Faculty of Arts & Science
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Academic Appeals

The Academic Regulations for the Faculty of Arts and Science are designed to ensure that academic standards are upheld and that all students are treated fairly and equitably. The Faculty does, however, understand that there are occasions in which extenuating circumstances, that is circumstances beyond a student's control, adversely affect a student's performance at Queen's University. The appeal process is available to reconsider the suitability of sanctions or penalties imposed upon a student in light of information brought forward by the student concerning such extenuating circumstances. Appeals within the Faculty of Arts and Science are governed by the sections on Academic Regulations and Academic appeals in the Calendar.

Extenuating Circumstances:

In general, with the exception of appeals related to final examinations, final grades, or non-academic discipline where other criteria will apply, appeals are only granted where there are significantly extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, which would merit the waiving of a particular Faculty regulation or decision. Extenuating circumstances normally involve a significant physical or psychological event that is beyond a student’s control and debilitating to his or her academic performance. These kinds of extraordinary situations should be supported by official documentation from an appropriate professional.

Unresolved Circumstances:

The appeals process does not compensate for extenuating circumstances that the student is unable to resolve, or for which the student is unwilling to actively seek accommodation. In addition, the appeals process does not compensate for extenuating circumstances that are actively being accommodated, for example where a student’s permanent disabilities are being accommodated through the university’s Disability Services Office. Multiple appeals citing the same extenuating circumstances will be reviewed very closely. This review may include, with the permission of the student, consultation with the appropriate professionals involved to obtain more detailed information. In order for such an appeal to succeed, there must be convincing evidence that the circumstances that affected the student’s academic performance will be resolved within a reasonable timeline, or will be appropriately managed on an ongoing basis.

Student Assistance:

Students are encouraged to contact Harry Smith, Coordinator of Dispute Resolution Mechanisms, who is available along with other Dispute Resolution advisors for impartial advice, mediation, and assistance in submitting an appeal. Phone: (613) 533-6495; e-mail: drm@queensu.ca.

General Information

Appeals within Arts and Science provide accommodation for extenuating circumstances or allow for review of academic decisions. The processes governing appeals are set out in the sections on Academic Regulations and Academic Appeals in the calendar and in these web pages. Students are responsible for informing themselves of these processes and the information necessary to submit a complete appeal.

Submit an Appeal here

What is Appealable?

Can I appeal an Academic Probation ruling?
No.  This ruling is based strictly on a student’s academic performance therefore, it is not appealable.  However, you may appeal to drop the courses or request CR or AG grades that in turn led to the “Academic Probation” ruling.  If the appeal is granted, the student’s record will be reviewed again and the “Academic Probation” ruling will be removed if it no longer applies.

Can I appeal a “Not eligible to Proceed” ruling?
No.  This ruling is based strictly on a student’s academic performance therefore, it is not appealable.  However, you may appeal to drop the courses or request CR or AG grades that in turn led to the “NEP” ruling.  If the appeal is granted, the student’s record will be reviewed again and the “NEP” ruling will be removed if it no longer applies.

Can I make an appeal after I graduated?
No appeal may be submitted by a student after 21 days following graduation.

Can I appeal for a tuition refund?
The Faculty of Arts and Science can accept appeals based on academic matters only.  Any appeals of a financial nature must be made to the Office of the University Registrar.

How do I appeal a Finding of a Departure from Academic Integrity?
The Academic Regulations for the Faculty of Arts and Science are designed to ensure that academic standards are upheld and that all students are treated fairly and equitably. You may appeal the finding of departure from academic integrity and/or the sanction imposed as a result of an instructor's finding to the Associate Dean (Studies). The appeal process is available to reconsider the suitability of sanctions or penalties imposed upon a student in light of new information brought forward by the student concerning such extenuating circumstances.

General Appeal Questions

Do I have to appeal?  Are there any other options?
If you wish to pursue any of these options, yes you must submit an appeal for your request to be considered.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

Do I have to submit a formal appeal?  Can I just talk to someone instead?
If you wish to pursue any of these options, yes you must submit an appeal for your request to be considered.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

If I appeal will I have to speak with the Associate Dean (Studies)?
You will not be required to meet with anyone concerning your appeal unless further clarification is required. 

Who will see my appeal?
Your appeal will be reviewed by the Appeals Coordinator to ensure that it is complete and contains all of the information the Associate Dean (Studies) requires to make a decision.  Your appeal will then be reviewed by the Associate Dean (Studies).  A copy of the appeal will remain in your student file in the Faculty Office.  No information in your student file can be released to a third party, including other offices on campus without your consent. 

What are my appeal rights as a student?
See the Senate Policy on Student Appeals, Rights and Discipline (SARD): http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/policies/senateandtrustees/SARDPolicy.pdf  For more information, contact the Dispute Resolution Mechanisms Coordinator at 153 Richardson Hall, 613-533-6495, drm@queensu.ca

Is my appeal confidential?
Any information submitted to the Faculty Office is confidential and will not be shared or released to any third party, including other offices on campus without your consent.

I’m not sure if I should appeal or not.  Who can I ask for advice?
You may contact the Faculty Office to schedule an appointment with an Academic Counsellor. 

I’m not sure I have strong enough grounds for appealing.  Who can I ask for help?
You should contact the Faculty Office to schedule an appointment with an Academic Counsellor.  

What is considered to be an extenuating circumstance?
An extenuating circumstance is defined as a significant physical or psychological event that is beyond a student’s control and debilitating to his or her academic performance.

I’m not sure what to appeal.  Who can I ask for help?
You should contact the Faculty Office to schedule an appointment with an Academic Counsellor.

I’m a Commerce /Applied Science/Nursing student and I want to appeal an elective course in Arts and Science.  Which faculty should I appeal through?
You should appeal through your home Faculty.  Therefore, if you are Commerce /Applied Science/Nursing student, you must appeal through the School of Business /Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science/School of Nursing, even if it is an Arts and Science course you are appealing.

I’m an Arts and Science student and I want to appeal a Commerce/Nursing/Applied Science course.  Which faculty should I appeal through?
You should appeal through your home Faculty.  Therefore, if you are an Arts and Science student, you must appeal through the Faculty of Arts and Science, even if it is a Commerce course you are appealing.

Can I cancel an appeal once I have submitted it?
Yes, you may withdraw an appeal if a decision has not yet been made.

Can I cancel or reverse an appeal after a decision is made?
No.  Once an appeal decision is made, the appeal cannot be retracted.  

Is there a deadline to submit an appeal?
Yes.  Appeals must be received within 21 days after a final grade has been posted or an academic ruling has been made.   

I don’t have a NetID – how can I submit my appeal?
You can obtain a NetID at: http://www.queensu.ca/its/netid/activation.html   If you require further assistance, please contact the Faculty Office.

Can I appeal the same time period twice? 
No, students are not able to revisit the same time period in submitting subsequent appeals.  For example, if a student has appealed to drop one or more courses without academic penalty in the Fall term, he or she cannot make a subsequent different appeal in relation to that same time period.

Can any exceptions be made to the drop deadlines?
No, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

I just missed the drop deadline by one day.  Do I still have to appeal?
Yes, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

Can I ask to drop more than one course in my appeal?
Yes.  There is no limit on how many courses you can appeal.  Once you have entered your first course, click on “add another course” and a new entry will appear.

Do I have to pay a separate appeal fee for each course I am appealing?
No.  There is one flat fee of $50.00 to submit an appeal and there is no limit on the number of requests you can make in one appeal.

Can I make more than one request in my appeal?
Yes.  You may ask for a number of different appeal options depending on your circumstances.  For example, a student may request to waive a requirement to withdraw and request to drop courses late in one appeal.  A student may also request Aegrotat standing in a course, Credit standing in a course and a late drop in another course all taken in the same term.

Do I have to tell my instructor I am appealing his or her course?
Not necessarily.  If you are appealing to drop a course past the academic deadline, we will not contact your instructor.  If you are appealing to receive Credit or Aegrotat standing in a course, we will contact your instructors in those courses to confirm eligibility for those grades notations and to seek general feedback.  No details of your appeal are shared with your instructors. 

Will you contact my instructor if I appeal his or her course?
In the case of an appeal for Credit or Aegrotat standing the Faculty Office will contact the course instructor to confirm eligibility for the CR or AG grade and request general feedback.  This information supplied by the instructor is included with the appeal and will be taken into consideration along with the other information provided.  No other information related to the appeal is released to the instructor unless the student has granted permission to release it.

In the case of a re-read request, the work to be re-read is sent to the Department Head, together with the student’s description of their specific concerns with the grading.  The Department Head will forward this material on to the original course instructor, and to a second, unbiased faculty member with expertise in the subject matter to review the work.  Upon receipt of the reviewers’ reports, the Department Head will assess the reports and transmit his/her recommendation to the Associate Dean (Studies). 

My instructor does not support my appeal.  What should I do?
You may proceed with an appeal even if your instructor does not support it.  The Associate Dean (Studies) will take all information presented in the appeal into consideration when making a decision. 

Limitations on Appeals

The appeals process does not compensate for extenuating circumstances that a student is unable to resolve, or for which the student is unwilling to actually seek accommodation.

  1. Only students registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science are eligible to submit an appeal.
  2. Students are not able to revisit the same time period in submitting subsequent appeals. For example if a student has appealed to drop a course(s) without academic penalty in the Fall Term, he or she is not able to make a second appeal for the same time period.
  3. No appeal may be made 21 days after a student has graduated. Students may appeal (in writing) that an exception to this timeline be granted; however, such requests will only be granted in cases where extenuating circumstance beyond the student’s control rendered the student unable to submit an appeal within the specified timeline. A student must be able to show that the extenuating circumstances were ongoing and must also be able to demonstrate that these circumstances prevented the student from acting between the time the original decision was received and the time at which the appeal was eventually initiated. Appeals of this type should include a presentation of the specific reasons for a delay and supporting documentation is essential.
  4. In general, with the exception of appeals related to final examinations, final grades, or non-academic discipline where other criteria will apply, appeals are only granted where there are significantly extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, which would merit the waiving of a particular Faculty regulation or decision. Extenuating circumstances normally involve a significant physical or psychological event that is beyond a student’s control and debilitating to his or her academic performance. These kinds of extraordinary situations should be supported by official documentation from an appropriate professional.

NOTE: Matters that can be appealed are noted in the Faculty of Arts and Science regulations. Please note that, in accordance with the Queen's Senate Policy on Student Appeals, Rights and Discipline, admission decisions cannot be appealed.

Levels of Appeal in the Faculty of Arts and Science

There are three levels of appeal in the Faculty of Arts and Science. The first two levels are located within the faculty of Arts and Science and deliver a verdict on the academic issues related to the case. The third and final level is an appeal to the University Student Appeal Board is an appeal on matters of process only.

  1. Appeal to the Office of the Associate Dean (Studies)
    • appeals must be in writing accompanied by a signed Associate Dean (Studies) appeal form
    • they must be received in the Faculty Office by the stated deadline (within 21 calendar days of initial decision being appealed for most appeals)
    • Supporting documentation verifying the extenuating circumstances must be provided with your letter of appeal.
  2. Appeal to the Board of Studies
    • Appeals must be in writing accompanied by a signed Board of Studies appeal form
    • Appeals must be received in the Faculty Office by the stated deadlines (within 21 calendar days after the decision of the Associate Dean (Studies))
    • All materials in the previous appeal are forwarded to the Board
    • Students may only add an additional letter to the Board addressing the decision of the Office of Associate Dean (Studies).
  3. Appeal to the University Student Appeal Board
    • Appeals to the University Student Appeal Board relate only to the process by which the previous decisions were rendered and does not deal with the merits of the appeal itself.
    • Contact Harry Smith, Coordinator of Dispute Resolution Mechanisms (phone: (613) 533-6495; email: drm@post.queensu.ca).

Appeal Letters

How long does my appeal letter have to be?
Not long – one page is usually sufficient.  Your letter must state what exactly you are requesting.  It must also clearly explain the timeline of your extenuating circumstances, the severity of your extenuating circumstances and the impact that your extenuating circumstances have had on the courses you are appealing.  If you are registered in several courses over a term but you are only appealing one of those courses, you should include an explanation as to why only the course being appealed has been affected by your circumstances and not the other courses. You are not required to outline the specific details of the particular condition or matter affecting you.

Do I have to disclose the details of my extenuating circumstances?
No. You are not required to outline the specific details of the particular condition or matter affecting you but you do need to provide enough information for the Associate Dean (Studies) to make an informed decision. This means, we do ask that you indicate the specific ways in which your extenuating circumstances have affected your studies and provide a clear timeline indicating the start, duration and present state of your extenuating circumstances. It is also important to explain whether or not the circumstances have either improved, been resolved or how you are managing them so that they will not have a significant and detrimental effect on your future academic performance.

What if I am not comfortable writing down my circumstances? Can I just come in and talk to someone?
No. We do require all appeals to follow the standard appeals process. You can be assured however, that you are not required to outline the specific details of the particular condition or matter affecting you. You simply need to provide enough information for the Associate Dean (Studies) to make an informed decision. This means, we do ask that you indicate the specific ways in which your extenuating circumstances have affected your studies and provide a clear timeline indicating the start, duration and present state of your extenuating circumstances. It is also important to explain whether or not the circumstances have either improved, been resolved or how you are managing them so that they will not have a significant and detrimental effect on your future academic performance. Your documentation only needs to confirm this information as well.

Can I submit more information or documentation for my appeal after it has been submitted?
Yes. You can add more information and/or documentation to an existing appeal by accessing the appeals application on-line and clicking “Submit amendment to previous appeal”. You will choose the appeal in progress and follow the instructions.

Tips for Writing a Good Appeal Letter

Word Limit: Letters should be concise and should not exceed 500-800 words (or a page to a page and a half) typed and single spaced.

Address: Address your letter to the Associate Dean (Studies)

Structure: The appeal letter should be structured in three parts:

The Request: State clearly what your appeal is about. (For instance: "I am appealing the Faculty's decision that I must withdraw from Queen's for a minimum of three years." Or "I am appealing to drop POLS 264* (Fall, 2005)...)".

Explanation of Extenuating Circumstances: In the second section of the appeal, provide a concise explanation of the extenuating circumstances--those personal events beyond your control--which have directly affected your academic performance. "Extenuating circumstances, beyond your control" that students typically describe include a physical illness, a psychological challenge, domestic or family problems, or an unusual academic event. Note that the actual detailed personal circumstances are not as important as the effects of these events on your academic performance.
Therefore, you should make a direct connection between the extenuating circumstances as outlined in the supporting documents and their effect on your academic performance. Please discuss when the particular events occurred, how long you were affected, and what work in your courses was affected. You might also outline what steps you took to deal with the extenuating circumstances during or after their occurrence (for example, consultation with a health-care professional or personal counselor).

Future plan: An appeal should normally include a plan for achieving academic success should your appeal be granted. In the case of a temporary extenuating circumstance, such as a physical illness, the plan for coping with the extenuating circumstance is often straightforward. For example, you are appealing to drop a course late and you propose to retake the course the following year or over the spring session.
However, in the case of more severe or ongoing extenuating circumstances, you should indicate how you will make personal adjustments to succeed in your future studies. Some of your plans might address academics (e.g., such as taking a lighter course load, changing programs etc) whereas others might pertain more directly to your extenuating circumstance such as maintaining regular meetings with a medical professional or personal counselor. Your appeal letter should specify how your future plans will support your academic goals. You are encouraged to consult with an academic or personal advisor.

Appeal Documentation

Official documentation does not need to outline the specifics of the particular condition or matter affecting the student, but should clearly indicate ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student’s performance, and should verify that these effects were substantial enough to cause the academic problem. Information on the start, duration and present state of the extenuating condition is critical to helping the instructor, Associate Dean (Studies) or Board of Studies to make an informed decision. Further, a clear statement on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed so that they will not have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance is also essential.

Do I have to submit supporting documentation?
Yes, supporting documentation is required for all appeals with the exception of re-reads. Otherwise, you may consult with an academic counsellor for advice on how to proceed with your appeal request.

What kind of documentation do I need to provide?
A note or letter from a healthcare professional is always preferred but if you have not sought professional help you may supply a letter from another individual such as a parent or family member.  Please ensure that the author of the note signs it and supplies contact information so we can have it verified.  Some other types of documentation you may submit: letters from funeral homes, death certificates, obituary notices, letters from lawyers, legal documents, court notices, bank statements, travel tickets, letter from employer, government documentation.  Documentation that is generally not considered to be adequate: photographs of medical conditions, medical reports, prescriptions, high school transcripts, resumes, notes or letters from non-certified healthcare providers.  See: http://www.queensu.ca/hcds/ds/students/documentation.html. Also see the Appeal Documentation Chart below.

I haven’t seen a doctor or counsellor so I don’t have any supporting documentation.  What should I do?
A note or letter from a healthcare professional is always preferred but if you have not sought professional help you may supply a letter from another individual such as a parent or family member.  Please ensure that the author of the note signs it and supplies contact information so we can have it verified. You may also fill out a Self-Declaration of Illness Form. Otherwise, you may consult with an academic counsellor for advice on how to proceed with your appeal request.

Can my parents write a letter for my documentation?
A note or letter from a healthcare professional is always preferred but if you have not sought professional help you may supply a letter from another individual such as a parent or family member.  Please ensure that the author of the note signs it and supplies contact information so we can have it verified.

Official Supporting Documentation for Appeals

Official documentation does not need to outline the specifics of the particular condition or matter affecting the student, but should indicate ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student's individual performance. Information on the start date, duration and present state of the circumstance aids the instructor, the Associate Dean (Studies) or the Board of Studies in making an informed decision concerning any matter under review. Further, comment on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed to the point that they will not have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance is also useful to appeal decision makers.

Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note [PDF] if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services. Please provide your off-campus physician with these guidelines [PDF]

Appeal Documentation Chart

Appeal Type
Letter from Professional
Instructor Support
Undergraduate
Chair Support
Other*
Late Course Add
yes, in many casesyesyesoptional
Late Course Drop
yesnonooptional
AG Requestyesyesnooptional
CR Requestyesyesnooptional
IN Extension Requestyesyesnooptional
Re-Readnononooptional
Request for LOP in 3rd or 4th yearyesnoyesoptional
Waive RTW1yesnono optional
Waive RTW3yesnono optional
Return after RTW3 Lapsedoptionalnono** optional
Waive 21-day Appeal Deadlineyesnono optional

*Other documentation may be in the form of email correspondence, computer documents, SOLUS activity reports, travel tickets, or anything to confirm facts and timelines presented in the appeal letter.

**If you are returning to studies after a Requirement to Withdraw for 3 years and wish to resume studies in the the academic Plan in which you were previously registered, the Faculty Office will seek approval from the Undergraduate Chair for entrance back into that Plan upon receiving your Return to Studies Form.

Preparing an Academic Plan

An academic plan will help:

  • focus your goals
  • motivate you
  • you to be successful

Why an Academic Plan?

An academic plan is a carefully crafted set of goals that comprises three key elements:

  • the focus of your studies
  • your expectation or intentions with respect to work load
  • your strategies for success.

Building an academic plan is an essential step in preparing for a successful return to studies after an unsuccessful academic year. If you are appealing to have an academic regulation waived, you must provide compelling evidence to the Associate Dean (Studies) that you are now in a position to achieve good academic results. If you are returning to studies after being placed on academic probation or required to withdraw, you will want to avoid the barriers to academic success that you faced previously.

Self reflection is an excellent starting point, but you will also need to supplement this with the "reality check" afforded through consultation with others. You are encouraged to get whatever advice is relevant:

  • speak with professionals;
  • consult with academic support services and resources on campus;
  • gain input from your family or friends;
  • read about various solutions.

Developing an academic plan will require you to make a significant effort. Remember, however, that the "true" payoff for you will be a successful return to studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

The Components of the Plan

Course of Study

The academic plan should describe your proposed degree program, area of concentration and courses in which you intend to register in the upcoming academic session. It may be appropriate to refer to types of courses or options, rather than specifics, when talking about future years of study. Access to undergraduate programs in Arts and Science is competitive, subject to both minimum academic performance criteria and enrolment pressures. Obtain written confirmation from the Undergraduate Chair or Assistant that you are eligible for the degree program, concentration, and courses you are including in your academic plan.

Full time versus Part time status

Consider your ability to be a full time student who would normally attend 15 to 20 hours per week of classes and spend another 20 or more hours studying outside of class time. A lighter course load may be more appropriate given your individual circumstances. Take into account any incomplete coursework from previous academic sessions that you have permission to submit late when considering the number of courses you will take. Also consider whether you need to carry a part-time job while you are going to school. Under no circumstances should a student returning after a difficult year plan to carry more than a normal load of 30.0 course units.

Strategies for Success

Students too often fall into the false belief that if they just try harder they will succeed. Identify what problem(s) stood in the way of your academic success in the past and explain how you expect to avoid or mitigate the problem(s) in the future. Sometimes these influences are obvious; other times its difficult to identify the reasons behind low grades so follow up with an academic advisor or other professionals to ensure that you are addressing the relevant performance issues. Document the resources you have marshaled in support of your proposed return to studies.

Key Questions to Guide You in Preparing Your Academic Plan

1. Academic Preparation

Did you have difficulty with the course content?

If yes, then you should consider appropriate academic remedies such as:

  • retaking courses, especially prerequisite courses;
  • planning regular consultations with the course professor and/or Teaching Assistants
  • seeking assistance from a campus resource like the Writing Centre or Learning Strategies (Stauffer Library);
  • joining a study group;
  • connecting with a tutor or peer mentor;

Do you think your choice of academic programs is the problem?

If yes, you should consider:

  • switching to a program more suited to your academic background and strengths.
  • seeking advice from the Undergraduate Office in the relevant departments, and /or the Arts and Science Faculty Office (F200 Mackintosh-Corry Hall or 613-533-2470) on how to develop the level of academic preparedness needed.
  • gaining insight into your skills, abilities and strengths by working with a Learning Strategist from the Learning Strategies office or a counsellor from Health, Counselling and Disability Services.

Have you acquired the learning strategies that will allow you to be an effective student, for example, time management, study skills, exam mastery techniques, writing competency, presentation skills, etc.?

If not, you should:

  • consult with the Learning Commons, located in the Stauffer Library for advice or access to a peer mentor or arrange for a Writing Centre tutorial.
  • take an on-campus workshop, for example, "Presentation Skills" or "Exam Study Tips" through Learning Strategies.
  • access resources to support effective learning from outside the University.

2. Motivation

Was the material sufficiently interesting, so that working on your academic subjects was generally rewarding? Did you make sufficient effort at your academics relative to your nonacademic activities? Or did you tend to miss classes, avoid your readings and fail to complete the coursework?

If motivation is your problem, you might:

  • consult with a career counselor
  • switch to another academic program that you believe might be more appealing
  • consider whether another educational institution might be more appropriate
  • consider if the very real problem of procrastination or perfectionism is an issue and meet with a Learning Strategies advisor to address these motivation barriers.
  • tutors at the Writing Centre may be able to help
  • take a break from post-secondary study
  • be evaluated by a physician or counsellor for physical or mental health related issues

3. Personal and Financial Resources

Do you have the physical and mental health needed to be a successful student? Do you have the life skills needed to cope with everyday interpersonal and practical demands?

If lack of personal resources is your problem, seek assistance by contacting:

Do you have the financial resources you need to support yourself at university? Do your hours at work interfere with your ability to focus and complete your academic work?

If money is your key problem, you should obtain information on:

  • budget planning from the Student Awards Office of the University Registrar or a financial advisor
  • bursaries and other sources of financial assistance from the Student Awards Office of the University Registrar
  • reducing your academic load if you must supplement your finances with a part-time job.

4. Situational Demands

Were you subject to extraordinary situational demands that prevented you from succeeding?

If life events have placed you in an exceptional situation, such as the death of someone close, accident, legal battle, family emergencies, etc., you should:

  • Be realistic about any long term effects you may experience from these extenuating circumstances.
  • Be able to explain convincingly how you have/intend to overcome any situational demands that prevented you from succeeding and describe the resources you have accessed. This is an essential component of any appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) to have a regulation to be waived.

Evaluating the Success of the Academic Plan

You should use your academic plan both as a guide to success and as a tool to measure your progress toward meeting your academic goals. As you learn more about yourself and about your areas of interest and strength, you may need to make adjustments to your academic plan.

We encourage you to re-visit your plan periodically with an adviser or counsellor as a way to keep on track and also to acknowledge your progress.

All academic plans submitted with an appeal to have a regulation waived will be reviewed by the Associate Dean (Studies) at the end of the academic year, or probationary period, following your return. You are expected to demonstrate accountability by following through on the particulars in your academic plan.

Ultimately, however, we hope to see the academic success that your carefully crafted academic plan has set out.

Appeal Status and Decisions

How do I know my appeal was submitted ok?
Once you have clicked on Submit, you will receive an email confirmation that your appeal was received.  You will also be issued an application number and you can track the status of your appeal in the on-line appeals system using this number.

How will I be notified of the appeal decision?
All decisions are sent via email to your Queen's email address.  Please ensure your e-mail address is correct and your inbox is not full.

How long will it take to receive a decision on my appeal?
Once your appeal has been submitted and all of the supporting documentation has been received it can take up to 21 days to receive a decision.  Note that re-read requests may take longer than 21-days (typically 6 weeks) as it takes time to find and appoint a reader and review the work in question. 

How will I receive my decision letter or notification?
All decisions are sent via email toyour Queen's email address.  Please ensure your e-mail address is correct and your inbox is not full.

How can I check the status of my appeal?
Once you have clicked on Submit, you will receive an email confirmation that your appeal was received.  You will also be issued an application number and you can track the status of your appeal in the on-line appeals system using this number.

What can I do to have my appeal heard faster?
We understand that submitting an appeal is a stressful task and they are very often time-sensitive in nature so we make every effort to review appeals and send decisions as quickly and efficiently as possible.  Having a clear and detailed appeal letter and supplying all of the supporting documentation upon submission can help to speed up the process if there is no further follow up required.   

I haven’t received a decision yet and it’s been longer than 21 days.  What should I do?
You can check the status of your appeal through the on-line application.  Your decision will be sent to your Queen's e-mail address so please ensure that you check your e-mail including your junk folder.  If there is still no decision, you may follow up by calling 613-533-2470 or emailing asc.appeals@queensu.ca.  

My appeal has been granted.  How long will it take to see the changes on my transcript?
When your appeal is granted, the transcript changes are sent to the Office of the University Registrar for processing.  This can take normally anywhere from 3 days to one week.  If you need to order a transcript or if a week has passed and the changes haven’t been made yet, please notify the Faculty Office and we will arrange to have the changes made as soon as possible. 

What happens if my appeal is denied?
If your appeal is denied no changes will be made to your transcript.  You will receive information in your decision letter explaining that you have the option to appeal the Associate Dean’s decision to the Board of Studies.  An appeal to the Board of Studies must be submitted within 21 days of receiving your appeal decision letter.

What is the difference between an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) and an appeal to the Board of Studies?
The first stage of the appeal process is an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies).  If that appeal is denied and you wish to appeal the decision, the next step is to appeal to the Board of Studies.

If my appeal is denied will I get my $50.00 appeal fee back?
No.  The appeal fee is non-refundable

StatusMeaning
ReceivedYour appeal has been submitted electronically and it is sitting in the queue.
IncompleteThe Appeal Coordinator has reviewed your appeal and placed it on hold because there is information or documentation missing.
In ReviewYour appeal is complete and it has been forwarded to the Associate Dean (Studies) for consideration.
GrantedYour appeal has been granted. Please refer to your decision letter (sent to your Queen's email address) for details.
Granted with ConditionsYour appeal has been granted but with conditions or it has been partially granted only. Please refer to your decision letter (sent to your Queen's email address) for details.
DeniedYour appeal has been denied. Please refer to your decision letter (sent to your Queen's email address) for details.
WithdrawnYou have requested to have your appeal withdrawn or it is not applicable or appealable to the Associate Dean (Studies).

Appeals to Drop Courses Past the Academic Deadline

Students wishing to drop a course(s) after the last official published date for dropping course(s) may appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) to be granted permission to drop the course(s). Note that courses in which a student has received a passing grade may not be dropped. Instead students should consider an appeal for CR standing (see Academic Regulation 10.2.2).  For more information about Absence and Missed Course Work, see Academic Regulation 6.3).

A Note on Extenuating Circumstances and Late Course Drops:
The Associate Dean (Studies) will grant appeals where extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control have prevented a student from dropping a course within the published deadline. The following examples illustrate what is or is not considered an extenuating circumstance for dropping a course or courses:

Circumstances not beyond a student's control include the following:

NO = You are an upper-year student and you have not received any type of verbal or written feedback concerning your performance in the course prior to the drop deadline.

NO = You have over-committed yourself by taking on additional work shifts, running for election, serving on student government or other committees, etc.

NO = You are ill earlier in the term (but not in the week or so preceding the deadline).

Extenuating circumstances beyond a student's control include the following:

YES = You or a family member suddenly became quite ill (near the deadline date), or have (has) been ill over a lengthy period of time making it impossible to continue your studies.

YES = You are in university for the first time and have not received any type of verbal or written feedback concerning your performance in the course prior to the drop deadline.

YES = You have suddenly developed a serious personal problem which is consuming much of your time and energy making it impossible to continue your studies.

The following material must be included as a part of the appeal:

  • A letter of explanation clearly demonstrating the significantly extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, which prevented him or her from dropping the course(s) by the published deadlines. In cases where students are requesting to drop one or more specific courses (from a larger total, e.g., 12.0 of 30.0 units), students should provide a detailed explanation for the need to drop these specific courses and not others. 
  • A medical certificate or other documentation that outlines how the personal extenuating circumstances hindered the student’s ability to drop the course(s) during the published deadlines OR outlining how the personal extenuating circumstances affected the student’s academic performance should be provided with the letter. Extenuating circumstances must be supported by official documentation from an appropriate professional.

    Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.

TIME LIMIT: An appeal to drop a course must be submitted to the Arts and Science Faculty Office within 21 calendar days of the end of the examination period in which the course was offered.

Can any exceptions be made to the drop deadlines?
No, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

I just missed the drop deadline by one day.  Do I still have to appeal?
Yes, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

If my appeal to drop a course late is granted will the course disappear from my transcript?
No.  If your appeal to drop a course past the academic deadline is granted, it will appear on your transcript with a DR notation, meaning dropped.  There is no academic penalty.

Can I have the DR removed from my transcript?
No.  DR notations cannot be removed from transcripts.

Can I have the NG removed from my transcript?
No.  NG notations cannot be removed from transcripts.

Can I appeal to drop a course I passed?
No, students cannot request to drop a course with a passing grade.  You could consider appealing for Credit standing instead.

I appealed to drop a course but I haven’t received a decision yet and the exam is next week.  Should I study for it or not?
It’s your call.  It could take up to 21 days to receive a decision on your appeal so you should keep participating in the course, just in case your appeal is denied.  On the other hand, if you feel that it is not possible to salvage the course at that point, you may choose to stop participating in that course and concentrate your time and effort on your other courses that you want to keep good grades in.  For more advice, you can make an appointment to speak with an academic counsellor. 

Appeals for Credit Standing

Credit standing is reserved for a student who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but due to illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected.  See Appeal Regulation 3.3.4 for more information about Appeals on matters other than Academic Integrity.

The following material must be included as a part of the appeal:

  • A letter of explanation clearly demonstrating the significant extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, leading to student to earn a substantially lower grade than might have been expected. 
  • Supporting documentation/letter from an appropriate professional that clearly indicates ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student’s performance. The letter should verify that these effects were substantial enough to cause the academic problem. Information on the start, duration and present state of the extenuating condition is critical. Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.
  • A letter of support from the instructor. The instructor may e-mail their statements to f2deans@queensu.ca.

The instructor will be contacted to inquire if he or she supports this appeal.

TIME LIMIT: Appeals for Credit standing must be submitted no later than 21 calendar days after the end of the examination period in which the course was offered.

NOTE: A student may be granted Aegrotat or Credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units over the course of an entire degree program (see Academic Regulation 10.2.2 for more information).

What does Credit standing mean?
Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower (see Academic Regulation 6).  A course with credit standing will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned toward a degree program.

If my appeal for Credit standing is granted, what will appear on my transcript?
If your appeal for Credit standing is granted, the course will appear on your transcript with a CR notation.  A course with credit standing will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned toward a degree program.

If I fail a course can I request Credit standing?
No.  If you did not pass the course you are not eligible for Credit standing.  See Academic Regulation 10.2.

Is there a limit of how many CR and/or AG grades I can have?
Yes there is a limit.  Students may be granted aegrotat and/or credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units during their entire program. 

Why is credit standing only recommended in cases where the grade is C or lower?
We only recommend Credit standing in cases where the final grade is C or lower, otherwise it is usually in the student’s best academic interests to keep the grade earned as-is.  While Credit grades do not affect the GPA it is generally best to have as many evaluative, measureable grades on your transcript as possible.  Otherwise, your transcript can become difficult to evaluate.

Will you contact my instructor if I appeal his or her course?
In the case of an appeal for Credit or Aegrotat standing the Faculty Office will contact the course instructor to confirm eligibility for the CR or AG grade and request general feedback.  This information supplied by the instructor is included with the appeal and will be taken into consideration along with the other information provided.  No other information related to the appeal is released to the instructor unless the student has granted permission to release it.

In the case of a re-read request, the work to be re-read is sent to the Department Head, together with the student’s description of their specific concerns with the grading.  The Department Head will forward this material on to the original course instructor, and to a second, unbiased faculty member with expertise in the subject matter to review the work.  Upon receipt of the reviewers’ reports, the Department Head will assess the reports and transmit his/her recommendation to the Associate Dean (Studies). 

What is the difference between Credit standing and Aegrotat standing?
Aegrotat standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all the work of the course.  In this case, the student may be awarded a final estimated grade based on the work completed along with the notation “Aegrotat: Estimated grade”.  Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower. If this appeal is granted, the low grade will be removed from the transcript and replaced with CR.  A course with a CR notation will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned towards a Degree Program.

Appeals for Aegrotat Standing

Aegrotat standing (see Academic Regulation 10.2.1) is reserved for a student who, because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all the work for a course. At least 60 per cent of the work to be evaluating in the course (assignments, midterms, laboratories, final examination, as specified in the course outline) must be completed and passed to be eligible to make this request.  For more information about aegrotat (AG) standing, please read Appeal Regulation 3.3.3.

The following material must be included as a part of the appeal:

  • A letter of explanation clearly demonstrating the significant extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, which prevented him or her from completing all the work for the course. 
  • Supporting documentation/letter from an appropriate professional that clearly indicates ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student’s performance. The letter should verify that these effects were substantial enough to cause the academic problem. Students are encouraged to read the Appeal of Academic Decisions Section 1 portion of the Academic Calendar.  Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.
  • A letter of support from the instructor should also be included. The instructor may e-mail their statements to f2deans@queensu.ca.

The instructor will be contacted to determine

  • If he or she supports the assignment of an AG
  • That the student has completed 60 per cent of the course,
  • Any other information or insights from the instructor about the student’s participation in the course.

TIME LIMIT: Appeals for Aegrotat standing must be submitted no later than 21 calendar days after the end of the examination period in which the course is offered.

NOTE: A student may be granted Aegrotat or Credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units over the course of an entire degree program (See Academic Regulation 10.2.1).  A student must be receiving a passing grade to be eligible for AG grade.

What does Aegrotat standing mean?
Aegrotat estimated standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all of the work of the course (see Academic Regulation 6).  Aegrotat grades will be included in the student’s GPA and can be used toward as credit earned toward a degree program.

If my appeal for Aegrotat standing is granted, what will appear on my transcript?
If your appeal for Aegrotat standing is granted, the course will appear on your transcript with your estimated final grade based on the work you completed to date along with the notation “Aegrotat: Estimated Grade”.  The final estimated grade is calculated into the GPA.

How is an Aegrotat grade calculated?
An Aegrotat grade is a final estimated grade based only out of the work you submitted.  Therefore, if you completed all of the work for a course except the final exam and your final grade grade going into the exam was 75 or B, then your final grade would be assigned as B along with the notation “Aegrotat: estimated grade”.  To be eligible for an Aegrotat grade, the student must have completed at least 60% of work required for the course.

Is there a limit of how many CR and/or AG grades I can have?
Yes there is a limit.  Students may be granted aegrotat and/or credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units during their entire program.

What is the difference between Credit standing and Aegrotat standing?
Aegrotat standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all the work of the course.  In this case, the student may be awarded a final estimated grade based on the work completed along with the notation “Aegrotat: Estimated grade”.  Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower. If this appeal is granted, the low grade will be removed from the transcript and replaced with CR.  A course with a CR notation will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned towards a Degree Program.

Appeals to take 3rd & 4th year Courses on LOP

If I am appealing to take third or fourth year courses away on a letter of permission, what information and documentation is required?
To appeal to take third or fourth year courses away on a letter of permission, you must explain in your appeal letter why you are unable to take these courses at Queen’s and what your plan is for completing all of your remaining degree requirements.  We also require some supporting documentation to confirm your extenuating circumstances as well as a letter from your Undergraduate Chair confirming that the Department supports your appeal and confirming how these courses will be used to meet your degree requirements. 

Requirement to Withdraw Appeals

To Waive the Requirement to Withdraw for One Year

A ruling of a “Requirement to Withdraw for One Year” is placed on a student’s transcript under the following circumstances:

  • If a student has a Cumulative GPA of less than 0.70 at the time of assessment; or
  • If a student is on academic probation at the time of assessment and has a Cumulative GPA of less than 1.60.

The following material must be included as a part of the appeal:

  • A letter requesting that a requirement to withdraw be waived must clearly demonstrate how the significant extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, affected his or her academic performance. A student should clearly outline an Academic Plan for how he or she plans to be successful in his or her academic study should the appeal be granted and the requirement to withdraw be waived. In cases where the extenuating circumstances are ongoing rather than temporary, the student should also indicate how these personal challenges will be managed if the requirement to withdraw is waived. 
  • Supporting documentation/letter from an appropriate professional that clearly indicates ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student’s performance. The letter should verify that these effects were substantial enough to cause the academic problem. Information on the start, duration and present state of the extenuating condition is critical. Lastly, a clear statement on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed so that they no longer have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance. Students are encouraged to read the Appeal of Academic Decisions Section 1 portion of the Academic Calendar.  Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.

NOTE: Should the requirement to withdraw be waived, the Associate Dean (Studies) may pose conditions on the student’s subsequent registration or status (from full-time to part-time etc).

TIME LIMIT: Appeals of the requirement to withdraw must be submitted within 21 calendar days of the receipt of the letter from the Associate Dean (Studies) informing the student of the decision that the student must withdraw.

To Waive the Requirement to Withdraw for Three Years

A ruling of a “Requirement to Withdraw for Three Years” is placed on a student’s transcript under the following circumstances (see Academic Regulation 13.5.1 for more information):

  • A student has a Cumulative GPA of less than 0.70 at the time of assessment and has previously been required to withdraw for One Year, even if that previous requirement to withdraw was waived on appeal; or
  • is on academic probation at the time of assessment and has a Cumulative GPA of less than 1.60 and has previously been required to withdraw. Note that any student who has been required to withdraw and returns to studies is automatically placed on academic probation under Academic Regulation 13.3. Therefore, any student previously required to withdraw must achieve a Cumulative GPA of greater than 1.60 at their next academic assessment upon their return to studies, or they will be required to withdraw for a minimum of Three Years.

The following material must be included as a part of the appeal:

  • A letter requesting that a requirement to withdraw be waived must clearly demonstrate how significantly extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, affected his or her academic performance. 
  • A letter requesting that a requirement to withdraw be waived must clearly demonstrate how the significant extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, affected his or her academic performance. A student should clearly outline an Academic Plan for how he or she plans to be successful in his or her academic study should the appeal be granted and the requirement to withdraw be waived. See Preparing an Academic Plan. In cases where the extenuating circumstances are ongoing rather than temporary, the student should also indicate how these personal challenges will be managed if the requirement to withdraw is waived. 
  • Supporting documentation/letter from an appropriate professional that clearly indicates ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student’s performance. The letter should verify that these effects were substantial enough to cause the academic problem. Information on the start, duration and present state of the extenuating condition is critical. Lastly, a clear statement on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed so that they no longer have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance. Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.

NOTE: Should the requirement to withdraw be waived, the Associate Dean (Studies) may pose conditions on the student’s subsequent registration or status (from full-time to part-time, etc).

TIME LIMIT: Appeals of the requirement to withdraw must be submitted within 21 calendar days of the receipt of the letter from the Associate Dean (Studies) informing the student of the decision that the student must withdraw.

NOTE: After the minimum withdraw period of three years, a student who wishes to return to the Faculty of Arts and Science must appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies). The appeal should contain an outline of what the student has done during the period of withdrawal and an academic plan for the completion of their degree program. The appeal should provide evidence of his or her capacity to succeed in the proposed program. Should the requirement to withdraw be waived, the Associate Dean (Studies) may impose conditions on the student’s subsequent registration or status (from full-time to part-time, etc).

I appealed to waive a requirement to withdraw and it was granted. What is my current academicstatus?
If you are returning to your studies following a requirement to withdraw or if your appeal to waive a requirement to withdraw has been successful, it is very important to be aware of your current academic standing in the Faculty of Arts and Science. This document provides general information and it is strongly recommended that you consult with an academic advisor in the Faculty Office to review your individual academic record as well as your academic plan for the upcoming terms to help ensure that your return to studies will be successful.

Why was I required to withdraw?
You were required to withdraw for one year or for a minimum of three years because your cumulative GPA was too low. To be in go od academic standing, Arts and Science students must maintain a minimum GPA of 1.60. This is the minimum GPA required to graduate with a General degree in the Faculty of Arts and Science so if you are not performing at a level that is allowing you to progress in your studies, you are asked to withdraw. The intention of the requirement to withdraw is to give you some time to reflect and assess what was not working and construct a realistic and effective academic plan to help you successfully complete your degree.

What is my current academic standing?
When you return to studies after a requirement to withdraw or if your requirement to withdraw has been waived on appeal , you are still considered to be on academic probation. This means that you must raise you r cumulative GPA to 1.60 by the time your academic record is assessed again.

What happens if I raise my cumulative GPA to 1.60 or higher?
If your cumulative GPA is at 1.60 or higher when your academic record is assessed again, then you will be released from academic probation and return to good academic standing.

What happens if I do not raise my cumulative GPA to 1.60?
If your cumulative GPA is less than 1.60 when your academic record is assessed again, then you will be required to withdraw again. If yo u were required to withdraw for one year during the previous assessment period, you will be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years during the next assessment period. If you were required to withdraw for a minimum of three years during the previous assessment period, you will be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years again during the next assessment period.

When will my academic record be assessed again?
Student academic records are only assessed by the Faculty Office once per year and this assessment takes place at the end of the winter term once all of the final grades are available (usually in mid - May). Your record will only be assessed if you have completed a minimum of 18.0 additional units since the time of your previous assessment. Assessment of academic standing is based solely on cumulative GPA. If you have not completed 18.0 additional units by the next assessment period, then you will remain on academic probation. You are not required to take a minimum course load upon y our return – you may take as few courses as you are comfortable with.

Can I appeal to waive a requirement to withdraw and drop courses past the academic deadline in the same appeal?
Yes. If the appeal is granted and the courses are dropped, it could result in the Requirement to Withdraw ruling being removed altogether if it no longer applies.

I have submitted my appeal requesting to waive the requirement to withdraw but I haven't received a decision yet. Should I register for courses in July/August or not?
Provided that you submitted your appeal within the deadline indicated on your notification letter, you will be permitted to register in courses for the following year, pending the decision on your appeal.

Appeal for Extensions of Incomplete Grades

As outlined in Academic Regulation 10.2.4, a student affected by extenuating circumstances may ask the course instructor for an incomplete standing (IN) for a maximum of one full term after the completion of a course. If the first request is granted, a further request to submit incomplete work after that term has elapsed must be make through a formal appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies).  For more information, read Appeal Regulation 3.3.6.

The following material must be included as a part of the appeal:

  • A letter of explanation clearly demonstrating the significant extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, which prevented him or her from completing the work during the term. 
  • Supporting documentation/letter from an appropriate professional that clearly indicates ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student’s performance. The letter should verify that these effects were substantial enough to cause the academic problem. Information on the start, duration and present state of the extenuating condition is critical. Lastly, a clear statement on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed so that they no longer have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance. Students are encouraged to read the Appeal of Academic Decisions Section 1 portion of the Academic Calendar. Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.
  • A note from the instructor agreeing to a final date for completion of the coursework in question should also be included. The instructor may e-mail their statements to f2deans@queensu.ca.

TIME LIMIT: Appeals for the extension of an IN must be made before the end of the term following the term in which the course was offered.

If I’m appealing for an extension of an incomplete grade, what should I submit for documentation?
You will need to submit some documentation to confirm the extenuating circumstances that prevented you from completing the outstanding work within the extended deadline.  You will also need to provide confirmation from your instructor that he or she is agreeable to a further extension and to what date.

It is past 21-days since my course finished but I had an IN grade.  Do I have to appeal to have my appeal heard late?
If you were assigned an incomplete grade in a course then that course is still considered to be active until the final grade is assigned or the IN expires.  You have 21-days to appeal after that time.

When do incomplete grades expire?
IN grades expire at the end of the following term.  For example, if you received an incomplete grade in a fall term course, the IN would expire at the end of the following winter term.

Re-Reads

How does a re-read work?
From Appeal Regulations – effective May 1, 2014

3.3.7 To Request a Review of Instructors’ Decisions on Grading of Final Examinations and/or Term Work
A student may request a review of any grade assigned in a course subject to the marking scheme set out by the course instructor(s) if the student can:

  • clearly articulate grounds for reconsideration and identify specifically the substance of an answer where the student feels the mark given was not evaluated fully;
  • show, in an objective answer, that a correct answer has been counted as incorrect;
  • show, in a subjective or essay answer, that the response has been under evaluated substantially; and
  • provide relevant documentation to support the appeal (i.e. class notes, etc.).

It is the responsibility of the student to preserve all exercises, papers, reports and other graded material for the course and to submit these materials with the appeal. In any formal appeal of term work, the student must accept the responsibility for ensuring that the work presented for reassessment is in fact the original term work submitted for evaluation (see Academic Regulation 11).

As a first step, the student should request an informal review with the instructor concerned, and instructors are strongly encouraged to consent. If the informal review process is unsuccessful, the student may ask for the assistance of the Office of the Associate Dean (Studies) in order to facilitate a review through an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies). This request should be made within 21 calendar days of the grade being received. Usually the instructor will provide a reconsidered grade within 21 calendar days of the receipt of the request.

The reconsideration of the work in question will be undertaken by two reviewers appointed by the Office of the Associate Dean (Studies) or delegate (normally the Head of the relevant academic unit). One of the two reviewers will be the original instructor, unless the student can demonstrate bias or other conflict on the part of the original instructor. In such cases the original instructor may be asked to provide any documentation relevant to the review. The review will involve a rereading of the work in question.

An appeal on grading of term work must be submitted within 21 calendar days after the student has received the mark from the instructor.

How long will it take to receive a decision on my appeal?
Once your appeal has been submitted and all of the supporting documentation and materials have been received it can take up to 21 days to receive a decision. 

Do I have to talk to my instructor before submitting an appeal for a re-read?
We recommend that you ask your instructor to review the work with you informally as a first step. Many times, questions and concerns can be addressed at this level and a formal re-read is not required.

Where can I find more information about Re-Reads?
Please see Appeal Regulations 3.3.7 and 3.3.8.

Appeal Fee

If my appeal is denied will I get my $50.00 appeal fee back?
No. The appeal fee is non-refundable.

Do I have to pay a separate appeal fee for each course I am appealing?
No. There is one flat fee of $50.00 to submit an appeal and there is no limit on the number of requests you can make in one appeal.

Can I submit my appeal now and pay later?
No. Your appeal cannot be submitted electronically without payment.

Board of Studies

What happens if my appeal is denied?
If your appeal is denied no changes will be made to your transcript.  You will receive information in your decision letter explaining that you have the option to appeal the Associate Dean’s decision to the Board of Studies.  An appeal to the Board of Studies must be submitted within 21 days of receiving your appeal decision letter.

What is the difference between an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) and an appeal to the Board of Studies?
The first stage of the appeal process is an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies).  If that appeal is denied and you wish to appeal the decision, the next step is to appeal to the Board of Studies.

Do I have to pay another appeal fee to appeal to the Board of Studies?
No. There is no additional fee to appeal to the Board of Studies.

How much time do I have to appeal to the Board of Studies?
You have 21 days from the time your decision letter is sent to submit your appeal to the Board of Studies.

How do I submit an appeal to the Board of Studies?
See Board of Studies Appeal Form.

What to Expect at the Board of Studies: Tips for Students

What is the Board of Studies?
The Board of Studies is the final appeal in the Faculty of Arts and Science for students' appeals of incomplete grades, final grades, requirements to withdraw and other decisions determined by the Associate Dean (Studies) (See Arts and Science Calendar).

Who is on the Board?
The Board membership consists of

  • three students
  • nine faculty members from a cross-section of Arts and Science departments

All Board hearings shall be heard by four members, one of whom in normally a student. Members who are close to the case, or for other reasons need to declare a conflict of interest, will not be in attendance.

  • a secretary to the Board and
  • an informational officer from the Arts and Science Student Services Office.

The Associate Dean (Studies) is not a member of the Board but will attend when a student chooses to appear before the Board. The Associate Dean (Studies) is there to clarify specific aspects of his or her decision and to speak to the larger context of the decision within the Faculty of Arts and Science policies, regulations and practices.

What do I need to know before my meeting with the Board?

  • You are permitted, in fact encouraged, to have representation at the hearing. You may wish to bring a trusted friend, family member, student advocate, a Dispute Resolution Advisor or even legal representation.
  • The Board will have received and read your written appeal in advance of the meeting.
  • During the meeting, anyone can call for a break in the proceedings. If you feel you would like a break to compose your thoughts, you may request one from the Chair at any time.

What will happen at my meeting with the Board?

  1. Prior to inviting you into the meeting, the Board will take a few minutes to review any jurisdictional matters and to identify anything in the documentation that requires clarification.
  2. After you are called into the meeting, the Chair will ask members to introduce themselves.
  3. After introductions, you will be invited to make a presentation clarifying any aspect of the information you have presented to the Board in written form. Since the Board will have read the written submission and already be familiar with facts presented by you, your professor(s) (if applicable) and the decision of the Associate Dean (Studies), it is not necessary to re-state your claims. Any introductory comments you might make should take no longer than 5 or 10 minutes.
  4. After your presentation, the Chair will ask the Associate Dean (Studies) if he or she wishes to make any statements concerning his or her decision, past precedents or the academic regulations related to the case.
  5. At this point in the proceedings, the Board may ask questions clarifying what you have said or written. These questions are intended to offer you a full and fair opportunity to state your case. It is important therefore to answer the questions directly and completely.
  6. After questions from the Board, all parties will be given a chance to make any final or summary comments. If you wish to do so, it is an opportunity for you to summarize the main points of your case.
  7. Following presentations and questions, all participants will leave to allow the Board to discuss the case and come to a decision. The decision of the Board will be to uphold the Associate Dean (Studies) decision, modify the decision or grant the student's appeal.

What happens after the meeting?

  1. Immediately following the meeting, the Secretary to the Board will email you with a brief notice of the Board's decision.
  2. The Chair of the Board will compose a letter outlining the decision, the reasons for the decision and the possibilities for an appeal (if the decision is not in your favour). This letter will be sent to you by mail.
  3. Decisions of the Board may be appealed on procedural grounds by either party to the University Student Appeals Board by filing a written notice of intention to appeal with the Secretary of Senate within two (2) weeks of receipt of the Board's decision.

Note: Any change in academic registration may impact government student financial assistance eligibility and/or funding. Please consult with the Student Awards Office, Office of the University Registrar, Gordon Hall, to understand the potential implications of changes to course or program registration and/or the consequences of not successfully completing the required course load.

June 2014 Appeals

Students who wish to appeal the decision of the Associate Dean (Studies) may submit an appeal to the Board of Studies.  Students must meet the following 2014 Board of Studies dates in order to be considered in time for Fall 2014 enrolment:

  • August 1 last date to submit appeal to the Board of Studies
  • August 11 last date to review appeal package (electronically on QShare)

Board meetings will be scheduled during for following dates. Students who wish to attend the Board meeting must be available during this time period:

  • August 25-29
  • September 2-5
  • September 8-12

Online Appeal Submission

The process for submitting Academic Appeals in Arts and Science has changed.  The paper-based form has been replaced with a comprehensive and instructional online version.  Please read the instructions found on the first page of the online submission very carefully and have your documentation prepared and ready before you begin filling out the form.  You cannot save a partially completed Form, so it might be helpful to save a Word document of your letter to cut and paste in case you get interrupted or lose internet service. 

You will need your Queen's netid and password to logon to the online Submission Form.

Submit an Appeal here

Have Questions?

Call us at 613-533-2470 or email us.

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