Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Business

At the top of the class

A Nobel Prize, the new Dan School, a Rembrandt, and $50-million to the Smith School of Business.
An exceptional year. Just one of 175. 

[175th anniversary logo]

As summer approaches, high school students from across Canada are deciding where they will pursue post-secondary studies. For many students, their choice will be based on where they will receive the best education and career opportunities. Others will be drawn by the chance to take part in innovative and exciting research opportunities with faculty members who are at the leading edges of their fields.

As one of Canada’s oldest degree-granting institutions, Queen’s has – for 175 years – offered students excellence in undergraduate studies, innovative graduate programs, and a supportive and dynamic learning environment.

From envisioning and designing cutting-edge technology to unlocking the mysteries of the universe, Queen’s is at the forefront of providing a top research and educational experience for students from across the country and around the globe.

This past year saw a number of unprecedented successes for Queen’s:


Dr. Arthur McDonald received the Nobel Prize for unlocking the mysteries of neutrinos.
 

Stephen J.R. Smith’s generous donation to the Smith School of Business helped transform business education.

The donation of a third Rembrandt painting by Alfred and Isabel Bader solidified Queen’s as a destination for the study of European art.

The naming of the Dan School of Drama and Music bolstered Queen’s reputation as a pre-eminent centre for the study of music theatre.


Learn more about how Queen’s promotes excellence in both the classroom and the laboratory: Pairing world-class facilities with talent and funding in The Globe and Mail.

[collage]

It’s no surprise that our students are inspired to achieve their fullest potential at Queen’s.

Queen’s first-year undergraduate retention and graduation rates are among the highest in the country, as 94.3 per cent of first-year undergraduates remain at Queen’s for their studies.

Most importantly, when students graduate, they enter the job market with the skills employers look for and are able to start their careers on the right track.

With 175th anniversary celebrations beginning this fall, Queen’s will keep the momentum of the past year going, and build upon the university’s position as one of Canada’s premier educational institutions. The university encourages faculty and students to strive to achieve their best and aims to continually cultivate an environment that nurtures curiosity and thirst for knowledge.

By building on past successes, Queen’s will continue to provide top-quality education for students, while retaining our place as one of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities.

Queen’s to adopt new academic tool

After extensive consultation and discussions among a variety of groups, Queen’s University has decided to acquire a campus-wide licence for Turnitin, an academic tool that will support student learning and faculty development.

“I am pleased that Queen’s is joining other Ontario institutions that have benefitted from Turnitin,” says Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “The software, available for the fall 2016 term, will provide numerous learning opportunities for both faculty and students.” While the tool is sometimes understood as plagiarism detection software, Dr. Scott says Queen’s will promote it as a formative and developmental opportunity. “Turnitin will help students gain a deeper understanding of academic citation practices while safeguarding academic integrity.”

“Turnitin will enable Queen’s to adopt an educational approach by encouraging students to check for potential issues before submitting their assignments,” says Peter Wolf, Associate Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “In this way, students can learn about ways to ensure they are submitting original work. Over time, supports will be developed for faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students on using Turnitin as an educational tool.”

Representatives from the Office of the Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), IT Services and the Queen’s University Faculty Association evaluated the software and recommended its adoption across the university. Ten Ontario universities, including the University of Toronto, McMaster, Western and Ryerson, currently hold a licence for Turnitin. Smith School of Business and the School of Kinesiology, Queen’s Economics Department and the Department of Psychology have been using Turnitin under an opt-in arrangement.

“We saw the opportunity to take Turnitin from an opt-in service that only a few on campus were using to a full, campus-wide application. This is another way ITS is looking to improve and bolster the best experience possible for our Queen’s community,” says Bo Wandschneider, Chief Information Officer and Associate Vice-Principal (Information Technology Services).

Spring Convocation: Commerce

  • The lone graduating Master of Science and Doctoral students are recognized during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 30. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    The lone graduating Master of Science and Doctoral students are recognized during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 30. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, speaks to the graduating Commerce Class of 2016 during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, speaks to the graduating Commerce Class of 2016 during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Chancellor Jim Leech poses for a photo with a graduating Commerce student, while Rector Cam Yung looks on, during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Chancellor Jim Leech poses for a photo with a graduating Commerce student, while Rector Cam Yung looks on, during Monday's Spring Convocation ceremony. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Family members clamour to take a photo of their graduating student during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Family members clamour to take a photo of their graduating student during the Spring Convocation ceremony held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Newly-graduated Bachelor of Commerce students gather for a group photo following the Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Newly-graduated Bachelor of Commerce students gather for a group photo following the Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre on Monday, May 25. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Of the 21 ceremonies held during Queen's University's Spring Convocation only one is hosted outside of Grant Hall.

To facilitate all the graduating Bachelor of Commerce students in a single ceremony, the Smith School of Business takes the celebration to the Main Gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre.

The larger venue also allows for more family and friends to attend, often making for a more lively atmosphere under the bright lights of the ARC.

Spring Convocation continues on Wednesday, June 1.

Salute to Sobey

Queen’s is reserving its honorary degrees in 2016 for alumni in celebration of the university’s 175th anniversary. Throughout spring convocation, The Gazette will profile all 11 honorary degree recipients and explore how Queen’s has impacted their life and career. 

Donald R. Sobey (Com’57) often encourages young students to treat university like a job – eight hours for school work, eight hours for sleep, and eight hours for enjoying the overall experience.

Moments before Mr. Sobey accepted an honorary degree on May 30 in front of commerce and management graduates, he considered the advice he would give them as they enter the next phase of their lives.

“The most important thing I would say is, don’t be afraid to make a mistake. If you aren’t making any mistakes, then you’re not really doing anything,” he says. “If you are intelligent and aware, you will admit your mistake, own it, and not do it again.

“If it’s a real calamity, pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start again,” he adds.

[Donald Sobey after receving his honorary degree]
Donald R. Sobey (Com'57) is an inductee of both the Canadian Business Hall of Fame and the Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame. Mr. Sobey and his son Rob (Artsci'88) have created scholarships to support Atlantic Canadian students who want to study commerce at Queen's. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Mr. Sobey’s positive outlook served him well over his 46-year business career. He joined his father, Frank H. Sobey, and brothers Bill and David in the family grocery business shortly after graduating from Queen’s. He was appointed, in 1963, to the board of Empire Company Limited, the family’s investment company. He became president in 1969 and took on the role of chairman in 1985 until his retirement in 2004.

Turning points

Mr. Sobey was one of only two Atlantic Canadian students at Queen’s when he arrived in 1953. He looks back fondly on the opportunity to experience the world away from home and meet people from all over Canada.

To support other Atlantic Canadian students striving for a similar experience, Mr. Sobey and his son Rob (Artsci’88) created the D&R Sobey Atlantic Scholarship in 1999. Each year, six outstanding high school students are awarded the scholarship to attend the undergraduate commerce program at Smith School of Business.

Since establishing the undergraduate scholarship, Donald and Rob Sobey created an additional scholarship fund for Atlantic Canadian students who want to pursue their MBA at Smith School of Business.

Mr. Sobey says he loved the idea of helping young people directly while giving back to the university where he enjoyed a great learning experience.

“I’m really proud [of the scholarships],” says Mr. Sobey. Father and son return to Queen's every year to attend a dinner with the scholarship recipients, where they enjoy a traditional East Coast meal of lobster. "I enjoy the interactions. They are amazing young people, and you can see the country is in pretty good hands.”

Robert Marsh is one of more than 100 Atlantic Canadian students to receive a D&R Sobey Atlantic Undergraduate Scholarship to date. Mr. Marsh, currently a member of Liberty Canada’s senior executive team, spoke at the convocation ceremony after Mr. Sobey received his honorary degree. He explained that earning the scholarship marked a turning point for him.

“It changed my life,” Mr. Marsh says. “Queen’s was also turning point in Donald Sobey’s life. It gave him the skills and knowledge needed to become a business leader, and he has helped many others benefit from the magic of Queen’s.”

More information about the D&R Sobey Atlantic Scholarship is available online

Spring Convocation: Colourful MBA ceremonies

  • A graduate of the Master of Business Administration program smiles as she is hooded during the Spring Convocation ceremony on Friday, May 27.
    A graduate of the Master of Business Administration program smiles as she is hooded during the Spring Convocation ceremony on Friday, May 27.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to the graduating students and their families at Grant Hall during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation on Friday, May 27.
    Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to the graduating students and their families at Grant Hall during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation on Friday, May 27.
  • Graduating students listen to guest speaker Justice Gloria Epstein during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
    Graduating students listen to guest speaker Justice Gloria Epstein during the third ceremony of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
  • While most of the attention is on the graduating students at Spring Convocation, there is time for other family members to make memories.
    While most of the attention is on the graduating students at Spring Convocation, there is time for other family members to make memories.
  • A graduate of the Smith School of Business' Master of Business Administration program is hooded at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
    A graduate of the Smith School of Business' Master of Business Administration program is hooded at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.
  • A family member of a graduating student takes a photo from the balcony during Friday's ceremony at Grant Hall
    A family member of a graduating student takes a photo from the balcony during Friday's ceremony at Grant Hall

Spring Convocation got underway once again at Queen’s University with the third and fourth ceremonies being held at Grant Hall on Friday, May 27.

It was a special day for the Smith School of Business as the graduates of the Master of Business Administration programs (Cornell-Queen’s; Executive; Queen’s; and Accelerated) celebrated with their families.

There are a total of 21 ceremonies during Spring Convocation. The fifth will be held on Monday at the Athletics and Recreation Centre Main Gym. 

Celebrating a historic decade of philanthropy

Funds donated during the Initiative Campaign have furthered the university’s top priorities in teaching, research and athletics and recreation.

Queen’s University is celebrating the success of the Initiative Campaign, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in its 175-year history, which concluded on April 30, 2016. Thanks to the collective dedication and generosity of volunteers and donors, more than $640 million has been donated to Queen’s University during the 10-year Initiative Campaign, surpassing the $500 million goal set at the beginning of the campaign in 2006.

Queen's Bands enter during the Initiative Campaign launch event held inside Grant Hall in October 2012. Queen's is celebrating the successful conclusion of the Initiative Campaign, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the university's 175-year history. (University Communications) 

“This is a proud moment in Queen’s history. The university is enormously grateful to all of our volunteers and donors who recognize the value of a Queen’s education, and have invested in making one of Canada’s top universities even better,” says Daniel Woolf, Queen’s Principal and Vice Chancellor.  

More than 60,000 individual donors, including 35,000 alumni, contributed to the campaign since it was launched in 2006. Funds donated during the Initiative Campaign have furthered the university’s top priorities in teaching, research and athletics and recreation.

Over $85 million has been used to support student assistance programs, including the creation of 473 new student awards and 22 new chairs and professorships. Campuses and facilities at Queen’s have already improved greatly as a result of donations during the Initiative Campaign with further investments to be made in a number of priority areas.

“I would like to extend my most sincere gratitude to the volunteers, donors, alumni and supporters who have contributed to the Initiative Campaign over the past 10 years,” says Gord Nixon, Chair of the Initiative Campaign. “Their efforts have contributed greatly to the campaign, and the excitement and momentum that inspires others to make the same commitment to Queen’s.”

Campuses and facilities at Queen’s have improved greatly as a result of donations during the Initiative Campaign. These investments support the university’s programs and its people, including experiences beyond the classroom that enable the Queen’s community to make a significant impact on society as an informed citizenry, nationally and internationally.

In addition to the funds raised, support from the three levels of government provided an additional $94 million that was not included in the Initiative Campaign total. Queen’s partnered with the federal and provincial governments to build Queen’s School of Medicine, and received support from the federal, provincial and municipal governments to bring the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts to fruition. This support was essential in making these projects possible and the university is enormously grateful for these investments.

More than $115 million has been committed in future estate gifts against the university’s parallel goal of $100 million, which is counted outside of the Initiative Campaign total.

Setting the wheels in motion

[Whee-Bike team]
The Whee-Bike project team included Jane Shui, Com'16, Andrew Breslin, Sc'17, Bryce Lomfield, Sc'17, Thiago De Oliveira, Sc'17, Daniel Jones, Sc'17, Callum O'Shaughnessy, Sc'17, Hayden Provias, Sc'17, Jeremie Jollivet, Sci'17, and Korrah Bland, Sc'17, (back row, left to right); Sam Milner, Sc'17, Oda Al-anizi, Artsci'18 and Razvan Vulcu, Com'16. (University Communications)

Oda Al-anizi (Artsci’18) has dreamed for years of a better way to get around in his wheelchair. Public transportation has never really granted him the freedom he desires and a specialized motor vehicle is out of the question because of various obstacles, most notably cost.

[Whee-Bike]
An early prototype of the Whee-Bike (Supplied Photo)

As he saw more and more electric bikes and scooters on the road, Mr. Al-anizi wondered if a similar device for wheelchair users might be the answer. He envisioned driving his wheelchair onto a motorized vehicle that would help him get to his destinations more quickly and efficiently.

“I really believe there’s a spot in the market for a device like this,” Mr. Al-anizi says. “For people like me who want to go to work or go to school, it’s too complicated. My hope is that this device is considered an e-bike so you’re not going to need a driver’s licence or insurance and there will be no gas costs. It will be extremely cost effective.”

Mr. Al-anizi reached out to Queen’s Innovation Connector (QIC) in January 2015 to make that idea a reality. QIC connected the student with Enactus Queen’s, a student group dedicated to using entrepreneurial action to transform lives and shape a more sustainable world.

Queen's Innovation Connector

Jane Shui (Com’16) and Razvan Vulcu (Com’16), co-chairs of Enactus Queen’s, were supportive of Mr. Al-anizi’s vision. The co-chairs formed Whee-Bike along with Callum O’Shaughnessy (Sc’17) and Thiago De Oliveira (Sc’17). In addition to the executive, the project team boasts a team of dedicated electrical and mechanical engineering students. As the project has progressed, the team has consulted with occupational therapy and public policy students.

“Working with students from different faculties and disciplines has been a great learning opportunity,” Ms. Shui says. “We don’t get nearly enough chances in our programs to interact with people from different backgrounds.”

Over the past several months, the students have designed a vehicle that resembles a chariot. A person in a wheelchair would board the vehicle from the back using a ramp powered by Bluetooth technology. Once in, the wheelchair would be secured using Q’Straint, a system developed by a team of students and specialists at Queen’s in the 1980s. The person would then operate the electric vehicle using hand controls.

As they developed the plans, the students consulted several faculty advisors including Dr. Ron Anderson, who researches vehicle dynamics, and Dr. Kevin Deluzio, who specializes in the biomechanics of human locomotion. The students have accessed 3D drawing software thanks to a sponsorship with Dassault Systemes and have also received financial support from QIC as part of QyourVenture and mentorship from Executive Director Greg Bavington. The team will be participating in the QIC Summer Initiative Bootcamp beginning next week as part of its QyourVenture training.

The variety of resources has given the students the support they need to apply what they have learned in the classroom over the past several years.

“For a lot of the engineering students working on this project, this is our first step outside of academia,” Mr. De Oliveira says. “It’s the first time where we’re not talking about grades, but something that’s real and going to help people. That’s amazing and great.”

The project received positive feedback during a recent Enactus regional exposition held in Mississauga. The team won an impact award and $500 during the Scotiabank Youth Empowerment Challenge, a competition that sees students develop and deliver projects that address the needs and opportunities facing youth, as it relates to education, learning skills and lifelong success.

“The award signals that the judges felt the project has the potential to have a significant impact on Oda and other youth,” Mr. Vulcu says. “Just as importantly, we received good feedback from the judges on various aspects of the project and how to polish our presentation.”

Over the summer, the students intend to assemble the prototype. They are also working on meeting the regulatory requirements set out in Ontario legislation and developing a marketing strategy.

If you are interested in learning more about the Whee-Bike Project, please email Mr. De Oliveira.

Queen’s team wins international case competition

[KPMG International Case Competition Winners]
Queen's commerce students, from left, Alexis Frey, Abigail Chau, Nicolas Bernal, and Stephane Gosselin, won this year’s KPMG International Case Competition. (Photo courtesy KPMG)

A team of students from the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University has won an international business case competition held in Dubai, UAE.

The team of Alexis Frey, Abigail Chau, Nicolas Bernal, and Stephane Gosselin, all Com’18, came out on top of the more than 390 university teams from 22 countries that applied to the 2016 KPMG International Case Competition (KICC) held April 11-14.

The Queen’s team was invited to represent Canada in the international final after winning the Ace the Case National Competition, which was held in March.

The four-day international competition challenged teams to develop innovative solutions to real-world challenges in the luxury hotel industry. The Smith foursome beat out teams from Australia and Serbia in the final round, marking the first time a team representing KPMG Canada has won this prestigious international competition. 

Campus lunch delivery plan a winner

A proposal for a subscription-based campus lunch delivery service claimed the top prize at this year’s Paul and Tom Kinnear Business Plan Competition.

[Maggie Shi]
Maggie Shi (Com'18) recently won the Paul and Tom Kinnear Business Plan Competition.

Maggie Shi’s (Com’18) business plan stood out among the submissions at the annual contest, established in 2008 by Tom Kinnear (Com’66, LLD’02). The final phase of the competition saw four teams vie for a $5,000 prize to support the establishment or ongoing operation of their business venture.

Ms. Shi will be using the funds to develop her business throughout the summer months and expects to officially launch the venture, named bnto, this fall.

The other finalists were:

  • Iris TechnologiesColin Harding (Com’17); Conor Ross (Artsci’16); and David Cashin (Artsci’16).
  • Lumos Energy StripsHeather Wilcocks-Gynn (Com’17); Chris Angelatos (Sc’16); Lexi Kaplin (Sc’16); and Peter Lyons (Sc’16).
  • Spreza TechnologiesHeather Evans (Com’16); and Daniel Lloyd (Sc’16).

The judging for the competition was conducted by Samit Sharma (MBA’02), Founder/Director of Gaia Power Inc.; Ramzi Asfour (MBA’09), Manager of Commercial Development at PARTEQ Innovations; and Matthew Reesor, Director of Strategic Planning & New Initiatives at Smith School of Business.

The Kinnear Business Plan Competition is open to all undergraduate students at the Smith School of Business who either have an ongoing venture or are in the process of establishing a venture. Teams that have members who are not commerce students are eligible provided that the commerce student is an integral part of the founding team. 

A life in public service

  • Deputy Premier of Ontario and President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews, along with Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, speak with a student following their presentation.
    Deputy Premier of Ontario and President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews, along with Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, speak with a student following their presentation.
  • President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews and Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, speak during a Master of Public Administration class.
    President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews and Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, speak during a Master of Public Administration class.
  • Guest speaker Deputy Premier of Ontario and President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews talks about life in the public service on Wednesday, March 30.
    Guest speaker Deputy Premier of Ontario and President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews talks about life in the public service on Wednesday, March 30.
  • President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews and Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, were the guest speakers for a class in Leading Change in the Public Sector.
    President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews and Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, were the guest speakers for a class in Leading Change in the Public Sector.

Deputy Premier of Ontario and President of the Treasury Board Deb Matthews, along with Deputy Minister of the Treasury Board Secretariat Greg Orencsak, visited Queen's University on Wednesday, March 30, as the guest speakers for a School of Policy Studies class on Leading Change in the Public Sector in the Master of Public Administration.

During the event the two talked about the relationship between elected and non-elected officials and answered a number of questions from the students.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Business