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Current issue of For the Record

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, PhD examination, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

The next issue of For the Record will be published Thursday, Oct. 20. The deadline for submitting information is Tuesday, Oct. 18. For the Record is published bi-weekly throughout the academic year and monthly during the summer.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Senior Communications Officer Wanda Praamsma

Appointments

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

New appointments:

  • Julián Ortiz, Associate Professor, Robert M Buchan Department of Mining – Aug 1, 2016

Faculty of Health Sciences

Daniel W. Howes – Head of the Department of Critical Care Medicine

Dean Richard Reznick is pleased to announce that Benoit-Antoine Bacon, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s University, has appointed Daniel W. Howes as head of the Department of Critical Care Medicine for a five-year period as of Sept.1, 2016.

Dr. Howes completed his undergraduate studies in biology at the University of Guelph and his medical degree at Dalhousie University in 1994. He completed his residency in emergency medicine at Queen’s in 1999, and received a Critical Care Fellowship at Queen’s in 1998. Dr. Howes attended Harvard University’s Macey Institute Program for Health Science Educators in 2006.

Dr. Howes joined Queen’s as an assistant professor in 2001 and is currently a professor in the departments of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Medicine. He is the director of the Clinical Simulation Centre for the School of Medicine, as well as the lead for the Kingston General Hospital RACE team, and serves as the medical director for the Regional Trauma Program of Southeastern Ontario.

Dr. Howes has served in several key roles as part of Kingston and southeastern Ontario’s trauma programs and trauma education programs. He has been the recipient of several teaching awards, including the 2016 H.F. Pross Award, the 2011 Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award, and was Critical Care Teacher of the Year in 2005-06 and 2010-11. He also received the Canadian Association of Medical Educators Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Contributions to Medical Education in 2012.

Dr. Howes is an active researcher, with academic interests in resuscitation, medical education and medical simulation. As an active member of several research teams, Dr. Howes has been involved in multiple funded research initiatives and scholarly publications, and has presented widely at national and international conferences.

Dr. Reznick extends his thanks to John Drover for his leadership and service to the Department of Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Drover has been the leader of Queen's Critical Care Medicine Program for 14 years, and it was through Dr. Drover’s vision and his efforts that Critical Care Medicine was established as a department of Queen’s University in September 2015.

Awards

New inductees for Smith Faculty Hall of Fame announced

Established in 2009, the Faculty Hall of Fame recognizes Smith School of Business faculty members who made significant contributions to the school during their tenure. Outstanding research, exceptional mentoring, and excellent teaching are a few of the accomplishments of the 2016 Faculty Hall of Fame inductees.

Recipients are chosen by a selection committee comprised of the dean, senior university leaders, alumni, as well as current faculty and students.This year’s inductees are:

  • R.G.R (Gordon) Cassidy: 1972-1997
  • R.H (Bob) Crandall: 1961-1990
  • R.L (Rick) Jackson: 1974-2014
  • C.A (Carl) Lawrence: 1963-1991
  • J.E (Ev) Smyth: 1946-1961

All inductees will be honoured at a ceremony in Goodes Hall on Oct. 11. Pen and ink portraits of each member will be displayed in Goodes Hall.

To learn more about the contributions of these inspirational professors, visit the Faculty Hall of Fame website.

Committees

Advisory Committee — Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Queen’s Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon announced that Kimberly Woodhouse’s second five-year term as dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science will end on June 30, 2017, and that Dr. Woodhouse has indicated that she does not wish to be considered for another term. 

Provost Bacon will chair a committee to advise Principal Daniel Woolf on the present state and future prospects of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, and on the selection of the next dean. 

The provost’s office invites letters and commentary regarding the faculty and to suggest individuals to serve on the advisory committee via email to lacey.monk@queensu.ca, until Oct. 10, 2016. Respondents are asked to indicate whether they wish to have their letters shown, in confidence, to the members of the advisory committee.

Headship Selection Committee — Department of Chemical Engineering

James McLellan’s term as head of the Department of Chemical Engineering ends June 30, 2017. 

In accordance with the terms of Article 41 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University, a selection committee will be formed to consider the present state and future prospects of the department, and to assist the provost and vice-principal (academic) in the selection of a department head. Members of the bargaining unit will elect five members. Faculty, staff and students are also invited to nominate staff and students from the Department of Chemical Engineering and faculty from cognate disciplines, for membership on the selection committee. Nominations should be sent to Dean Kim Woodhouse (Chair), c/o Dayna Smith (dayna.smith@queensu.ca) Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science by Oct. 20, 2016.  

Human Resources

Successful Candidates

Job Title: Registered Practical Nurse (USW Local 2010)
Department: Student Wellness Services
Competition: 2016-229
Successful Candidate: Jenna McManus

Job Title: Programs Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Department of Philosophy
Competition: 2016-283
Successful Candidate: Susanne Cliff-Jungling

Job Title: Graduate Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Education
Competition: 2016-258
Successful Candidate: Cassandra Bryce

Job Title: Departmental Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Emergency Medicine
Competition: 2016-263
Successful Candidate: WITHDRAWN

Job Title: Director, Finance - Facilities
Department: Physical Plant Services
Competition: 2016-202
Successful Candidate: Ginette Denford (Student Affairs)

Job Title: Manager, ITS Finance and Administration
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: 2016-208
Successful Candidate: Mary Kemp

Job Title: Administrative Assistant Student Services (USW Local 2010)
Department: Office of the Vice-Provost and Dean Services Affairs
Competition: 2016-230
Successful Candidate: Gail Motut-Plata (Disability Services)

Job Title: Manager, Financial Analysis and Reporting
Department: Financial Services
Competition: 2016-218
Successful Candidate: Michelle Perry

Job Title: Business Analyst, Gift Planning
Department: Development, Gift Planning
Competition: 2016-212
Successful Candidate: Lydia Scholle-Cotton

Job Title: Graduate Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Education
Competition: 2016-261
Successful Candidate: Janice Tsui

5 things to ease the onQ transition

Queen’s new learning management system, onQ, is now fully implemented across campus. IT Services (ITS) and the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) offer numerous supports and encourage instructors to take advantage of the drop-in sessions, workshops, and mobile help unit.

Selina Idlas, onQ Educational Support in the CTL, Margaret Hickling, Solutions Specialist in ITS, and Jacey Carnegie, onQ Transition Lead in ITS, are members of the support team available to help faculty members adjust to the new learning management system.
  1. The new onQ Support website has been developed to support students, instructors, TAs, and support staff in their use of onQ. The site features step-by-step instructions, FAQs, and videos on creating and using onQ courses, as well as links to training workshops and various methods of support.
  1. 24/7 help is available: The university is running a pilot of the End User Support (EUS) feature. Help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by email, chat, or phone. The EUS is operated by staff familiar with all functionality within the D2L or Desire2Learn “Brightspace” platform on which onQ is built. Full details on the support website
  1. Daily drop-ins – now through Sept. 23: The daily drop-ins are held in B205, Mackintosh-Corry Hall (main floor, across from cafeteria) from 10-11 am. Staff are available to answer your onQ questions. These sessions provide you with one-on-one support.
  1. Weekly workshops: These 1.5-hour training sessions cover the basics of setting up a course in onQ and give you the necessary tools to get started in the system.
  1. The Mobile Unit in the Faculty of Arts and Science: This team of students is available to work one-on-one with Arts and Science instructors in their own offices to assist with various administrative tasks within their onQ courses. The students can help with tasks such as: formatting content, setting up the Grade Book, creating Discussions/Topics, uploading videos and files, creating Groups, posting News Items, and creating Rubrics. For more information on the new onQ Mobile Unit, visit the onQ Support website.

September is here and classes have started. Be sure to sign up for onQ Training or stop by a drop-in for help with your onQ course.

 

 

Flags lowered for David Bonham

Flags on campus have been lowered for Professor David Bonham who passed away at home on Sunday, Sept. 11.

[David Bonham]
David Bonham, a former professor and administrator at Queen's University, died Sunday, Sept. 11 at home. (University Communications) 

Professor Bonham was cross-appointed to the Faculty of Law and the School of Business during his 30 years at the university and also served as Vice-Principal (Finance) from 1971-77 and then Vice-Principal (Resources) from 1984-88.

After his retirement from the university, he became a founding member of the Retirees’ Association of Queen’s and was chair of its Pension Committee.

Professor Bonham was also well known within the Kingston community and from 1978 to 2009 was a partner, then counsel, with Cunningham Swan Carty Little and Bonham. He also devoted much time to charitable and volunteer organizations including as Chair of the Anna and Edward C. Churchill Foundation, Vice-Chair of Hospice Kingston, sat on the Board of Directors of University Hospitals Kingston Foundation, and the Board of Hotel Dieu Hospital.

Professor Bonham received both the Padre Laverty and the John Orr awards from Queen’s and most recently received the Distinguished Service Award in 2015.

Visitation will be held at James Reid Funeral Home on John Counter Boulevard, between 2 and 4 p.m. and 7 and 9 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16. His funeral will be held at St. George's Cathedral in Kingston at 11 am Saturday, Sept.  17.

More information is available online

Mining venture strikes gold in pitch contest

  • [RockMass team members]
    RockMass Technologies won first prize at the QICSI Venture Pitch Competition on Aug. 18. The company includes Matas Sriubiskis, Matthew Gubasta, Shelby Yee, Nichola Trinh, Boyang Fu and Rigers Rukaj (left to right).
  • OneSpecies team members Elena Routledge and Kenedy Assman make their presentation during the final pitch competition for the Queen's Innovation Connection Summer Initiative (QICSI).
    OneSpecies team members Elena Routledge and Kenedy Assman make their presentation during the final pitch competition for the Queen's Innovation Connection Summer Initiative (QICSI).
  • Nikita Kopotun unveils the Paperweight team's innovative printer during the final pitch competition.
    Nikita Kopotun unveils the Paperweight team's innovative printer during the final pitch competition.
  • [Kerry Readwin with Laura Yu]
    NorthSprout member Kerry Readwin (Com'17), left, explains her product to Laura Yu, Business Development Manager, Academic Entrepreneurship, with Ontario Centres of Excellence.
  • Team members of Amala answer questions from the judges panel regarding their product  – a yoga mat made with algae  –  at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts on Thursday, Aug. 18.
    Team members of Amala answer questions from the judges panel regarding their product – a yoga mat made with algae – at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts on Thursday, Aug. 18.
  • [Jimmy Hamilton with Neil Longhurst]
    Jimmy Hamilton (Artsci'17), left, a member of OneSpecies, speaks with Neil Longhurst (MBA'77), a QICSI mentor.

Months of hard work and long hours have paid off for the six Queen’s University students who co-founded RockMass Technologies.

The company won the Queen’s Innovation Connector Summer Initiative (QICSI) Venture Pitch Competition, beating out seven other teams for the top prize of $30,000 in seed-funding.

RockMass Technologies is working to improve the safety and efficiency of geological mapping in the mining, civil engineering, and exploration industries. According to the company, the device “automatically maps a rock face while the software analyses the data and breaks it down into key information that is used to determine the structural stability of a tunnel, mine shaft and/or rock face.”

The technology is based on research conducted at Queen’s by Professor Joshua Marshall and PhD candidate Marc Gallant. Dr. Marshall and Mr. Gallant patented the technology through PARTEQ and the QICSI students licensed it.

“We are so fortunate to have this great technology to use. It’s really great to be able to commercialize Queen’s research and take it to market,” says Matas Sriubiskis, Chief Executive Officer of RockMass Technologies. 

Mr. Sriubiskis (Artsci’17) and his teammates Shelby Yee (Sc’16), Chief Operating Officer, Matt Gubasta (Artsci’17), Chief Financial Officer, Boyang Fu (Cmp’16), Lead Software Developer, Rigers Rukaj (Sc’17), Chief Technology Officer, and Nichola Trinh (Sc’17), Chief Business Development Officer, were overjoyed to win the pitch competition. While they savoured the moment with friends and the other QICSI participants, they had already started looking ahead.

“This (win) is fantastic, but we have to keep working,” Mr. Sriubiskis says. “We’re heading to clients’ mines and worksites in September, and we are developing new connections with companies. We are also looking at developing different extensions for our technology as well.”

Three other companies received awards following the pitch competition. The judges awarded $20,000 in seed-funding to both NorthSprout – which developed a gel-based germination medium to allow seeds to grow strong and healthy faster and with less water – and Tandem Therapy – a software platform to support the relationship between therapists and their patients. Paperweight Technologies, which is improving the home printing experience, also won $10,000 in seed-funding.  

QICSI, a 17-week paid internship where students collaborate to launch their own ventures, has existed for five years. Greg Bavington, Executive Director of QIC, says the venture pitches keep getting stronger each year.

“Every year we refine the program to better meet the needs of the students,” Mr. Bavington explains. “And as awareness grows of the Summer Initiative, our flagship program, and our other offerings, we continue to attract high-achieving students and direct them to programs that best fit their needs and interests.”

Visit the QIC website to learn more about its programs. 

At the top of the class

A Nobel Prize, the new Dan School, a Rembrandt, and $50-million to the Smith School of Business.
An exceptional year. Just one of 175. 

[175th anniversary logo]

As summer approaches, high school students from across Canada are deciding where they will pursue post-secondary studies. For many students, their choice will be based on where they will receive the best education and career opportunities. Others will be drawn by the chance to take part in innovative and exciting research opportunities with faculty members who are at the leading edges of their fields.

As one of Canada’s oldest degree-granting institutions, Queen’s has – for 175 years – offered students excellence in undergraduate studies, innovative graduate programs, and a supportive and dynamic learning environment.

From envisioning and designing cutting-edge technology to unlocking the mysteries of the universe, Queen’s is at the forefront of providing a top research and educational experience for students from across the country and around the globe.

This past year saw a number of unprecedented successes for Queen’s:


Dr. Arthur McDonald received the Nobel Prize for unlocking the mysteries of neutrinos.
 

Stephen J.R. Smith’s generous donation to the Smith School of Business helped transform business education.

The donation of a third Rembrandt painting by Alfred and Isabel Bader solidified Queen’s as a destination for the study of European art.

The naming of the Dan School of Drama and Music bolstered Queen’s reputation as a pre-eminent centre for the study of music theatre.


Learn more about how Queen’s promotes excellence in both the classroom and the laboratory: Pairing world-class facilities with talent and funding in The Globe and Mail.

[collage]

It’s no surprise that our students are inspired to achieve their fullest potential at Queen’s.

Queen’s first-year undergraduate retention and graduation rates are among the highest in the country, as 94.3 per cent of first-year undergraduates remain at Queen’s for their studies.

Most importantly, when students graduate, they enter the job market with the skills employers look for and are able to start their careers on the right track.

With 175th anniversary celebrations beginning this fall, Queen’s will keep the momentum of the past year going, and build upon the university’s position as one of Canada’s premier educational institutions. The university encourages faculty and students to strive to achieve their best and aims to continually cultivate an environment that nurtures curiosity and thirst for knowledge.

By building on past successes, Queen’s will continue to provide top-quality education for students, while retaining our place as one of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities.

Queen’s to adopt new academic tool

After extensive consultation and discussions among a variety of groups, Queen’s University has decided to acquire a campus-wide licence for Turnitin, an academic tool that will support student learning and faculty development.

“I am pleased that Queen’s is joining other Ontario institutions that have benefitted from Turnitin,” says Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “The software, available for the fall 2016 term, will provide numerous learning opportunities for both faculty and students.” While the tool is sometimes understood as plagiarism detection software, Dr. Scott says Queen’s will promote it as a formative and developmental opportunity. “Turnitin will help students gain a deeper understanding of academic citation practices while safeguarding academic integrity.”

“Turnitin will enable Queen’s to adopt an educational approach by encouraging students to check for potential issues before submitting their assignments,” says Peter Wolf, Associate Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “In this way, students can learn about ways to ensure they are submitting original work. Over time, supports will be developed for faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students on using Turnitin as an educational tool.”

Representatives from the Office of the Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), IT Services and the Queen’s University Faculty Association evaluated the software and recommended its adoption across the university. Ten Ontario universities, including the University of Toronto, McMaster, Western and Ryerson, currently hold a licence for Turnitin. Smith School of Business and the School of Kinesiology, Queen’s Economics Department and the Department of Psychology have been using Turnitin under an opt-in arrangement.

“We saw the opportunity to take Turnitin from an opt-in service that only a few on campus were using to a full, campus-wide application. This is another way ITS is looking to improve and bolster the best experience possible for our Queen’s community,” says Bo Wandschneider, Chief Information Officer and Associate Vice-Principal (Information Technology Services).

Spring Convocation: Commerce

  • The lone graduating Master of Science and Doctoral students are recognized during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 30. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    The lone graduating Master of Science and Doctoral students are recognized during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 30. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, speaks to the graduating Commerce Class of 2016 during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, speaks to the graduating Commerce Class of 2016 during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Chancellor Jim Leech poses for a photo with a graduating Commerce student, while Rector Cam Yung looks on, during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Chancellor Jim Leech poses for a photo with a graduating Commerce student, while Rector Cam Yung looks on, during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Family members clamour to take a photo of their graduating student during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Family members clamour to take a photo of their graduating student during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Newly-graduated Bachelor of Commerce students gather for a group photo following the Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Newly-graduated Bachelor of Commerce students gather for a group photo following the Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Of the 21 ceremonies held during Queen's University's Spring Convocation only one is hosted outside of Grant Hall.

To facilitate all the graduating Bachelor of Commerce students in a single ceremony, the Smith School of Business takes the celebration to the Main Gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre.

The larger venue also allows for more family and friends to attend, often making for a more lively atmosphere under the bright lights of the ARC.

Spring Convocation continues on Wednesday, June 1.

Salute to Sobey

Queen’s is reserving its honorary degrees in 2016 for alumni in celebration of the university’s 175th anniversary. Throughout spring convocation, The Gazette will profile all 11 honorary degree recipients and explore how Queen’s has impacted their life and career. 

Donald R. Sobey (Com’57) often encourages young students to treat university like a job – eight hours for school work, eight hours for sleep, and eight hours for enjoying the overall experience.

Moments before Mr. Sobey accepted an honorary degree on May 30 in front of commerce and management graduates, he considered the advice he would give them as they enter the next phase of their lives.

“The most important thing I would say is, don’t be afraid to make a mistake. If you aren’t making any mistakes, then you’re not really doing anything,” he says. “If you are intelligent and aware, you will admit your mistake, own it, and not do it again.

“If it’s a real calamity, pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start again,” he adds.

[Donald Sobey after receving his honorary degree]
Donald R. Sobey (Com'57) is an inductee of both the Canadian Business Hall of Fame and the Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame. Mr. Sobey and his son Rob (Artsci'88) have created scholarships to support Atlantic Canadian students who want to study commerce at Queen's. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Mr. Sobey’s positive outlook served him well over his 46-year business career. He joined his father, Frank H. Sobey, and brothers Bill and David in the family grocery business shortly after graduating from Queen’s. He was appointed, in 1963, to the board of Empire Company Limited, the family’s investment company. He became president in 1969 and took on the role of chairman in 1985 until his retirement in 2004.

Turning points

Mr. Sobey was one of only two Atlantic Canadian students at Queen’s when he arrived in 1953. He looks back fondly on the opportunity to experience the world away from home and meet people from all over Canada.

To support other Atlantic Canadian students striving for a similar experience, Mr. Sobey and his son Rob (Artsci’88) created the D&R Sobey Atlantic Scholarship in 1999. Each year, six outstanding high school students are awarded the scholarship to attend the undergraduate commerce program at Smith School of Business.

Since establishing the undergraduate scholarship, Donald and Rob Sobey created an additional scholarship fund for Atlantic Canadian students who want to pursue their MBA at Smith School of Business.

Mr. Sobey says he loved the idea of helping young people directly while giving back to the university where he enjoyed a great learning experience.

“I’m really proud [of the scholarships],” says Mr. Sobey. Father and son return to Queen's every year to attend a dinner with the scholarship recipients, where they enjoy a traditional East Coast meal of lobster. "I enjoy the interactions. They are amazing young people, and you can see the country is in pretty good hands.”

Robert Marsh is one of more than 100 Atlantic Canadian students to receive a D&R Sobey Atlantic Undergraduate Scholarship to date. Mr. Marsh, currently a member of Liberty Canada’s senior executive team, spoke at the convocation ceremony after Mr. Sobey received his honorary degree. He explained that earning the scholarship marked a turning point for him.

“It changed my life,” Mr. Marsh says. “Queen’s was also turning point in Donald Sobey’s life. It gave him the skills and knowledge needed to become a business leader, and he has helped many others benefit from the magic of Queen’s.”

More information about the D&R Sobey Atlantic Scholarship is available online

Spring Convocation: Colourful MBA ceremonies

  • A graduate of the Master of Business Administration program smiles as she is hooded during the Spring Convocation ceremony on Friday, May 27.
    A graduate of the Master of Business Administration program smiles as she is hooded during the Spring Convocation ceremony on Friday, May 27.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to the graduating students and their families at Grant Hall during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation on Friday, May 27.
    Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to the graduating students and their families at Grant Hall during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation on Friday, May 27.
  • Graduating students listen to guest speaker Justice Gloria Epstein during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
    Graduating students listen to guest speaker Justice Gloria Epstein during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
  • While most of the attention is on the graduating students at Spring Convocation, there is time for other family members to make memories.
    While most of the attention is on the graduating students at Spring Convocation, there is time for other family members to make memories.
  • A graduate of the Smith School of Business' Master of Business Administration program is hooded at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
    A graduate of the Smith School of Business' Master of Business Administration program is hooded at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
  • A family member of a graduating student takes a photo from the balcony during Friday's ceremony at Grant Hall
    A family member of a graduating student takes a photo from the balcony during Friday's ceremony at Grant Hall

Spring Convocation got underway once again at Queen’s University with the third and fourth ceremonies being held at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.

It was a special day for the Smith School of Business as the graduates of the Master of Business Administration programs (Cornell-Queen’s; Executive; Queen’s; and Accelerated) celebrated with their families.

There are a total of 21 ceremonies during Spring Convocation. The fifth will be held on Monday at the Athletics and Recreation Centre Main Gym. 

Celebrating a historic decade of philanthropy

Funds donated during the Initiative Campaign have furthered the university’s top priorities in teaching, research and athletics and recreation.

Queen’s University is celebrating the success of the Initiative Campaign, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in its 175-year history, which concluded on April 30, 2016. Thanks to the collective dedication and generosity of volunteers and donors, more than $640 million has been donated to Queen’s University during the 10-year Initiative Campaign, surpassing the $500 million goal set at the beginning of the campaign in 2006.

Queen's Bands enter during the Initiative Campaign launch event held inside Grant Hall in October 2012. Queen's is celebrating the successful conclusion of the Initiative Campaign, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the university's 175-year history. (University Communications) 

“This is a proud moment in Queen’s history. The university is enormously grateful to all of our volunteers and donors who recognize the value of a Queen’s education, and have invested in making one of Canada’s top universities even better,” says Daniel Woolf, Queen’s Principal and Vice Chancellor.  

More than 60,000 individual donors, including 35,000 alumni, contributed to the campaign since it was launched in 2006. Funds donated during the Initiative Campaign have furthered the university’s top priorities in teaching, research and athletics and recreation.

Over $85 million has been used to support student assistance programs, including the creation of 473 new student awards and 22 new chairs and professorships. Campuses and facilities at Queen’s have already improved greatly as a result of donations during the Initiative Campaign with further investments to be made in a number of priority areas.

“I would like to extend my most sincere gratitude to the volunteers, donors, alumni and supporters who have contributed to the Initiative Campaign over the past 10 years,” says Gord Nixon, Chair of the Initiative Campaign. “Their efforts have contributed greatly to the campaign, and the excitement and momentum that inspires others to make the same commitment to Queen’s.”

Campuses and facilities at Queen’s have improved greatly as a result of donations during the Initiative Campaign. These investments support the university’s programs and its people, including experiences beyond the classroom that enable the Queen’s community to make a significant impact on society as an informed citizenry, nationally and internationally.

In addition to the funds raised, support from the three levels of government provided an additional $94 million that was not included in the Initiative Campaign total. Queen’s partnered with the federal and provincial governments to build Queen’s School of Medicine, and received support from the federal, provincial and municipal governments to bring the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts to fruition. This support was essential in making these projects possible and the university is enormously grateful for these investments.

More than $115 million has been committed in future estate gifts against the university’s parallel goal of $100 million, which is counted outside of the Initiative Campaign total.

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