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Engineering and Applied Science

Queen’s community takes on the Code Life Ventilator Challenge

More Confronting COVID-19 Stories

Faculty and students at the Human Mobility Research Centre and Ingenuity Labs have joined forces with Kingston Health Science’s Centre (KHSC) health professionals to take on the Code Life Ventilator Challenge, a global call to design a low-cost and easy-to-manufacture ventilator that can be created and deployed anywhere around the world.

The Code Life Ventilator Challenge is a two-week sprint created by the Montreal General Hospital Foundation in collaboration with the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. The challenge calls on teams to design a simple, low-cost, easy-to-manufacture, and easy-to maintain ventilator to help ease massive shortages during the coronavirus crisis.

The Queen’s/KHSC team of 18 includes faculty members and students, as well as health professionals.

“There’s a global shortage of ventilators, and with the outbreak still rapidly progressing, this has become a life and death issue,” says Tim Bryant, Professor Emeritus, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. “Now is the time to come together to respond to this crisis with real solutions. This challenge will save lives.” 

The team is working on a design that uses Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) technology in its design. These machines, which help healthy people with sleep apnea breathe more easily, have the potential to be modified to support or replace breathing for a coronavirus patient.

The team has been able to work on the creation of a prototype thanks to very generous donations of CPAP machines from individuals who responded to a social media request for help. A panel of experts will be judging all designs and posting the top three online for free downloading to anyone who is able to manufacture them.

“Today, more than ever, engineers need to be engaged global citizens,” says Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Dean Kevin Deluzio. “I’m proud of our team and their commitment to finding solutions during these challenging times. It is multidisciplinary teams like this that are required to solve the world’s most pressing challenges.”

In the coming weeks, as the design-build phase of the challenge is completed, the faculty will provide further updates on the team’s progress. Anyone interested in following along is encouraged to “Like” the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science’s Facebook age for further updates.

A team effort to help protect healthcare workers

More Confronting COVID-19 Stories

Queen's students, medical residents, staff and faculty working with community partners to boost personal protection equipment supplies.

Queen's team for PPE
Students and faculty members from the School of Medicine are helping lead a drive to boost supplies of personal protection equipment (PPE) for local healthcare workers. From left: Megan Singh; Zuhaib Mir; Jeremy Babcock; Matthew Snow; and Cesia Quintero (Photo by Saif Elmaghraby)

A team of Queen’s and Kingston community partners are working together to help provide Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) for healthcare professionals working on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The team is a diverse group, bringing together Queen’s faculty members, medical students and medical residents, university students, and staff, as well as partners such as St. Lawrence College, Kingston Frontenac Public Library, and Kingston residents. All are donating their time and 3D printers to manufacture PPE, such as masks and face shields.

The equipment being manufactured is not intended to replace current masks and face shields but would act as a reserve in case supplies were to run out and there were no other options. The prototypes have been approved by KHSC for this purpose.

Hailey Hobbs, an assistant professor at Queen’s and critical care physician at Kingston Health Sciences Centre, initially put out a call on social media and quickly received a number of replies from people who were working on similar projects or ready to provide support.

The first to respond was Jeremy Babcock of the School of Medicine’s Clinical Simulation Centre who quickly got to work printing PPE prototypes from the designs Dr. Hobbs had found. He was then contacted by a group of students from the Queen’s School of Medicine – led by Cesia Quintero, Matt Snow and Megan Singh – who had the same idea and were ready to join the effort.

That was just the start.

“Honestly, I didn't really think that this would take off the way it has. I follow other critical care/intensive care doctors from around the world on Twitter, and with the COVID-19 outbreak I was checking it frequently to keep up to date on what was happening elsewhere in the world,” Dr. Hobbs says. “I found a tweet from Boston about a doc interested in making 3D printed PPE and I thought it was an interesting idea so I tweeted to the Queen’s community asking if there were any 3D printers on campus. I received several answers within 30 minutes and from there things have really snowballed.” 

The medical students and residents have been the feet on the ground helping get the word out about the project and picking up printers loaned out by groups such as the Kingston Frontenac Public Library. They are also leading the work to assemble the PPE. Volunteers to help with the assembly work are welcome.

“The medical school community, as well as the Kingston community at large, have come together in a very beautiful way,” Quintero says. “We started over the weekend with three printers and five people, and it’s quickly snowballed to over 50 printers from various institutions, including Queen’s University, St. Lawrence College, the Limestone District School Board, Kingston Frontenac Public Library, as well as many, many individuals across the province who own their own printers, and who have been donating their time and material. Currently there are more than 70 people involved in organizing, printing, assembling and collecting the products at this point, and these numbers are growing quickly.”

The project gained further momentum after connecting with SparQ Studios, a makerspace supported by Dunin-Deshpande Queen's Innovation Centre (DDQIC), that had five 3D printers and the know-how to manufacture the PPE. SparQ Studios has since become the production hub.

“I am proud with our community. Users of SparQ have volunteered their personal printers and the Alma Mater Society helped me reach more people,” says Connor Crowe, director of SparQ Studios.

There continues to be an open call for more 3D printers that can either be loaned or used at home. 

Overall, much has been accomplished in a short amount of time thanks to the dedication of all those involved.

“The response has been incredible – every day we receive emails from different groups interested in helping or learning from what we are doing to make PPE for their own hospitals,” says Dr. Hobbs. “It’s just been wonderful to know that so many different groups in the community are supportive and willing to help out in any way that they can. It really makes you realize how many great people there are in Kingston and how important it is to help each other in tough times.”

Anyone interested in loaning their 3D printers or printing PPE from home can email Megan Singh. Donations of filament and other supplies are also welcome.

Donations of surplus personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer to KGH and Kingston Community Clinics can be made via Anna Curry at PPEKingston@gmail.com.

For those looking to make a financial donation a GoFundMe page has been set up.

Powering the drive to electric buses

Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Queen’s and member of ePOWER Suzan Eren says innovations in power electronics is key to electrifying 5,000 transit buses. (University Communications)
Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Queen’s and member of ePOWER Suzan Eren says innovations in power electronics is key to electrifying 5,000 transit buses. (University Communications)
 

The Centre for Energy and Power Electronics Research (ePower) at Queen’s University is part of a new cluster of post-secondary institutions receiving funding from the Canadian Urban Transit Research and Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC) to pursue battery electric bus research. CUTRIC is contributing $2.6 million in funding to help achieve the federal government’s ambitious goal of electrifying 5,000 transit buses.

RESEARCH@QUEEN’S
Did you know that the university recently launched a new central website for Queen’s research? From in-depth features to the latest information on the university’s researchers, the site is a destination showcasing the impact of Queen’s research. Discover Research@Queen’s.

The funding, along with an additional $132,500 from federal MITACS industrial research program, will support innovative low-carbon and smart mobility research projects at Queen’s University, OCAD University, University of Windsor, and Ontario Tech University, which form CUTRIC’s National Academic Committee on Zero-Emissions Buses (NAC-ZEB).

This work will address the challenges faced by electric buses and help us realize the goal of making them a transit standard.

Suzan Eren, Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Queen’s and a member of ePOWER, and her team are working to optimize the powertrain used in heavy-duty electric buses to pave the way for practical and efficient next-generation electric buses.

“The key technology of this project is innovations in power electronics to revolutionize the design of a new powertrain architecture,” Dr. Eren says. “This work will address the challenges faced by electric buses and help us realize the goal of making them a transit standard.”

This announcement builds on approximately $16 million in federal funding already awarded to the City of Brampton, TransLink, York Region Transit, and Newmarket-Tay Power Distribution Ltd. through Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) to help launch the Pan-Canadian Electric Bus Demonstration & Integration Trial: Phase I.

Change for tomorrow starts now

Lindsay Jones, Connections Engineering Outreach Coordinator, instructs young students during the Little STEMS Pilot PA Day Program
Lindsay Jones, Connections Engineering Outreach Coordinator, instructs young students during the Little STEMS Pilot PA Day Program. (Supplied photo)

Connections Engineering Outreach of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science recently held a Little STEMS Pilot PA Day Program for girls ages five to 10 on Jan. 31, the first of its kind on a university campus.

The day was focused not only on learning about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), but also encouraging girls to explore options in engineering science. A key message to these girls was ensuring they know there is a need for them and their unique perspectives in these respective fields of study. The day was filled with robotics, coding and confidence building.

The PA Day camp was a resounding success – 28 girls gained knowledge of the different streams of engineering and what they are, and were given an introduction to coding. The participants used the robots known as Dash and Ozobot and programmed their robots to complete a variety of tasks.  

The activity combined different aspects of STEM.

“I’m so proud of this day and all of the girls who attended,” says Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science.” To hear that Grade 2 students Sloane Camirand is interested in math and science, and that Victoria Jeffrey wants to be an astronaut, and Sadie Gould might want to be an engineer one day, is all the more reason to start discussing STEM with girls now, and keep their interest in these fields alive and growing. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science has always been committed to fostering innovation, and with that commitment we must pledge to be inclusive, remove barriers and join the conversation promoting women in STEM.”

United Nations International Day of Women and Girls in Science
“To rise to the challenges of the 21st century, we need to harness our full potential. That requires dismantling gender stereotypes. On this International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let’s pledge to end the gender imbalance in science.”
– UN Secretary-General António Guterres

The Little STEMS Pilot PA Day Program was offered in advance of the United Nations International Day of Women and Girls in Science.  The UN recognizes Feb. 11 as a day for the global community to join together to confront gender biases in science, celebrate those who are leading innovation, and to change the narrative to eliminate the exclusion of women and girls in science. 

“Today I learned to code with colors on an Ozobot and that girls can do anything the boys can. It was a really great day,” says senior kindergarten student Madison Lumb.

Programs like Little STEMS are part of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science’s commitment to removing barriers for women and girls in science, and engaging and inspiring a love of curious thought about the world around us.    

“We do have a gender imbalance in science and I’m proud to work for the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s University, because our faculty and staff see the importance of getting girls interested in science,” says Outreach Coordinator Lindsay Jones. “STEM and the innovation it drives is the future and my job is to make sure girls know they are just as much apart of solving the challenges of the future as their male peers.”

The Little STEMS Pilot PA Day Program would not have been possible without the Connections Engineering Outreach team, the support from the entire Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and funding from Actua Canada, Canada’s largest STEM outreach organization.

 “I’m really great at reading, but days like today remind me I’m also really good at science and math,” says Grade 4 student Lily Gould.

Capturing the Art of Research

Celebrating its fifth year, the Art of Research photo contest is open for submissions until March 12.

  • "Love Under the Microscope" by Dalila Villalobos, MD, Resident (Anatomical Pathology)
    "Love Under the Microscope" by Dalila Villalobos, MD, Resident (Anatomical Pathology)
  • "Santa Fina" by Una D'Elia, Faculty (Art History and Art Conservation)
    "Santa Fina" by Una D'Elia, Faculty (Art History and Art Conservation)
  • "A New Light" by Robert Cichocki, PhD Student (Civil Engineering)
    "A New Light" by Robert Cichocki, PhD Student (Civil Engineering)
  • "Window on a Window to the Universe" by Mark Chen, Faculty (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy)
    "Window on a Window to the Universe" by Mark Chen, Faculty (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy)
  • "Platinum Surface Electrochemistry" by Derek Esau, PhD Student (Chemistry)
    "Platinum Surface Electrochemistry" by Derek Esau, PhD Student (Chemistry)
  • "Keep Cool Boy - The Jets Aloft in West Side Story" by Tim Fort, Faculty (Dan School of Drama and Music)
    "Keep Cool Boy - The Jets Aloft in West Side Story" by Tim Fort, Faculty (Dan School of Drama and Music)
  • "Nano-dendrite Collision" by Hannah Dies, MD/PhD Student (Chemical Engineering)
    "Nano-dendrite Collision" by Hannah Dies, MD/PhD Student (Chemical Engineering)
  • "Exploring Worlds at Home" by James Xie, Undergraduate Student (Engineering Chemistry)
    "Exploring Worlds at Home" by James Xie, Undergraduate Student (Engineering Chemistry)

Researchers … ready your cameras. Returning for its fifth year, the Art of Research photo contest is looking to celebrate and creatively capture the research conducted by the Queen’s community.

RESEARCH@QUEEN’S 
Did you know that the university recently launched a new central website for Queen’s research? From in-depth features to the latest information on the university’s researchers, the site is a destination showcasing the impact of Queen’s research. Discover Research@Queen’s.

Hosted by the Office of the Vice-Principal (University Relations) and open to Queen’s faculty, staff, students, and alumni, the Art of Research provides a unique and accessible method of sharing ground-breaking research happening at the university. It also represents the diversity of Queen’s research, with winners representing multiple disciplines and submissions highlighting research happening at all career stages.

The contest is an opportunity for researchers to mobilize their research and spark curiosity. Visuals can create a more compelling and accessible research narrative. By looking at research from a different perspective, it is possible to find the beauty and art in any project.

Eligibility and Prizes

Any current Queen’s faculty, staff, student, or alumni are eligible to participate. Research depicted in the submissions must have been completed at Queen’s or while the submitter was affiliated with the university. More information about contest rules can be found on the Research@Queen’s website.

In addition to promotion across institutional channels and platforms, prizes of $500 will be awarded for the top submission in each of these categories:

Category Prizes

  • Community Collaborations: Research that partners with or supports communities or groups
  • Invisible Discoveries: Research unseen by the naked eye, hiding in plain sight, or only visible by using alternative methods of perception
  • Out in the Field: Research where it occurs, is documented, or discovered
  • Art in Action Prize: Research that is aesthetically or artistically transformed or research in motion as it happens
  • Best Description: To recognize the most creative and accessible description for an image
  • People’s Choice: Determined by an online vote by members of the Queen’s community

In honour of the fifth anniversary of the Art of Research photo contest, four special prizes of $500 each will be awarded to celebrate the diversity of research happening across the university.

  • The Innovation, Knowledge Mobilization, and Entrepreneurship Prize will be awarded to the submission that best demonstrates research that encompasses a spirit of the applied practices of innovation, entrepreneurship, and knowledge mobilization. (Sponsored by Partnerships and Innovation)
  • The Graduate Studies Prize will be awarded to the image submitted by a Queen’s graduate student or post-doctoral fellow that best embodies the School of Graduate Studies’ motto “Create an Impact.” (Sponsored by the School of Graduate Studies)
  • The Health Sciences Prize will be awarded to the image that best represents the Faculty’s mission of “ask questions, seek answers, advance care, and inspire change.” (Sponsored by the Faculty of Health Sciences)
  • The KGHRI Prize will be awarded to the image that best represents patient-oriented and clinical research. (Sponsored by Kingston General Health Research Institute (KGHRI))

The contest closes on March 12, 2020. The submission form can be found here and winning images from previous competitions are located on the Research@Queen’s website

New internal funding for research

Queen's Vice-Principal (Research) launches Wicked Ideas Competition.

Wicked problems are issues so complex and dependent on so many factors that it is hard to grasp what exactly the problems are or how to tackle them. Wicked ideas are needed to solve these problems, and demand the input of multiple disciplines, multiple perspectives, and relevant practical expertise.

The Vice-Principal (Research) has launched the Wicked Ideas competition as a pilot initiative to fund and support research collaborations that respond to local, national, and global challenges. Aligned with the concept of the Government of Canada’s New Frontiers in Research Fund – Exploration program, the competition “seeks to inspire projects that bring disciplines together beyond traditional disciplinary or common interdisciplinary approaches by research teams with the capacity to explore something new, which might fail but has the potential for significant impact.” Along with both disciplinary and interdisciplinary funding streams, the competition offers a “global challenge” stream, featuring climate change as a global challenge area.  Teams of researchers are invited to submit notices of intent by Feb. 3, 2020.

“This funding is designed to remove some of the financial barriers to high-risk, high-reward research, allowing scholars to push the boundaries of knowledge into uncharted territory,” says Dr. Kent Novakowski, Acting Vice-Principal (Research). “I greatly look forward to hearing about some of the paradigm-shifting ideas that come out of this new exploratory opportunity.”

Up to 15 teams will be awarded $75,000 each in the first phase of the competition in spring 2020. The 15 teams then will be eligible to compete for one of an additional five awards of up to $150,000 in the 2021 Wicked Ideas competition. The competition is open to all Queen's faculty across all disciplines. Co-investigators and team members also must be Queen's faculty members.

This is just one of several internal funding programs that have been launched by the Vice-Principal (Research) recently.  Other programs include the Queen’s Research Opportunities Fund (QROF) Post-doctoral Fund, as well as the Catalyst Fund – designed to enhance areas of research excellence by giving scholars an opportunity to accelerate their research programs.

A revised Prizes for Excellence in Research competition, which has recognized scholarly achievement at Queen’s since 1980, is set to launch soon.

More information about all of these programs, including terms of reference, is available on the Vice-Principal (Research) website.

Queen's commemorates 30th anniversary of l’École Polytechnique massacre

Permanent memorial announced as university marks National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

  • Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty lighting candles as the ceremony begins.
    Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty lighting candles as the ceremony begins.
  • The Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Kevin Deluzio, delivering opening remarks.
    The Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Kevin Deluzio, delivering opening remarks.
  • Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty commemorating each of those killed in the attack.
    Queen's Engineering and Applied Science students, staff, and faculty commemorating each of those killed in the attack.
  • Civil engineering student Haley Adams speaking about her design for a permanent Dec. 6 memorial that will be installed on campus in 2020.
    Civil engineering student Haley Adams speaking about her design for a permanent Dec. 6 memorial that will be installed on campus in 2020.
  • Jean Hutchinson, Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, speaking about the importance of equity and inclusion in engineering.
    Jean Hutchinson, Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, speaking about the importance of equity and inclusion in engineering.

The Queen’s community marked the 30th anniversary of the killing of 14 women at Montreal’s l’École Polytechnique on Friday.

Queen’s alumna included in online tribute

To commemorate the Dec. 6 tragedy and to promote the work of female engineers across Canada, Engineering Deans Canada invited each of the Canadian engineering schools that offered an accredited engineering program in 1989 to put forward the story of an engineering alumna who graduated within three years of the massacre (1986-1992), and whose career exemplifies the value that women bring to the engineering profession and to society. Queen’s is represented by Andrea Baptiste (Sc’88), an accomplished senior executive and entrepreneur who currently leads the Startup Ecosystem for Canada at Amazon. Her profile, and the other successful nominees, can be viewed at 30yearslater.ca.

During the ceremony, organized and hosted by the Engineering Society of Queen’s University, engineering students, staff, and faculty held roses, lit candles, and read brief statements about each victim and their accomplishments.

The event, held in the lobby of the Integrated Learning Centre, was attended by dozens of Queen’s community members, including students, faculty, staff, and administration members.

Twelve female engineering students, a nurse, and a faculty member were killed in the 1989 massacre. Three years after the attack, Dec. 6 was declared the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

Following the event, Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, announced the design that has been selected for a permanent Dec. 6 memorial in the Integrated Learning Centre. Created by Haley Adams, a third-year civil engineering student, the piece will be installed in 2020.

A call for designs, open to all members of the Queen’s community, was issued earlier this year by Dean Deluzio and the Engineering Society’s Memorial Design Committee.

Research @ Queen’s: Engineering environmental solutions

Leachate, liners, landfills, and learning – how Queen’s researcher Kerry Rowe is working with, instead of against, nature to solve an environmental problem.

Kerry Rowe, Canada Research Chair in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering and professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, researches landfill management and is developing techniques that work with nature rather than fighting nature. (Photo by Bernard Clark / University Communications)

“Part of what we’ve been doing is developing techniques [for landfills] that work with nature rather than fighting nature, and trying to make nature work for us instead of against us.” Kerry Rowe

RESEARCH @ QUEEN’S
Did you know that the university recently launched a new central website for Queen’s research? From in-depth features to the latest information on the university’s researchers, the site is a destination showcasing the impact of Queen’s research. Discover Research at Queen’s.

Human beings have undoubtedly been throwing things away for as long as we have had things to throw. These ancient middens – the predecessors of our modern landfills – provide a treasure trove of artefacts for archaeologists, who sift through discarded items for clues to how people once lived.

Today’s dumpsites may well offer up similar insights to future investigators, but they are already revealing a great deal about how our environmental sensibilities have evolved over the last 60 or 70 years.

Continue the story on the Research at Queen’s website.

Queen’s names its next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic)

Mark F. Green will assume the role in March 2020.

Mark F. Green
Mark F. Green will begin his five-year term as Provost and Vice-Principal on March 1, 2020.

Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane announced Mark F. Green (Sc’87) will serve as Queen’s University's next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). Dr. Green is a skilled and respected administrator, accomplished researcher, admired teacher, and champion of diversity and inclusivity who currently holds the position of Vice Dean (Graduate Studies and Recruitment) at the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s. He will begin his five-year term as Provost on March 1, 2020, succeeding Interim Provost Tom Harris.

“At a time when the university is embarking on a new vision, Dr. Green’s widely known and acknowledged ability to engage and lead others through consensus will be invaluable,” says Principal Deane. “He is a globally recognized scholar, an experienced administrator, and an admired teacher. His unique perspective and diversity of experience will contribute greatly to our institution’s aspirations and vision for the future.”

Dr. Green has a long history at Queen’s, having completed his undergraduate work here in 1987, and returning to undertake a post-doctoral fellowship after earning his PhD at the University of Cambridge. He was granted full professorship at Queen’s in 2001, and served as Acting Associate Academic Dean (2013),  Acting Head (2000, 2014-15) and Associate Head (2009-13, 2015-18) in the Department of Civil Engineering.

Dr. Green is an international research scholar in structural engineering whose award-winning work focuses on enabling structures, such as bridges, to withstand extreme conditions, and more recently on sustainable engineering technologies. He also champions multidisciplinary approaches to academic endeavours and has been cross-appointed to both the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Faculty of Education.

“It is a great privilege to accept this opportunity here at Queen’s, a place that has served as the backdrop for much of my educational and professional life,” says Dr. Green.  “Queen’s is an exceptional institution with an incredible community of students, staff, faculty, and alumni, and I look forward to working together with them in my new role as Provost.”

Dr. Green is a member of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte and has an active interest in encouraging and supporting diversity and inclusivity throughout the university. He was the co-chair of the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force, as well as an advisor to the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusion (PICRDI). He is also an advisor to the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science on the development of an Aboriginal Access to Engineering Initiative, previously served as Co-Chair of the Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University and as Chair of the First Nations Technical Institute.

Dr. Harris was appointed Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) in 2018. He will retire from the position when Dr. Green assumes the role in March 2020.

“I want to express my utmost gratitude to Provost Harris for his dedication to the interim appointment and for his many years of service to Queen’s,” says Principal Deane. “Provost Harris brought a wealth of experience to the role and has been invaluable to me in this time of transition."
 

Members of the advisory selection committee:

The search for Queen’s University’s next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) was conducted by an advisory selection committee chaired by Daniel Woolf and Patrick Deane. The committee included representation from across the administration, faculty, and student body. Membership included:

  • Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor (Chair)
  • Patrick Deane, Principal and Vice-Chancellor Designate (Chair)
  • Jeremy Ambraska, SGPS President
  • Liying Cheng, Professor, Faculty of Education
  • Cathy Crudden, Professor, Chemistry
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Janice Hill, Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation)
  • Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration)
  • Ram Murty, Professor, Mathematics
  • Auston Pierce, AMS President
  • Fahim Quadir, Dean, School of Graduate Studies
  • Stephanie Simpson, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion)
  • Christine Sypnowich, Professor, Philosophy
  • Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research)

Highlighting interdisciplinary graduate research

[Keynote Speaker, Dr. Matt Hipsey presenting to Beaty Water Research Centre students and faculty]
[Keynote Speaker, Dr. Matt Hipsey of University of Western Australia, presents to Beaty Water Research Centre students and faculty. (Supplied photo)

The Beaty Water Research Centre recently hosted its second annual Research Symposium which provided students the opportunity to highlight their interdisciplinary graduate research and to build research collaborations.

This year’s event was attended by more than 100 participants and showcased 27 student research posters and four oral student research presentations from a variety of disciplines. The keynote speaker was Matt Hipsey, a professor from the University of Western Australia, who provided an international perspective to water research and innovation.

The Beaty Water Research Centre is an interdisciplinary research, education and outreach centre focused on water quality, access, sustainability, resources and governance. Researchers include faculty members from a variety of disciplines in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of Arts and Science, and Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s and the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC).

Creating LEADERS

Earlier in the year, the centre hosted the first LEaders in wAter anD watERshed Sustainability (LEADERS) Symposium. The LEADERS program is led by Stephen Brown, professor in the departments of Chemistry and Environmental Studies at Queen’s. The program is funded – $1.65 million over six years – through the NSERC Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) and was launched in 2018.

The first cohort of highly-qualified personnel to the program was recruited earlier this year through a competitive application process and in July these students participated in the first LEADERS Research Symposium and training workshop. This two-day event not only allowed students to present their research, it also provided them with the opportunity to receive feedback from leading researchers in disciplines such as engineering, environmental studies, chemistry, biology, policy studies, business, and public health, and provided a field method workshop at the Kennedy Station, a 200-acre scientific station located on the Salmon River Watershed near Tamworth.

[Beaty Water Research Centre symposium award winners]
A number of awards were handed out during the research symposium. Poster winners include Alexandria Cushing, first place  (third from left); Nada Sadeq, second place (not pictured); and Eden Hataley (left) and Katrina Paudyn, third place (second from left). Oral presentation winner David Patch is at right. (Supplied photo)

“The LEADERS symposium broadened my understanding of how my research project has broader implications across disciplines. The field methods workshop provided me with greater understanding of some of the challenges with field research which will help not only with my research, but also in my career post graduation,” says Madeleine Kelly a Master’s of Environmental Studies student in Dr. Brown’s research group at Queen’s.

The centre’s research symposiums and workshops allow students to broaden their understanding of their research through facilitated interdisciplinary networking sessions. 

“The Beaty Water Research Centre encourages collaborative interdisciplinary research, education and outreach, and the research symposium and the LEADERS program truly embodies our vision,” says Beaty Director Pascale Champagne, Canada Research Chair in Bioresource Engineering.

This year’s top poster awards went to Alexandria Cushing (first), Nada Sadeq (second), and Katrina Paudyn and Eden Hataley (third). The top oral presentation award went to David Patch.

Symposium sponsors included Kingston Economic Development Corporation, SHOWA, and Queen’s School of Graduate Studies. 

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