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Insights, advice and a song for Major Admission Awards

  • [Admission Awards - Abrams Brothers]
    John and James Abrams of The Abrams Brothers perform during the Major Admission Awards Reception held Monday, Sept 22 at Wallace Hall.
  • [Admission Awards - Abrams Brothers]
    John and James Abrams of The Abrams Brothers perform during the Major Admission Awards Reception.
  • [Admission Awards - Abrams Brothers]
    John and James Abrams stand alongside Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), during the Major Admission Awards Reception.
  • [Admission Awards - Haley Kawaja]
    Haley Kawaja, a Chernoff Family Award Scholar, speaks during the Major Admission Awards Reception as Ann Tierney and Alan Harrison look on.
  • [Admission Awards Reception]
    Donato Santeramo, Department Head for Languages, Literatures & Cultures, speaks to students at the Major Admission Awards Reception.
  • [Admission Awards - Ann Tierney]
    Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, emceees the Major Admission Awards Reception at Wallace Hall.
  • [Admission Awards Reception]
    Students and faculty members attend the Major Admission Awards Reception held Monday, Sept. 22 at Wallace Hall.

A pair of upper year students offered their advice and personal insights Monday evening as Queen’s recognized its major admission award recipients at a reception. 

Both John Abrams and Haley Kawaja are award recipients themselves but have taken very different paths in their education and lives.

Mr. Abrams, a Chancellor’s Scholar from Kingston, is in his third year majoring in Film and Media with a minor in English Language and Literature.

However, he is better known as half of The Abrams Brothers, a country music duo named Best New Artist at the 2012 Canadian Country Music Awards. He and his brother James performed a song for the gathered crowd at Wallace Hall.  

His message was that many people, past and present, may have the ability to study at the university level but may not have the means. It was a message he related through the stories of his grandparents and parents. His father, now a judge, studied law after a career in the RCMP. Mr. Abrams recalled going to his father’s classes at Queen’s when he was a mere three years old.

“Most importantly for me, I recognize that in my generation a lot of us have what I would consider a misplaced sense of entitlement,” he says. “I observe that and I try every day to remember that I am not necessarily entitled to this, that this is a wonderful privilege to be here at this institution, to have this scholarship. As a result I carry myself accordingly and try and work as hard as I can to live up to those expectations and responsibilities.”

Ms. Kawaja, a Chernoff Family Award Scholar from Cornerbrook, N.L., is a fourth-year biology student with a minor in English Language and Literature.

She too has not taken the conventional path in her education, having taken a year away from her studies to live in Kenya, where she developed an educational program for HIV prevention.

Her message was that it was okay to not know what you want, a pressure that many award recipients and Queen’s students may feel.

“I wanted to get across that your plans are always made by a less mature version of yourself,” she says. “You make a plan in high school for the next four years, then in four years your plan hasn’t accounted for everything you learn over that time. More than anything, (my message is) it’s okay to not know what you want and to change your plan.”

Currently, there are 251 entering and in-course award recipients at Queen’s, hailing from coast to coast and across all faculties and departments.  

“Major Admission Award recipients are those who are engaged within their high schools and/or communities, demonstrate outstanding leadership abilities, possess creativity and initiative, and excel academically.  They continue to demonstrate these attributes throughout their time here," says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, who emceed the event. “Each year, the selection committee has to work harder to make its decisions, because of the calibre of students who apply to Queen's.”

The awards are generously supported by numerous donors.  Many donors want to give back this way because they too received some form of support, recognition and encouragement when they were students. Their generosity has a significant impact within the Queen's community and the recipients of their awards.

The 2015-16 Major Admission Award application is now open for students applying to Queen's for the 2015-16 academic year. The deadline to apply is Dec. 1, 2014. Visit the Student Awards website for further information about our Major Admission Awards.

Principal Woolf announces his priorities for 2014-2015

At the beginning of each academic year it has been my practice to outline for the community, in broad strokes, the goals and priorities I intend to pursue over the course of the year. These goals are, unsurprisingly, aligned with the four strategic drivers identified in the Queen’s University Strategic Framework 2014-2019, a document that will guide the university’s decision making over the next five years.

Principal Daniel Woolf speaks with students during an event on campus. Strengthening the student learning experience is one of his goals for the 2014-15 academic year.

As I commence my second term as Principal my overarching goal remains unchanged-- to advance Queen’s as a university that uniquely combines quality and intensity of research with excellence in undergraduate and graduate education. The strategic drivers – the student learning experience, research prominence, financial sustainability and internationalization – directly support the success of Queen’s as a balanced academy.

It should be noted that the framework builds on and is fully aligned with The Third Juncture, a 10-year vision for Queen’s that I wrote in 2012, as well as a number of other recent planning documents including the Academic Plan (2011), the Strategic Research Plan (2012), the Teaching and Learning Action Plan (2014), and the Campus Master Plan.

In this context, my senior administrative colleagues and I are committed to:

1. Strengthening the student learning experience

A transformative learning experience is central to the Queen’s identity and to our vision as a university. Our academic plan outlines the centrality of developing our students’ fundamental academic skills while also providing them with learning opportunities that will help prepare them for the future. Goals related to this priority include:

  • Increasing the number of new opportunities for expanded credentials, as well as more opportunities for experiential and entrepreneurial learning, both on and off campus.
  • Further integrating technology into the delivery of course content where it enables improved learning.
  • Continuing to focus on strategies for teaching and learning based on student engagement and broad-based learning outcomes.

2. Strengthening our research prominence

Queen’s is recognized as one of Canada’s outstanding research institutions, but sustaining and enhancing our status means we must guide and support our research enterprise while resolutely pursuing funding. Goals related to this priority include:

  • Maintaining success rates in applications for Tri-Council funding.
  • Remaining among the country’s top three universities for faculty awards, honours and prizes, and election to major learned bodies such as the Royal Society of Canada.
  • Supporting the development and engagement of Queen’s faculty members as set out in the Senate-approved Strategic Research Plan.

3. Ensuring financial sustainability

To support teaching and research into the future, we will need stable and diverse revenue streams, particularly as government funding, per student, continues to fall. Goals related to this priority include:

  • Continuing strong revenue growth together with revenue diversification.
  • Meeting our $60 million annual fund raising target as part of the Initiative Campaign, while focusing on its overall achievement by 2016.
  • Pursuing long-term sustainability for our pension plan.

4. Raising our international profile

Two years ago I stated in The Third Juncture that as global competition among universities increases over the next decade, it will not be sufficient to be simply ‘known’ in one’s own country. Increasingly, the value of our students’ degrees will be tied to our international reputation, as will our ability to attract international students, who raise our profile and contribute a great deal to the academic environment. Goals related to this priority include:

  • Moving forward on multi-year plans to increase undergraduate international enrolment.
  • Maintaining our strong record in attracting international graduate students.
  • Supporting growth in international collaborations and partnerships.

5. Promoting and developing talent

We will need to ensure that we are able to acquire, develop and retain top quality faculty and staff to thrive as an institution. Our talent management strategy, which I initiated last year, will provide a strategic approach to ensure we have the right leaders in place and in the wings as we advance our academic mission and work to secure financial sustainability. Goals related to this priority include:

  • Continuing with succession planning efforts for academic and administrative leadership roles across the university.
  • Developing a competency model that will be used to identify necessary competencies when hiring, and for leadership development and performance dialogue discussions.
  • Refining our hiring practices.
  • Promoting discussion among the Deans around faculty renewal. 

A unique take on street art

  • Stopping by the exhibit were Stephen Elliott (Dean, Faculty of Education, l), Rebecca Luce-Kapler (Associate Dean, Faculty of Education) and Peter Chin (Associate Dean, Faculty of Education).
  • Artist in residence Nancy Douglas discusses the mural with Stephen Elliott.
  • Artist in residence Nancy Douglas explains the project to Angela Solar (Faculty of Education) and visitor Mandy Marciniak.
  • The mural was created by students from Frontenac and First Avenue Public Schools.
  • The mural mounted on a floor gave viewers a unique top-down view of the artwork.
  • First-year education students Alexandra Brickman (l) and Victoria Courtney stopped by the gallery.

Students from Frontenac Public School and First Avenue Public School converged on The Studio Gallery at Queen’s Faculty of Education Tuesday for the unveiling of the 210 square foot mural representing their neighbourhood. The project, titled My Magical Neighbourhood, includes contributions from Grade 4 students.

“We normally pull from the Queen’s Education artistic pool for shows in this space, but this is a great opportunity to engage the community,” says Angela Solar, lecturer in the Faculty of Education and the curator of The Studio Gallery at Queen’s Faculty of Education “It also gives our teacher candidates a chance to see what children are learning about art. It’s an amazing experience.”

Led by Limestone District School Board’s artist in residence Nancy Douglas, the project encouraged the students to look at their neighbourhood through a different lens.

“This is a really wonderful experience for the students,” says Ms. Douglas. “They hadn’t seen the mural all together and mounted until today. It makes a huge impact on their lives with the public here, the media here and teachers and other students visiting the gallery.”

Ms. Douglas tackled the project in different stages. The students first had to sketch their home. Then they had to write a fable or a story about their home and neighbourhood. Next, she took them on a walking tour of their neighbourhood to learn about their surroundings. Finally, the students got together, designed the mural and created each panel representing where they live.

The show runs weekdays from 11 am to 2 pm until Oct. 10.

Flags lowered for Larry Miller

Flags on campus are lowered in memory of Larry Miller, professor emeritus in the Faculty of Education.

Mr. Miller began his career at the Faculty of Education in 1975 and retired in 2001. His teaching and research interests included the use of technology in schools, children who read and write prior to school entrance and the translations of reading/writing theory to practice. For many years he carried out investigations into teachers' and children's use of computers, pursuing such topics as the use of CD-ROM talking books, multimedia composing and integrated learning systems. Mr. Miller was also the recipient of the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1998-99.

This story will be updated when funeral arrangements become available.

New courses focus on experiential learning

The 2014-15 academic year comes with a host of new course offerings from the Queen’s faculties, many of which have been adapted to new teaching subjects and practices.

“Queen’s makes providing students a transformative learning experience a top priority,” says Dr. Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “We’re proud that our faculties are constantly enhancing their offerings, whether in terms of bringing in new research in the field, integrating transferable skills or expanding experiential opportunities in the classroom. Every semester brings fresh ideas and innovative pedagogies.”

The following are a selection of new Queen’s courses.

Faculty of Arts and Science

HIST 212 - Experiential Learning in Historical Practice
Offers credit for non-academic work in historical practice at locations such as museums, archives, historic sites, etc. Students must write a proposal prior to the work experience and a report after its completion.

RELS 268 - Religion and Bioethics
Studies the moral and religious norms of ethical judgment in bio-medicine; specific issues will be chosen such as population control, abortion, genetic control, experimentation, consent, behaviour control, death and euthanasia.

Faculty of Education

GDPI 811 – Innovation in Teaching and Learning
Helps students develop a foundational understanding of innovation in the workplace grounded in exploration of historical, sociological, and philosophical contexts and frameworks. Student will explore case studies and develop a plan of action rooted in the particular needs of their workplace.

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

APSC 223 – Global Project Management at the Castle
Covers the knowledge areas and processes of project management with a focus on a practical and applied approach. The course utilizes the global city of London, its engineering firms, experts, practitioners and massive engineering undertakings (The Shard, Cross-Rail, the Eurotunnel, the Thames Barrier, etc.) to investigate the problems, challenges and successes of managing global engineering projects.

CIVL 372 – Water and Wastewater Engineering
Introduces the general concepts of water/wastewater engineering for the protection of human and ecosystem health. Alternative and innovation urban water management strategies will be discussed and emerging issues for water managers will be introduced.

Faculty of Health Sciences

The Queen’s University Accelerated Route to Medical School (QuARMS) program has been improved for its second year of operation. Along with a full slate of courses in an Arts and Science Honours degree program, QuARMS students now have access to additional courses in topics like Population and Global Health and Skin and Special Senses. Continuing this year will be the First Patient Project, where students are partnered with and learn from a patient in the community, as well as Patient Contact in Internal Medicine, where students work with an internal medicine physician on the examination and observation skills. 

Faculty of Law

LAW 527 – Queen’s Family Law Clinic
Students provides services at the Family Law Clinic, providing legal advice, assistance, information and representation to low income individuals in the Kingston area involved with the family justice system. Instruction is provided through lectures and class discussion, simulation exercises in interviewing and advocacy and individual supervision of student casework by the clinic’s project director.

School of Business

COMM 356 – Gender and Diversity in Organizations
Studies diversity and difference in the workplace, and emphasizes the importance of equity and inclusivity in modern organizations. Classes are discussion-focused and will help students grow comfortable discussing, addressing and managing issues of gender and diversity in their careers and organizations.

COMM 433 – Marketing Analytics
Explores the technological and marketing innovations that have been enabled by the advent of “big data.” This course equips students to transform information to insight and insight into shrewd judgement, allowing them to make better marketing and resource allocation decisions. 

Sweet win for incoming Queen's student

Jennifer Brown (ConEd’15) arrives at Queen’s this weekend as a bit of a celebrity.

The resident of Glencoe, Ont., a town of about 2,200 people near London, was announced Thursday as the winner of the Tim Hortons Duelling Donuts contest.

Jennifer Brown shows off her contest-winning Love Reese's to Pieces donut. Tim Hortons photo

With her tasty creation – Love Reese's to Pieces donut – she beat out 76,500 other contestants, earning $10,000. Her donut – a chocolate donut filled with crème brûlée, covered in chocolate fondant and white dots, and topped with peanuts and peanut butter cups – will be sold at Tim Hortons locations across the country.

It’s been a whirlwind few weeks as she prepares for the new school year., but Ms. Brown is taking it all in stride.

“It’s been really funny,” she says. “That’s my description of it, just funny. And I never would have expected all this to happen but here we are.”

She’s also excited about coming to Queen’s for the fifth and final year of the Queen’s-Trent concurrent education program. She says she’s always wanted to be a teacher.

From her earlier visits, she says she loves the community feel at the university as well as the beauty of Kingston.

As one of the eight finalists, she was allowed to taste her creation and gushes that they’re “delicious.”

“I was nervous because, honestly, the crème brûlée filling seems a little different, an odd choice,” she says. “But I tasted it and it is fantastic, it. It works so well.”

After online voting the finalists were broughttravelled to the company’s head office in Oakville where they had make a pitch to celebrity judges – Jason Priestley, Ben Mulroney, Jann Arden and Anna Olson.

Staff and students prepare for orientation week

Student leaders undergo intensive pre-orientation week training to welcome new students to campus.

Faculty orientation week will have more than 1,000 student leaders on hand to welcome new students to campus.

Next week, Queen'™s will welcome approximately 4,000 new first-year students to campus and introduce them to the place that will become their home away from home.

Once students have moved into residence they begin orientation week activities. At Queen's, incoming first-year students have the option to participate in a two-part orientation week.

More than 1,000 student volunteers undergo intensive training to ensure they are equipped to prepare students for their new living and learning environment and to introduce them to the spirit that makes Queen's unique.

Arig al-Shaibah, Assistant Dean of Student Life and Learning, understands how important this training is for student leaders.

Orientation week by the numbers

More than 1,000 orientation leaders
will be on hand to offer advice and supervision

There are almost 150 SEO student volunteers, residence dons, and Residence Society members involved in university orientation

Queen'™s is welcoming 4,000 new students this fall

Each faculty orientation leader undergoes a minimum of 19 hours of training

There are 8 different faculty orientation weeks at Queen'™s

In 2013, Queen's raised $71,294.70 for Shinerama Canada

"œThe university is excited to welcome a new group of students to campus and give them an educational, inclusive, safe and enjoyable introduction to life on campus and the Kingston community," she says. "To do this, all of our student organizers and leaders receive training to handle a variety of situations in many different areas such as inclusivity, safety, accessibility and mental health."

The first part of the week, university orientation, begins with the Queen's Welcomes U event, the evening of Sunday, Aug. 31, after residence move-in. University orientation days continue on Monday, Sept. 1 and Tuesday, Sept. 2.

University orientation days are co-ordinated by the Student Affairs staff in the Student Experience Office (SEO) who work with Residence Life staff and dons, Residence Society members, and the AMS First Years Not In Residence (FYNIR) student group to ensure students living in residence and off-campus are introduced to their new home and life at Queen'™s and in Kingston.

After university orientation, new students can take part in their faculty-specific orientation days, which run Wednesday, Sept. 3 through Saturday, Sept. 6. Events during faculty orientation days are co-ordinated by the AMS Orientation Roundtable (ORT), comprising student leader representatives from all faculties and schools, as well as incoming exchange, transfer and Bader International Study Centre students.

"œTraining for faculty orientation week leaders is a fundamental part of equipping these students with the knowledge needed to assist in achieving the goals of our orientation week," says Erin Maguire, AMS Orientation Roundtable Co-ordinator. "The AMS looks forward to helping provide incoming students with a solid foundation for a successful academic and social transition to Queen's."

For more information on orientation week at Queen's, visit http://www.queensu.ca/orientation/. More information on the inclusivity and accessibility training provided to all orientation leaders can be found on the Accessibility Hub.

Queen's-led study key to improving the health of young people

By Anne Craig, Communications Officer

A recent report shows Canadian youth smoking rates have dropped in the past 20 years, while rates of obesity and cannabis use remain consistently high. The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) report explores trends in the health of young people over the past two decades.
Study author John Freeman.
 
The HBSC survey has been coordinated every four years since 1989 by the Social Program Evaluation Group (SPEG) of Queen’s University in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada. The study is supported by the World Health Organization and has 43 participating countries primarily from North America and Europe.  Ã¢Â€ÂœThe success we have achieved in reducing adolescents' smoking rates in Canada shows what we can accomplish with a unified cross-sectoral public health approach,” says John Freeman (Education), director of SPEG.
 
Five key findings came out of the HBSC report:
  • Cigarette smoking is the one public health concern that has shown the greatest improvement for Canadian adolescents over the past 20 years. In 1994, Canadian 13-year-old boys and 15-year-old girls had the highest rates of smoking at least once a week internationally. In the 2010 survey, Canadian boys had the lowest smoking rates internationally and rates for Canadian girls dropped to some of the lowest in the countries surveyed. This approach should be adopted in tackling other health issues.
  • Being overweight or obese is an ongoing concern for Canadian students in Grades 6 to 10. In the 2010 survey, Canada ranked second out of 39 HBSC countries in the prevalence of overweight and obese 15-year-old boys and girls. For 13-year-old boys and girls, Canada ranked third and fourth respectively. These numbers have changed little over time.
  • Canadian adolescents have consistently been among the highest levels of cannabis use internationally. In 2010, Canada ranked first for cannabis use in 15-year-old girls and 15-year-old Canadian boys ranked second. Forty percent of Grade 10 Canadian boys and 37 percent of Canadian girls reported having tried cannabis.
  • The prevalence of reported well-being for Canadian young people has been decreasing since the beginning of the survey cycle. The life satisfaction on the national level, as compared to other countries, has been worsening. With a focus on promotion of positive mental health, researchers expect this to improve in the 2014 survey.
  • Youth voices should continue to be heard on research, policy and programming that affect their health.
“The Government of Canada is pleased to have supported Queen’s University in the development of this important report,” said Gregory Taylor, Canada’s Deputy Chief Public Health Officer. “Having accurate information available that helps us understand the changes in the behaviours and attitudes of children and youth is invaluable. This will help to inform policy and program decisions that ultimately promote the health and well-being of Canadian children and youth.”
 
Other Queen’s contributors to the report include Matthew King (SPEG) and Heather Coe (Faculty of Education).

Peter Wolf to head Centre for Teaching and Learning

By Communications Staff,

Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Alan Harrison has announced the appointment of Peter Wolf as Queen’s inaugural associate vice-provost (teaching and learning), effective Oct. 1. In this role, Wolf will direct the Centre for Teaching and Learning and work closely with Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), to support the implementation of the Teaching and Learning Action Plan.

“Our strategic framework reflects our academic plan by emphasizing the importance to Queen’s of the student learning experience, and Peter Wolf will play a crucial role in helping us make the learning experience even better for our students,” says Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). “Peter will become an invaluable asset to Queen’s.”

Peter Wolf, Queen’s inaugural associate vice-provost (teaching and learning).

Peter Wolf was most recently the director, teaching and learning initiatives, at the University of Guelph, having previously served as its inaugural director of open learning and educational support, as well as its director of teaching support services.

“Peter is well known for his enthusiasm, experience and expertise in fostering educator-driven enhancement of teaching and learning in higher education,” says Jill Scott. “His expertise on learning outcomes development and assessment, and his work in the use of learning analytics to better understand the student and educator experience, will be immensely valuable to Queen’s.”

Peter Wolf’s research has principally been in the area of extending education development through course and curriculum interventions. He co-edited an issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education on curriculum development and has published with the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario and in the Journal of Geography in Higher Education and the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education.

“I have already had the pleasure of collaborating with many faculty and staff at Queen's in the past and am looking forward to collaborating with many others in the near future, to further build on Queen's strengths and commitment to the student learning experience," says Wolf.

Wolf has an extensive record of service to the teaching and learning community in higher education. He is, or has been, a member of the learning outcomes steering committee of the Ontario Council on Articulation and Transfer, the Council of Ontario Universities AODA Educators' Accessibility Resource Workgroup, and a director of the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Sports camps supervisor hones his skills

Lucas Matheson has been working with the Queen’s summer sports camps for the past three years and is currently the camps supervisor. (University Communications)

By Andrew Carroll, Gazette editor

Sometimes there's just no denying what you are good at.

For Lucas Matheson (Artsci’14, Ed'15) he has come to accept that, well, he's good with kids. And for that, many parents around Queen's and Kingston are grateful.

Mr. Matheson is the supervisor of the summer sports camp program at Queen’s and has worked his way up over the past three years from counsellor to assistant supervisor to the top spot.

Each day he’s responsible for the goings-on at the camps, as well as the young charges who have arrived to hone basic physical skills but also to just have fun. It’s a job that lines up well with his education as well as his future plans.

Mr. Matheson graduated from the physical and health education program this spring and will be be pursuing a Bachelor of Education here at Queen’s in the fall.

“There was no plan of becoming a teacher before working here. It planted the idea that being around kids is something that I am good at and really have a passion for as a career. Being in the phys-ed program, people always assumed ‘Oh. You’re going to be a gym teacher,’” he says. “I guess out of spite I would always say ‘No, I’m not going to be a phys-ed teacher, just because you said so, that was your first assumption.’ But working at the camp it really made me realize that I am good at this. I have the patience, I have the empathy to be able to relate to the kids, because I was a camper before. It really showed me, hey, I could do this as a career. I really enjoy my day, every day here.”

On a busy day at the Athletics and Recreation Centre, the gym is filled with the sounds of bouncing balls, whistles as well as squeals and laughter. It’s clear that Mr. Matheson is in his element.
His duties range from scheduling and making sure the counsellors are comfortable and doing their jobs correctly, to dealing with parents on any issues, including assuring them that their kids are safe. He also visits the camps and spends some time with the kids.

“It’s nice always saying hello to a little eight-year-old around each corner. That puts a smile on my face every day,” he says.

The summer sports program provides two main camps – divided by age groups: 5-7 and 8-13 – that teach kids the active fundamentals. By introducing them to a range of sports and activities, the kids learn fundamental motor skills as well as lateral movements, spatial awareness and the proper way to catch and throw. In the older group they hone these skills further.

He also oversees the specialty camps – such as football, soccer, volleyball, even fencing – that are run through the varsity sports program. Some of the top competitive athletes at Queen’s are the instructors at the camps while counselors, who are more used to the intricacies of youth camps, act as liaisons with the kids and their parents.

The camps have been running for 25 years and this year have drawn approximately 1,500 kids.

New to the program this year is incorporating the Canadian Sport for Life model that promotes learning the fundamentals at an early age. As a result the sports camps program has adapted to get the kids to learn these skills through fun games. Another area of development, Mr. Matheson points out, is basic social interaction as many of the camp attendees return each summer and meet with friends they haven’t seen over the school year.

While he enjoys the job immensely, responsibilities and all, Mr. Matheson also knows that he is also learning his own fundamentals that will form the foundation of his future studies and, hopefully, career as an elementary school teacher.

“It’s been the perfect job to have considering it actually has an effect towards my career,” he says. “Putting it on a resume as a counsellor and supervisor looks really good trying to apply not only for teachers college and getting into teachers college but now moving forward after that, applying to school boards, showing that I’ve been able to move up all the way from a counsellor to supervisor. Working at a camp looks pretty good and keeps me pretty confident moving forward.”
 

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