7.0 per cent
• Interest rate (prime) unchanged at 2.7 per cent 
• Exchange rate (US/CDN) unchanged at $0.75

Wong emphasized the need to “broaden the tax base, foster more population growth, and, most of all, increase private sector investment.” Ms. Turner spoke to the city’s strengths as a tourist destination, noting the benefits of the low Canadian dollar in attracting US visitors.

Mayor Paterson said “2016 has been a great year” for Kingston, citing recent multi-million dollar investments in the city from Feihe International, a China-based manufacturer of infant formula, and Portuguese food processor Frulact Group. The goal, the mayor explained, is “branding Kingston as a city of entrepreneurship and innovation and working together to grow the city.”

Dr. Dudley shared the mayor’s optimism for Kingston looking forward, citing two expansion projects – Providence Care ($300 million) and the municipal airport ($16 million) – and the new Dunin-Deshpande Innovation Centre at Queen’s, as initiatives that will help spark growth in the city.

In addition to the forecast and panel discussion, attendees were treated to a non-traditional take on investment strategy from Blair Robertson (Finance) and a brief history of the forecast luncheon from the event’s founder Merv Daub, the Smith professor emeritus who established the luncheon 35 years ago to forge a connection between the school and the greater Kingston business community.

Fight for food

  • [Utcha Sawyers with students]
    Utcha Sawyers, a senior manager at FoodShare Toronto, speaks with students during the recent Social Innovation Bootcamp. (Submitted photo)
  • [Mara Shaw]
    Mara Shaw of Loving Spoonful leads students in a discussion of food justice and food insecurity. (Submitted photo)
  • [Utcha Sawyers and Tina Dacin]
    Utcha Sawyers (left), a senior manager at FoodShare Toronto, and Tina Dacin, Director, Smith School of Business Centre for Social Impact. (Submitted photo)

Hacking food justice was the theme at the recent Social Innovation Bootcamp hosted by the Centre for Social Impact at the Smith School of Business

The bi-annual bootcamp convenes Smith MBA and Bachelor of Commerce students who are working towards their Certificate in Responsible Leadership with community organizations and social enterprises who are addressing critical social problems.

Working in small teams, 65 students and representatives from FoodShare Toronto and the Loving Spoonful came together to apply an accelerated one-day design thinking process to three opportunities that FoodShare Canada is grappling with.      

The contributions from Smith students provided FoodShare and the Loving Spoonful with a set of unique ideas and approaches. At the same time, Smith students got a deeper look at how innovative organizations are using market-based approaches and community engagement to improve access to healthy food. 

“It was great to meet and work with people on a real-life problem. Together, we came up with a solution that really inspired me,” says Sophie Labrosse, Com’19.

The certificate program at the Centre for Social Impact offers graduate and undergraduate Smith School of Business students an opportunity to augment their degrees with an exciting experience-based, integrative exposure to the dynamic field of responsible leadership – exploring in depth areas such as business ethics, social innovation, social entrepreneurship, sustainability, and community engagement.

Visit the Centre for Social Impact website for more information about the Certificate in Responsible Leadership program and the Social Innovation Bootcamp, which is supported by Michael Kehoe, Com’78, and Suncor Energy Foundation.

Consultations held on fall term break

Task Force hosts town hall to gather input on fall break.

  • Deputy Provost and Chair of the Fall Term Break Task Force, Teri Shearer, welcomes attendees and explains the role of the task force in examining the implementation of a fall term break.
    Deputy Provost and Chair of the Fall Term Break Task Force, Teri Shearer, welcomes attendees and explains the role of the task force in examining the implementation of a fall term break.
  • Deputy Provost and Chair of the Fall Term Break Task Force, Teri Shearer, responds to an inquiry from a student with regards to the implementation of a fall break.
    Deputy Provost and chair of the Fall Term Break Task Force, Teri Shearer, responds to an inquiry from a student with regards to the implementation of a fall break.
  • Students line up to pose questions and discuss the implementation of a fall term break.
    Students line up to pose questions and discuss the implementation of a fall term break.

The Queen’s Fall Term Break Task Force held a town hall on Nov. 10 to allow students the opportunity to have their say on the implementation of a fall term break.

The meeting, led by Deputy Provost and Chair of the Fall Term Break Task Force, Teri Shearer, examined topics including student priorities, the current pre-exam study break, orientation week and other details. 

The town hall is one part of the consultation process, which has included a survey open to all members of the Queen’s community and various other consultation sessions. The Task Force, formed by Principal Daniel Woolf, has been asked to consider the best way to introduce a fall term break for direct-entry undergraduate students in Arts and Science, Engineering, Commerce, and Nursing. It will deliver a comprehensive recommendation to Principal Woolf in February 2017.

More information about the work of the task force can be found on the University Secretariat’s website.

Smith School of Business, COC announce strategic partnership

 

[Smith-COC]
Arash Madani from Rogers Sportsnet speaks with Olympic athletes, from left, Benoit Huot, Ben Russell, Rosie MacLennan and Nicole Forrester at the Smith-COC partnership launch on Nov. 3. (Supplied Photo)

The Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) and Smith School of Business at Queen’s University announced an eight-year strategic partnership on Thursday, Nov. 3, that will provide scholarships for COC athletes, shared coaching synergies and customized leadership training for COC staff and partners.

Smith will be the first business school to become a Team Canada partner and the exclusive provider of business education for the COC.

The announcement was made at Smith’s Toronto campus by COC Chief Executive Officer, Chris Overholt, and David Saunders, Dean of Smith School of Business, with several Olympic athletes in attendance.

“The COC is committed to providing Canada's athletes with the tools they need to be successful on and off the field of play,” says Christopher Overholt, CEO, Canadian Olympic Committee. “Our first ever partnership with an academic institution marks a significant step towards this commitment. We simply cannot ask our athletes to set aside their personal goals and aspirations for sport and for Canada and then not have a plan for them after they are done. We are excited to partner with such a world-class business school.”

Up to 1,200 Game Plan athletes will be eligible for scholarships for a broad range of Smith School of Business programs, such as the Graduate Diploma in Business, the Master of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and Smith’s suite of MBA programs, among others. Programs are offered in a variety of locations across Canada, some with flexible learning options that can accommodate athletes who are still training.

“Smith School of Business students, Olympic and Paralympic athletes have much in common,” says David Saunders, Dean, Smith School of Business. "All are known for their dedication, leadership and performing under pressure, and now they will collaborate and learn from each other in our classrooms. Similarly, we are thrilled to add the best practices of Olympic coaching to the team-based learning experience for all our students.”

Both the COC and Smith share a high-performance coaching culture. By sharing best practices through workshops and networking, Smith will develop “Coaching 2.0” — the next level of coaching to enhance team-based learning and coaching in business education at Smith.

“This partnership will help to solidify the many transferable skills that athletes develop over the course of their competitive careers and open up new career options for Canadian athletes,” says Jennifer Heil, three-time Olympian, two-time Olympic medalist. “I am thrilled to have the opportunity to elevate my skills at a world-class institution and to start the EMBA program at Smith.”

The COC will also invest in enhanced leadership training with Smith for COC staff and other sporting community members through customized and open enrollment executive education programs.

Tracking our trash

Queen's University is required each year to conduct a waste audit and thanks to a new partnership, the task this year has been turned into an experiential learning opportunity for students.

Through the audit, a legislated operational activity required by the Ministry of the Environment, the university is able to calculate the annual waste diversion rate. A total of 44 students from ENSC290 and COMM408 courses volunteered to sort waste and write an essay on their experience in exchange for extra credit.

The audit was conducted from Oct. 4-7 and involved 32 buildings on campus. This year the Sustainability Office and Physical Plant Services partnered with Steven Moore, a Continuing Adjunct with the Smith School of Business who has developed and teaches two sustainability courses, to offer students an experiential learning opportunity by taking part in the waste audit.

As Moore explains, this was hands-on work as the students were required to sort the waste into different streams, weigh the material type and record the data.

While the program offered an experiential learning opportunity, it also opened a lot of eyes among the students.

“The word ‘shocked’ appears a number of times in their comments,” Moore says, pointing to the essays submitted by the participants following the audit. “They only took one day’s waste from each building and I think they were really surprised at how much waste there was and how much was not really waste, including gym shoes, pyjama bottoms, tights and phone cords. I think they were also surprised by how much (of the waste) was perfectly good food in unopened packages – and how much of the waste should have been recycled but wasn’t.”

The final report from the waste audit will be released by the end of the year.

While the program provided a new experience for the students it also will help the university track the effectiveness of its waste diversion programs.  Last year the campus achieved a waste diversion rate of 47 per cent.

“This activity allows us to determine the composition of the waste stream, identify contamination issues and understand the level of participation in the recycling program on campus by user groups. The students assisted with these activities under the direction of GFL Environmental and our office,” says Llynwen Osborne, Recycling Coordinator for the Sustainability Office. “The Sustainability Office was really excited to have so many students participate in auditing the campus waste stream.”

Moore says that the majority of the students took some time to get used to handling the materials, but all were very engaged in the activity and walked away with new insights into the amount of waste that is being tossed away.

“I think it will stick with them,” he says. “I don't think any of them will forget it.”

Waste Reduction Week is marked from Oct. 17-21

To learn more about the Sustainability Office and its initiatives and programs, visit the Queen’s Sustainability website.

Summit making an impact

Today’s university students may be the leaders of tomorrow, but they can always use a bit of guidance and support when it comes to making the right choices.

That’s what the Social Impact Summit aims to provide.

[Social Impact Summit]
Harry Kraemer, former CEO of Baxter International and current Kellogg School of Management professor and best-selling author, speaks to delegates at last year's Social Impact Summit. (Supplied Photo) 

Now in its 12th year, the two-day conference, hosted by the Centre for Social Impact at Smith School of Business on Friday, Oct. 14 and Saturday, Oct. 15, brings together leading academics and practitioners to expose students to a wide variety of issues and topics that will empower them to move forward and make a social impact. This year’s theme is ‘Imagine Possibilities.’

“We are delighted to welcome back so many alumni and speakers who inspire, educate, and build community with our students,” says Tina Dacin, Director, Centre for Social Impact, Smith School of Business.

The event begins with a keynote address on Friday by Juno Award-winning musician and Queen’s alumnus Jim Cuddy of Blue Rodeo. He will be introduced by fellow alumnus Walt Macnee, Vice Chairman of Mastercard and Director of their Centre for Inclusive Growth, who first taught Mr. Cuddy how to play the guitar during their time at Queen’s.

A full day of learning and networking activities follows on Saturday, including morning plenary sessions featuring Mr. Macnee and Jacqueline Prehogan, founder and president of Canada Pooch Ltd. The afternoon offers a series of panel discussions and workshops on topics such as Women in Economic Development, Social Enterprise and Aboriginal Initiatives.

More than 165 delegates are expected to attend the Social Impact Summit, including Queen’s commerce students as well MBA and Master of International Business students, many of whom are enrolled in the Certificate in Responsible Leadership Program.

Visit the Centre for Social Impact for the complete agenda.

The Centre for Social Impact at Smith School of Business was established in 2004 with a mission to educate students and foster outreach, research, and advocacy on issues impacting our local and global communities. Every year, the centre presents and supports a wide range of programming for students, staff, faculty, and members of the Queen’s community to learn more about the processes and practices that drive social impact – including the business practice of responsible leadership and, more recently, social innovation, which refers to an innovative product, process, or program that profoundly and positively changes a social system and is widely recognized as a key driver of solutions to such complex issues. For more information please contact the centre at csi@queensu.ca.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Business