Faculty of Arts & Science
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Academic Appeals

The Academic Regulations for the Faculty of Arts and Science are designed to ensure that academic standards are upheld and that all students are treated fairly and equitably. The Faculty does, however, understand that there are occasions in which extenuating circumstances, that is circumstances beyond a student's control, adversely affect a student's performance at Queen's University. The appeal process is available to reconsider the suitability of sanctions or penalties imposed upon a student in light of information brought forward by the student concerning such extenuating circumstances. Appeals within the Faculty of Arts and Science are governed by the sections on Academic Regulations and Appeal Regulations in the Calendar.

There are three levels of appeal in the Faculty of Arts and Science. The first two levels are located within the faculty of Arts and Science and make a decision on the academic issues related to the appeal.

The third and final level is an appeal to the University Student Appeal Board and is an appeal on matters of process only.

Read more about the three levels of Appeals in the Faculty of Arts and Science:

First Level: Appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies)

The first level of appeal is an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies).

Submit an Online Appeal here

Below you will find the information you need to help you make an appeal.

General Appeal Questions

What Can I appeal?  Appeal Options and Limitations

What Do I Need to Include with my Appeal?

Appeal Submission, Status and Decisions

Appeal Deadline and Appeals Requesting to Waive the Deadline

 

General Appeal Questions

Do I have to appeal?  Are there any other options?

If you wish to pursue any of the appeal options listed (see What can I appeal?), yes you must submit an appeal for your request to be considered. This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

Where can I find information on the academic regulations?

See: (Academic Regulations)

Do I have to submit a formal appeal?  Can I just talk to someone instead?

If you wish to pursue any of the appeal options listed (see What can I appeal?), yes you must submit an appeal for your request to be considered. This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

If I appeal will I have to speak with the Associate Dean (Studies)?

You will not be required to meet with anyone concerning your appeal unless further clarification is required. 

Who will see my appeal? 

Your appeal will be reviewed by the Appeals Coordinator to ensure that it is complete and contains all of the information the Associate Dean (Studies) requires to make a decision.  Your appeal will then be reviewed by the Associate Dean (Studies).  A copy of the appeal will remain in your student file in the Faculty Office. No information in your student file can be released to a third party, including other offices on campus without your consent. 

What are my appeal rights as a student?

See the Senate Policy on Student Appeals, Rights and Discipline (SARD): http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/policies/senateandtrustees/SARDPolicy.pdf  For more information, contact the Office of the University Ombudsperson, room 237 Robert Sutherland Hall, 613-533-6495, ombuds@queensu.ca

Is my appeal confidential?

Any information submitted to the Faculty Office is confidential and will not be shared or released to any third party, including other offices on campus without your consent.

I’m not sure if I should appeal or not.  Who can I ask for advice?

You may contact the Faculty Office to schedule an appointment with an Academic Counsellor. 

I’m not sure I have strong enough grounds for appealing.  Who can I ask for help?

You should contact the Faculty Office to schedule an appointment with an Academic Counsellor. 

What is considered to be an extenuating circumstance?

An extenuating circumstance is defined as a significant physical or psychological event that is beyond a student’s control and debilitating to his or her academic performance. In general, with the exception of appeals related to a review of course work or non-academic discipline where other criteria will apply, appeals are only granted where there are significantly extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, which would merit the waiving of an academic regulation. These kinds of extraordinary situations should be supported by official documentation from an appropriate professional.

What about unresolved circumstances?

The appeals process does not compensate for extenuating circumstances that the student is unable to resolve, or for which the student is unwilling to actively seek accommodation. In addition, the appeals process does not compensate for extenuating circumstances that are actively being accommodated, for example where a student’s permanent disabilities are being accommodated through the university’s Disability Services Office. Multiple appeals citing the same extenuating circumstances will be reviewed very closely. This review may include, with the permission of the student, consultation with the appropriate professionals involved to obtain more detailed information. In order for such an appeal to succeed, there must be convincing evidence that the circumstances that affected the student’s academic performance will be resolved within a reasonable timeline, or will be appropriately managed on an ongoing basis.

What is not considered to be an extenuating circumstance?

Circumstances not beyond a student's control include the following:

NO = You are an upper-year student and you have not received any type of verbal or written feedback concerning your performance in the course prior to the drop deadline.

NO = You have over-committed yourself by taking on additional work shifts, running for election, serving on student government or other committees, etc.

NO = You are ill earlier in the term (but not in the week or so preceding the deadline).

Extenuating circumstances beyond a student's control include the following:

YES = You or a family member suddenly became quite ill (near the deadline date), or have (has) been ill over a lengthy period of time making it impossible to continue your studies.

YES = You are in university for the first time and have not received any type of verbal or written feedback concerning your performance in the course prior to the drop deadline.

YES = You have suddenly developed a serious personal problem which is consuming much of your time and energy making it impossible to continue your studies.


I’m not sure what to appeal.  Who can I ask for help?

You should contact the Faculty Office to schedule an appointment with an Academic Counsellor.

I’m a Commerce /Applied Science/Nursing student and I want to appeal an elective course in Arts and Science.  Which faculty should I appeal through?

You should appeal through your home Faculty. Therefore, if you are Commerce /Applied Science/Nursing student, you must appeal through the School of Business /Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science/School of Nursing, even if it is an Arts and Science course you are appealing.

I’m an Arts and Science student and I want to appeal a Commerce/Nursing/Applied Science course.  Which faculty should I appeal through?

You should appeal through your home Faculty. Therefore, if you are an Arts and Science student, you must appeal through the Faculty of Arts and Science, even if it is a Commerce, Engineering or Nursing course you are appealing.

Can I cancel an appeal once I have submitted it?

Yes, you may withdraw an appeal if a decision has not yet been made.

Can I cancel or reverse an appeal after a decision is made?

No.  Once an appeal decision is made, the appeal cannot be retracted.  

Is there a deadline to submit an appeal?

Yes.  Appeals must be received within 21 days after a final grade has been posted or an academic ruling has been made.  

I don’t have a NetID – how can I submit my appeal?

You can obtain a NetID at: http://www.queensu.ca/its/netid/activation.html   If you require further assistance, please contact the Faculty Office.

Can I appeal the same time period twice?  

No, students are not able to revisit the same time period in submitting subsequent appeals.  For example, if a student has appealed to drop one or more courses without academic penalty in the Fall term, he or she cannot make a subsequent different appeal in relation to that same time period.

Can any exceptions be made to the drop deadlines?

No, an appeal is required. This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

I just missed the drop deadline by one day.  Do I still have to appeal?

Yes, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

Can I ask to drop more than one course in my appeal?

Yes.  There is no limit on how many courses you can appeal.  Once you have entered your first course, click on “add another course” and a new entry will appear.

Do I have to pay a separate appeal fee for each course I am appealing?

No.  There is one flat fee of $50.00 to submit an appeal and there is no limit on the number of requests you can make in one appeal.

Can I make more than one request in my appeal?

Yes.  You may ask for a number of different appeal options depending on your circumstances.  For example, a student may request to waive a requirement to withdraw and request to drop courses late in one appeal.  A student may also request Aegrotat standing in a course, Credit standing in a course and a late drop in another course all taken in the same term.

Do I have to tell my instructor I am appealing his or her course?

Not necessarily.  If you are appealing to drop a course past the academic deadline, we will not contact your instructor.  If you are appealing to receive Credit or Aegrotat standing in a course, we will contact your instructors in those courses to confirm eligibility for those grades notations and to seek general feedback.  No details of your appeal are shared with your instructors. 

Will you contact my instructor if I appeal his or her course?

In the case of an appeal for Credit or Aegrotat standing the Faculty Office will contact the course instructor to confirm eligibility for the CR or AG grade and request general feedback.  This information supplied by the instructor is included with the appeal and will be taken into consideration along with the other information provided.  No other information related to the appeal is released to the instructor unless the student has granted permission to release it.

In the case of a re-read request, the work to be re-read is sent to the Department Head, together with the student’s description of their specific concerns with the grading. The Department Head will forward this material on to the original course instructor, and to a second, unbiased faculty member with expertise in the subject matter to review the work.  Upon receipt of the reviewers’ reports, the Department Head will assess the reports and transmit his/her recommendation to the Associate Dean (Studies). 

My instructor does not support my appeal.  What should I do?

You may proceed with an appeal even if your instructor does not support it.  The Associate Dean (Studies) will take all information presented in the appeal into consideration when making a decision. 

 

What Can I Appeal?  Appeal Options and Limitations

What can I appeal?

Below you will find the appeal options available as well as some frequently asked questions specific to those types of appeals.  For more information on the appeal options, please see the current Appeal Regulations in the Faculty of Arts and Science Academic Calendar.

APPEAL TO DROP COURSES PAST THE ACADEMIC DEADLINE (see Appeal Regulations)

Can any exceptions be made to the drop deadlines?

No, an appeal is required. This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

I just missed the drop deadline by one day.  Do I still have to appeal?

Yes, an appeal is required. This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

If my appeal to drop a course late is granted will the course disappear from my transcript?

No. If your appeal to drop a course past the academic deadline is granted, it will appear on your transcript with a DR notation, meaning dropped.  There is no academic penalty.

Can I have the DR removed from my transcript?

No. DR notations cannot be removed from transcripts.

Can I have the NG removed from my transcript?

No.  NG notations cannot be removed from transcripts.

Can I appeal to drop a course I passed?

No, students cannot request to drop a course with a passing grade.  You could consider appealing for Credit standing instead.

I appealed to drop a course but I haven’t received a decision yet and the exam is next week.  Should I study for it or not?

It’s your call.  It could take up to 21 days to receive a decision on your appeal so you should keep participating in the course, just in case your appeal is denied.  On the other hand, if you feel that it is not possible to salvage the course at that point, you may choose to stop participating in that course and concentrate your time and effort on your other courses that you want to keep good grades in.  For more advice, you can make an appointment to speak with an academic counsellor. 

APPEAL TO ADD COURSES PAST THE ACADEMIC DEADLINE (see Appeal Regulations)

Can any exceptions be made to the add deadlines?
No, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

I just missed the add deadline by one day.  Do I still have to appeal?
Yes, an appeal is required.  This is to ensure that the process is followed correctly, consistently and fairly for all students.   

My appeal to add a course late was granted so I dropped my “back-up” course.  Why does my account say that I owe tuition? 

When a course is added late the full tuition charge is applied to your student account.  However, when you drop a course, the amount of tuition money refunded depends on the date you drop it.  For example, if you drop it one day after the add-drop deadline (which is also the financial deadline), then you will be refunded 50% of the tuition for the dropped course (therefore, it will only cover half of the amount charged for the course you added late).  See the Refund Schedule at www.queensu.ca/registrar for more information.

The course I wanted to add was full right up to the add deadline but a space opened up after the deadline passed.  Do I still have to appeal to add it?

Yes. An appeal is required. 

What other information and/or documentation do I need to include with this appeal?

Any appeal to add a course late must include a note from both the instructor of the course and the Undergraduate Chair of the Department in which the course is being offered supporting your request to add the course late. It is also important to specify what lecture/lab/tutorial section numbers you would like to add (there must be space available in the sections you are requesting or a note from the individuals above indicating their permission to override the enrolment limits and there cannot be a timetable conflict) You will also be required to include an academic plan which explains how you intend to catch up on the material you missed in the course.

APPEAL FOR CREDIT STANDING IN A COURSE (see Appeal Regulations)

What does Credit standing mean?

Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower (see Academic Regulation 6). A course with credit standing will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned toward a degree program.

If my appeal for Credit standing is granted, what will appear on my transcript?

If your appeal for Credit standing is granted, the course will appear on your transcript with a CR notation.  A course with credit standing will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned toward a degree program.

If I fail a course can I request Credit standing?

No.  If you did not pass the course you are not eligible for Credit standing.  See Academic Regulation 10.

Is there a limit of how many CR and/or AG grades I can have?

Yes there is a limit. Students may be granted aegrotat and/or credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units during their entire program. 

Why is credit standing only recommended in cases where the grade is C or lower? 

We only recommend Credit standing in cases where the final grade is C or lower, otherwise it is usually in the student’s best academic interests to keep the grade earned as-is.  While Credit grades do not affect the GPA it is generally best to have as many evaluative, measureable grades on your transcript as possible.  Otherwise, your transcript can become difficult to evaluate.

Will you contact my instructor if I appeal his or her course?

In the case of an appeal for Credit or Aegrotat standing the Faculty Office will contact the course instructor to confirm eligibility for the CR or AG grade and request general feedback.  This information supplied by the instructor is included with the appeal and will be taken into consideration along with the other information provided.  No other information related to the appeal is released to the instructor unless the student has granted permission to release it.

What is the difference between Credit standing and Aegrotat standing?

Aegrotat standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all the work of the course.  In this case, the student may be awarded a final estimated grade based on the work completed along with the notation “Aegrotat: Estimated grade”.  Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower. If this appeal is granted, the low grade will be removed from the transcript and replaced with CR.  A course with a CR notation will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned towards a Degree Program.

 

APPEAL FOR AEGROTAT STANDING IN A COURSE (see Appeal Regulations)

What does Aegrotat standing mean?

Aegrotat estimated standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all of the work of the course (see Academic Regulation 6).  Aegrotat grades will be included in the student’s GPA and can be used toward as credit earned toward a degree program.

If my appeal for Aegrotat standing is granted, what will appear on my transcript?

If your appeal for Aegrotat standing is granted, the course will appear on your transcript with your estimated final grade based on the work you completed to date along with the notation “Aegrotat: Estimated Grade”.  The final estimated grade is calculated into the GPA.

How is an Aegrotat grade calculated?

An Aegrotat grade is a final estimated grade based only out of the work you submitted.  Therefore, if you completed all of the work for a course except the final exam and your final grade grade going into the exam was 75 or B, then your final grade would be assigned as B along with the notation “Aegrotat: estimated grade”.  To be eligible for an Aegrotat grade, the student must have completed at least 60% of work required for the course.

Is there a limit of how many CR and/or AG grades I can have?

Yes there is a limit.  Students may be granted aegrotat and/or credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units during their entire program.

What is the difference between Credit standing and Aegrotat standing?

Aegrotat standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all the work of the course.  In this case, the student may be awarded a final estimated grade based on the work completed along with the notation “Aegrotat: Estimated grade”.  Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed all of the work of the course, including the final examination, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower. If this appeal is granted, the low grade will be removed from the transcript and replaced with CR.  A course with a CR notation will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned towards a Degree Program.

APPEAL FOR AN EXTENSION OF AN INCOMPLETE GRADE (see Appeal Regulations)

If I’m appealing for an extension of an incomplete grade, what should I submit for documentation?

You will need to submit some documentation to confirm the extenuating circumstances that prevented you from completing the outstanding work within the extended deadline.  You will also need to provide confirmation from your instructor that he or she is agreeable to a further extension and to what date.

It is past 21-days since my course finished but I had an IN grade.  Do I have to appeal to have my appeal heard late?
If you were assigned an incomplete grade in a course then that course is still considered to be active until the final grade is assigned or the IN expires.  You have 21-days to appeal after that time.

When do incomplete grades expire?
IN grades expire at the end of the following term. For example, if you received an incomplete grade in a fall term course, the IN would expire at the end of the following winter term.

REQUEST A REVIEW OF INSTRUCTORS’ DECISIONS ON GRADING OF A FINAL EXAMINATION AND/OR TERM WORK (see Appeal Regulations)

How do these appeals work?

A student may request a review of any grade assigned in a course subject to the marking scheme set out by the course instructor(s) if the student can:

  • clearly articulate grounds for reconsideration and identify specifically the substance of an answer where the student feels the mark given was not evaluated fully;
  • show, in an objective answer, that a correct answer has been counted as incorrect;
  • show, in a subjective or essay answer, that the response has been under evaluated substantially; and
  • provide relevant documentation to support the appeal (i.e. class notes, etc.).

It is the responsibility of the student to preserve all exercises, papers, reports and other graded material for the course and to submit these materials with the appeal. In any formal appeal of term work, the student must accept the responsibility for ensuring that the work presented for reassessment is in fact the original term work submitted for evaluation (see Academic Regulation 11).

The reconsideration of the work in question will be undertaken by two reviewers appointed by the Office of the Associate Dean (Studies) or delegate (normally the Head of the relevant academic unit). One of the two reviewers will be the original instructor, unless the student can demonstrate bias or other conflict on the part of the original instructor. In such cases the original instructor may be asked to provide any documentation relevant to the review. The review will involve a rereading of the work in question.

An appeal on grading of term work must be submitted within 21 calendar days after the student has received the mark from the instructor.

How long will it take to receive a decision on my appeal?
Once your appeal has been submitted and all of the supporting documentation and materials have been received it can take up to 21 days to receive a decision. 

Do I have to talk to my instructor before submitting an appeal for a review of my work?
We recommend that you ask your instructor to review the work with you informally as a first step. Many times, questions and concerns can be addressed at this level and a formal review is not required.

What if my instructor won’t review my work?

Instructors are strongly encouraged to consent to informally review work with a student. If the informal review process is unsuccessful (the instructor does not agree or the student is unsatisfied with the review), the student may request a formal review of the instructor's decision on the grade.

Is there a deadline to make this type of appeal?

Yes.  This request should be made within 21 calendar days of the grade being received on the work.

Where can I find more information about this?
Please see Appeal Regulations.

APPEAL TO TAKE 3rd AND 4th YEAR COURSES ON A LETTER OF PERMISSION THROUGH ANOTHER UNIVERSITY (see Appeal Regulations)

If I am appealing to take third or fourth year courses away on a letter of permission, what information and documentation is required? 

To appeal to take third or fourth year courses away on a letter of permission, you must explain in your appeal letter why you are unable to take these courses at Queen’s and what your plan is for completing all of your remaining degree requirements.  We also require some supporting documentation to confirm your extenuating circumstances as well as a letter from your Undergraduate Chair confirming that the Department supports your appeal and confirming how these courses will be used to meet your degree requirements. 

Do I have to appeal to take 3rd or 4th year summer term courses on a letter of permission?

No.  You do not have to appeal to take upper year courses in the summer term on a letter of permission.  You may simply apply for the letter of permission.

What if I only want to take one or two upper year courses on a letter of permission? 

You may apply for a letter of permission to take up to 6.0 units in upper year courses on a letter of permission without having to make an appeal.

What about elective courses?

You may apply for a letter of permission to take up to 6.0 units in upper year courses on a letter of permission without having to make an appeal.  If you have completed all of the requirements for your Plan but you still have more than 6.0 units in elective courses to complete, you must make an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies). 

How many courses can I appeal to take on a letter of permission?

There is a limit on how many courses you receive transfer credit for (TR) that can be counted toward your degree requirements.  See Academic Regulation 15.

What kind of information do you need from my Departmental Undergraduate Chair?

We require confirmation that your Undergraduate Chair supports your request to take the upper year courses you need for your degree at another institution and he or she has reviewed your plan with you to ensure that the courses you will take on the letter of permission will actually fulfill the outstanding requirements for your degree and will allow you to graduate.


APPEAL TO WAIVE THE REQUIREMENT TO WITHDRAW FOR ONE YEAR (see
Appeal Regulations)

I appealed to waive a requirement to withdraw and it was granted.  What is my current academic status? 

See:  Returning from Requirement to Withdraw

What is an academic plan?

See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]

Why is it important to include an academic plan in my appeal?

A strong academic plan can increase your chances for a successful appeal.  See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]

How detailed should my academic plan be?

A strong academic plan is detailed, specific and realistic.  It should address all of the key questions and contain all the essential components.  See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]   

Is there a deadline to submit these appeals?

Yes, there is a deadline to appeal the requirement to withdraw for one year and it is indicated on the notification letter you received through SOLUS (normally 21 days from the date the letter was issued). 

What happens if I miss this deadline?

If you had extenuating circumstances that caused you to miss the appeal deadline, you may submit an appeal requesting to waive the 21-day appeal deadline so your appeal may be heard late. If the appeal is granted, your appeal requesting to waive the requirement to withdraw will be heard but your negative service indicator will not be removed. Therefore, you will need to receive a positive decision on your appeal before you will be permitted to register in courses.

I’m still waiting to receive my appeal decision but the Course Selection Period is starting soon.  What should I do?

If you submitted your appeal by the deadline indicated on your requirement to withdraw notification letter, then we will remove the negative service indicator from your SOLUS account so you can register in courses during the regular Course Selection Period, pending the decision on your appeal.

I haven’t received a decision on my appeal yet.  Should I register in courses for next year or not?

Yes, you may go ahead and register in courses pending the decision on your appeal.

What if my appeal is denied and I’m registered in courses?  Do I have to drop them?

If your appeal is denied, we will not remove you from your courses until you have  exhausted all of your appeal options.  You have the option to appeal the Associate Deans’ decision to the Board of Studies.  If you pursue this option, you will be permitted to continue participating in your courses pending the outcome of that appeal.

Can I appeal to waive a requirement to withdraw and drop courses past the academic deadline in the same appeal?

Yes. If the appeal is granted and the courses are dropped, it could result in the Requirement to Withdraw ruling being removed altogether if it no longer applies.

I have submitted my appeal requesting to waive the requirement to withdraw but I haven't received a decision yet. Should I register for courses in July/August or not?

Provided that you submitted your appeal within the deadline indicated on your notification letter, you will be permitted to register in courses for the following year, pending the decision on your appeal.

 

APPEAL REQUESTING TO WAIVE THE REQUIREMENT TO WITHDRAW FOR A MINIMUM OF THREE YEARS (see Appeal Regulations)

I appealed to waive a requirement to withdraw and it was granted.  What is my current academic status? 

See:  Returning from Requirement to Withdraw

What is an academic plan?

See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]

Why is it important to include an academic plan in my appeal?

A strong academic plan can increase your chances for a successful appeal.  See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]

How detailed should my academic plan be?

A strong academic plan is detailed, specific and realistic.  It should address all of the key questions and contain all the essential components.  See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf] 

Is there a deadline to submit these appeals?

Yes, there is a deadline to appeal the requirement to withdraw for one year and it is indicated on the notification letter you received through SOLUS (normally 21 days from the date the letter was issued). 

What happens if I miss this deadline?

If you had extenuating circumstances that caused you to miss the appeal deadline, you may submit an appeal requesting to waive the 21-day appeal deadline so your appeal may be heard late.  If the appeal is granted, your appeal requesting to waive the requirement to withdraw will be heard but your negative service indicator will not be removed.  Therefore, you will need to receive a positive decision on your appeal before you will be permitted to register in courses.

I’m still waiting to receive my appeal decision but the Course Selection Period is starting soon.  What should I do?

If you submitted your appeal by the deadline indicated on your requirement to withdraw notification letter, then we will remove the negative service indicator from your SOLUS account so you can register in courses during the regular Course Selection Period, pending the decision on your appeal.

I haven’t received a decision on my appeal yet.  Should I register in courses for next year or not?

Yes, you may go ahead and register in courses pending the decision on your appeal.

What if my appeal is denied and I’m registered in courses?  Do I have to drop them?

If your appeal is denied, we will not remove you from your courses until you have  exhausted all of your appeal options.  You have the option to appeal the Associate Deans’ decision to the Board of Studies.  If you pursue this option, you will be permitted to continue participating in your courses pending the outcome of that appeal.

Can I appeal to waive a requirement to withdraw and drop courses past the academic deadline in the same appeal?

Yes. If the appeal is granted and the courses are dropped, it could result in the Requirement to Withdraw ruling being removed altogether if it no longer applies.

I have submitted my appeal requesting to waive the requirement to withdraw but I haven't received a decision yet. Should I register for courses in July/August or not?

Provided that you submitted your appeal within the deadline indicated on your notification letter, you will be permitted to register in courses for the following year, pending the decision on your appeal.

Can I appeal to take one year off instead of three?

If you submit your appeal requesting to waive the requirement to withdraw for a minimum of three years within the appeal deadline then you may include this as part of your academic plan.  If your appeal is granted, the requirement to withdraw ruling will be waived and you will be permitted to return to studies at any time but you may certainly take a voluntary leave of absence for a year (or longer).

I was required to withdraw for a minimum of three years and one year has lapsed but I feel ready to return to studies now.  Can I appeal to come back early?

No.  If you have not appealed within the 21-day deadline to waive the requirement to withdraw when it was imposed, you will not be permitted to appeal to return to studies until the full three years has lapsed.   


APPEAL TO RETURN TO STUDIES AFTER THE REQUIREMENT TO WITHDRAW HAS LAPSED (see
Appeal Regulations)

What information should I include in my appeal letter?

Appeals requesting to Return to Studies After a Requirement to Withdraw for Three Years has Lapsed do not necessarily need to include an explanation of extenuating circumstances but should explain what activities or steps you have undertaken during your time away from Queen's to help prepare you for future academic success and resolve any issues that affected your academic progress in the past.  You will also need to include an academic plan.

What is an academic plan?

See: Preparing an Academic Plan

What should I do after my appeal has been granted?

You should schedule an appointment to speak with an academic counsellor for information on the current academic regulations, your current academic standing, your Degree Plan requirements as well as go over how and when to register in courses and find out what academic services are available to help you improve your academic performance.


What Do I Need to Include with my Appeal?

When you submit your appeal on-line the application will indicate what you are required to submit through each step of the process.  All appeals will require an appeal letter.

Appeal Letter

How long does my appeal letter have to be?

Not long – one page is usually sufficient.  Your letter must state what exactly you are requesting.  It must also clearly explain the timeline of your extenuating circumstances, the severity of your extenuating circumstances and the impact that your extenuating circumstances have had on the courses you are appealing.  If you are registered in several courses over a term but you are only appealing one of those courses, you should include an explanation as to why only the course being appealed has been affected by your circumstances and not the other courses.  You are not required to outline the specific details of the particular condition or matter affecting you.   Also see: Tips for writing a Letter of Appeal [pdf]

Do I have to disclose the details of my extenuating circumstances?

No.  You are not required to outline the specific details of the particular condition or matter affecting you but you do need to provide enough information for the Associate Dean (Studies) to make an informed decision.  This means, we do ask that you indicate the specific ways in which your extenuating circumstances have affected your studies and provide a clear timeline indicating the start, duration and present state of your extenuating circumstances.  It is also important to explain whether or not the circumstances have either improved, been resolved or how you are managing them so that they will not have a significant and detrimental effect on your future academic performance.  Also see: Tips for writing a Letter of Appeal [pdf]

What if I am not comfortable writing down my circumstances?  Can I just come in and talk to someone?

No.  We do require all appeals to follow the standard appeals process.  You can be assured however, that you are not required to outline the specific details of the particular condition or matter affecting you.  You simply need to provide enough information for the Associate Dean (Studies) to make an informed decision.  This means, we do ask that you indicate the specific ways in which your extenuating circumstances have affected your studies and provide a clear timeline indicating the start, duration and present state of your extenuating circumstances.  It is also important to explain whether or not the circumstances have either improved, been resolved or how you are managing them so that they will not have a significant and detrimental effect on your future academic performance.  Your documentation only needs to confirm this information as well.

Can I submit more information or documentation for my appeal after it has been submitted?

Yes.  You can add more information and/or documentation to an existing appeal by accessing the appeals application on-line and clicking “Submit amendment to previous appeal”.  You will choose the appeal in progress and follow the instructions.

Do you have some tips on how to write a good appeal letter?

Also see: Tips for writing a Letter of Appeal [pdf]


Documentation

Do all appeals require supporting documentation?

Most appeals require supporting documentation to confirm the extenuating circumstances presented in your appeal letter.  See the Appeal Documentation Chart for details. Official documentation does not need to outline the specifics of the particular condition or matter affecting the student, but should indicate ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student's individual performance. Information on the start date, duration and present state of the circumstance aids the instructor, the Associate Dean (Studies) or the Board of Studies in making an informed decision concerning any matter under review. Further, comment on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed to the point that they will not have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance is also useful to appeal decision makers.

Otherwise, you may consult with an academic counsellor for advice on how to proceed with your appeal request.

What kind of documentation do I need to provide?

A note or letter from a healthcare professional is always preferred but if you have not sought professional help you may supply a letter from another individual such as a parent or family member.  Please ensure that the author of the note signs it and supplies contact information so we can have it verified.  Some other types of documentation you may submit: letters from funeral homes, death certificates, obituary notices, letters from lawyers, legal documents, court notices, bank statements, travel tickets, letter from employer, government documentation.  Documentation that is generally not considered to be adequate: photographs of medical conditions, medical reports, prescriptions, high school transcripts, resumes, notes or letters from non-certified healthcare providers.  See: http://www.queensu.ca/hcds/ds/students/documentation.html     

Official documentation does not need to outline the specifics of the particular condition or matter affecting the student, but should indicate ways in which the extenuating circumstances directly affected the student's individual performance. Information on the start date, duration and present state of the circumstance aids the instructor, the Associate Dean (Studies) or the Board of Studies in making an informed decision concerning any matter under review. Further, comment on whether the condition or circumstances have either improved or are being managed to the point that they will not have a significant detrimental effect on future academic performance is also useful to appeal decision makers.

Students are advised to submit an Off-campus Physician's Note [PDF] if requesting support from a medical professional outside of Health, Counselling and Disability Services.

I haven’t seen a doctor or counsellor so I don’t have any supporting documentation.  What should I do?

A note or letter from a healthcare professional is always preferred but if you have not sought professional help you may supply a letter from another individual such as a parent or family member.  Please ensure that the author of the note signs it and supplies contact information so we can have it verified.   For more information on what we will accept for supporting documentation see: (link).  Otherwise, you may consult with an academic counsellor for advice on how to proceed with your appeal request.

Can my parents write a letter for my documentation?

A note or letter from a healthcare professional is always preferred but if you have not sought professional help you may supply a letter from another individual such as a parent or family member. Please ensure that the author of the note signs it and supplies contact information so we can have it verified.

Can I submit my appeal now and supply my documentation later when I can get in to see my doctor, counsellor, etc?

Yes, you may submit an appeal now and have the documentation follow later.

Academic Plan

An academic plan is required for appeals requesting to add courses late (to explain how you intend on catch up on the missing course material), appeals requesting to waive requirements to withdraw and return to studies after a requirement to withdraw has lapsed.

What is an academic plan?

See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]

Why is it important to include an academic plan in my appeal?

A strong academic plan can increase your chances for a successful appeal.  See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]

How detailed should my academic plan be?

A strong academic plan is detailed, specific and realistic.  It should address all of the key questions and contain all the essential components.  See: Preparing an Academic Plan [pdf]   

Appeal Fee

There is a $50 fee to submit an appeal.  The payment must be submitted on-line as the final step of the on-line submission.  Your appeal will not be accepted and processed until the payment transaction is made.

How do I know if the transaction was successful and my appeal was submitted ok?

If your appeal was submitted properly and the payment transaction was successful, you will receive two emails immediately to your Queens’ email account. One email will contain a confirmation that your appeal was received and it will contain an appeal number so you can track the status of your appeal through the on-line system. The other email you will receive is a receipt of payment for the appeal fee.

If my appeal is denied will I get my $50.00 appeal fee back?

No.  The appeal fee is non-refundable.

Do I have to pay a separate appeal fee for each course I am appealing?

No.  There is one flat fee of $50.00 to submit an appeal and there is no limit on the number of requests you can make in one appeal.

Do I have to pay another appeal fee to appeal to the Board of Studies?

No.  There is no additional fee to appeal to the Board of Studies.

Do I have to pay a separate appeal fee for each course I am appealing?

No.  There is one flat fee of $50.00 to submit an appeal and there is no limit on the number of requests you can make in one appeal.

Can I ask to waive the $50.00 appeal fee?

Generally, no.  The only grounds under which the appeal fee would be waived is if the student can show that the appeal arose due to an administrative error on the part of the University.  If you are not able to afford the appeal fee, you may seek financial assistance through Student Awards (Gordon Hall).

How can I pay the appeal fee?

When you are finished entering your appeal information on-line you will be asked to enter your payment information.  Payment can be made by debit card, VISA or Mastercard.

Can I pay my appeal fee by cheque?

No, unfortunately we cannot accept cheques.

Can you charge the appeal fee to my student account?

No, unfortunately we cannot draw funds from your student account.

Can I submit my appeal now and pay the fee later?

No.  Payment must be received before your appeal can be accepted.

Can I ask for a refund of my tuition fees?

The Associate Dean (Studies) cannot hear appeals concerning financial requests.  These requests may be made through the Office of the University Registrar via the following form: http://www.queensu.ca/registrar/aboutus/forms/Tuition_Fee_Amendment_Appeal_Form.pdf

Any questions about this process may be directed to their office at 613-533-2040.

Other Appeal Requirements

Some appeals require support or feedback or information from instructors and/or Undergraduate Chairs.  See the Appeal Documentation Chart for information. 

If there is anything missing in my appeal will you let me know?

Yes, if there is any information, documentation or other element of your appeal missing we will place your appeal on hold and notify you by email.

Appeal Submission, Status and Decisions

APPEAL STATUS AND DECISIONS

How do I know my appeal was submitted ok?

Once you have clicked on Submit, you will receive an email confirmation that your appeal was received.  You will also be issued an application number and you can track the status of your appeal in the on-line appeals system using this number.

How will I be notified of the appeal decision?

All decisions are sent via email to the address provided in the appeal application.  Please ensure your e-mail address is correct and your inbox is not full.

How long will it take to receive a decision on my appeal?

Once your appeal has been submitted and all of the supporting documentation has been received it can take up to 21 days to receive a decision.  Note that re-read requests may take longer than 21-days (typically 6 weeks) as it takes time to find and appoint a reader and review the work in question. 

How will I receive my decision letter or notification?

All decisions are sent via email to your Queen’s email address.  Please ensure your e-mail address is valid and your inbox is not full.

How can I check the status of my appeal?

Once you have clicked on Submit, you will receive an email confirmation that your appeal was received.  You will also be issued an application number and you can track the status of your appeal in the on-line appeals system using this number.

What can I do to have my appeal heard faster?

We understand that submitting an appeal is a stressful task and they are very often time-sensitive in nature so we make every effort to review appeals and send decisions as quickly and efficiently as possible.  Having a clear and detailed appeal letter and supplying all of the supporting documentation upon submission can help to speed up the process if there is no further follow up required.   

I haven’t received a decision yet and it’s been longer than 21 days.  What should I do?

You can check the status of your appeal through the on-line application. Your decision will be sent to your e-mail address provided so please ensure that you check your e-mail including your junk folder. If there is still no decision, you may follow up by calling 613-533-2470 or emailing asc.appeals@queensu.ca.  

My appeal has been granted.  How long will it take to see the changes on my transcript?

When your appeal is granted, the transcript changes are sent to the Office of the University Registrar for processing.  This can take normally anywhere from 3 days to one week.  If you need to order a transcript or if a week has passed and the changes haven’t been made yet, please notify the Faculty Office and we will arrange to have the changes made as soon as possible. 

What happens if my appeal is denied?

If your appeal is denied no changes will be made to your transcript. You will receive information in your decision letter explaining that you have the option to appeal the Associate Dean’s decision to the Board of Studies. An appeal to the Board of Studies must be submitted within 21 days of receiving your appeal decision letter. For more information, see Second Level of Appeal: Board of Studies.

What is the difference between an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) and an appeal to the Board of Studies?

The first stage of the appeal process is an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies).  If that appeal is denied and you wish to appeal the decision, the next step is to appeal to the Board of Studies.

If my appeal is denied will I get my $50.00 appeal fee back?

No.  The appeal fee is non-refundable.

Appeal Deadline and Appeals Requesting to Waive the Deadline

Is there a deadline to submit an appeal?

Yes.  Appeals must be received within 21 days after a final grade has been posted or an academic decision or ruling has been made. 

How do I ask to have an appeal heard past the deadline?

Exceptions to this deadline can only be granted in cases where there are extenuating circumstances that prevented a student from appealing within the deadline. The student must show that the circumstances were ongoing and prevented him or her from taking any action from the time of the appeal deadline to the time at which the appeal was eventually initiated. This request must be made via an appeal requesting to waive the 21-day deadline. 
*Note that students are not able to revisit the same time period in submitting subsequent appeals.  For example, if a student has appealed to drop one or more courses without academic penalty in the Fall term, he or she cannot make a subsequent different appeal in relation to that same time period.

Are there any exceptions to the 21-day appeal deadline?

Exceptions to this deadline can only be granted in cases where there are extenuating circumstances that prevented a student from appealing within the deadline. The student must show that the circumstances were ongoing and prevented him or her from taking any action from the time of the appeal deadline to the time at which the appeal was eventually initiated.  This request must be made via an appeal requesting to waive the 21-day deadline.
*Note that students are not able to revisit the same time period in submitting subsequent appeals.  For example, if a student has appealed to drop one or more courses without academic penalty in the Fall term, he or she cannot make a subsequent different appeal in relation to that same time period.

Can I appeal a course I took a long time ago?

Generally, no.  Appeals must be received within 21 days after a final grade has been posted or an academic ruling has been made.  However, exceptions to this deadline can be granted in cases where there are extenuating circumstances that prevented a student from appealing within the deadline.  The student must show that the circumstances were ongoing and prevented him or her from taking any action from the time of the appeal deadline to the time at which the appeal was eventually initiated.  This request must be made via an appeal requesting to waive the 21-day deadline.  If the Associate Dean (Studies) grants the student’s request to hear the appeal late, the student will then be permitted to submit their appeal concerning the course he or she took longer than 21 days ago.  *Note that students are not able to revisit the same time period in submitting subsequent appeals.  For example, if a student has appealed to drop one or more courses without academic penalty in the Fall term, he or she cannot make a subsequent different appeal in relation to that same time period.

What should I write in my letter if I am appealing to waive the 21-day deadline?

In your appeal letter you must explain what the extenuating circumstances were that prevented you from appealing within the time the regular appeal deadline lapsed up to the current time.  You must also demonstrate that the circumstances were ongoing and prevented you from acting from then (when the course finished for example) until now (the time at which the appeal is being initiated. In other words, your letter must explain what prevented you from appealing from the time the course finished or the academic ruling was made until the present day.

What if my circumstances that prevented me from appealing until now and the circumstances that caused me to fail those courses were the same?

Sometimes the student’s extenuating circumstances that led to the failure in courses are ongoing and are also the reason for the delay in appealing.  That’s ok – you would simply explain the reasons for the delay in appealing the 21-day deadline and if that appeal is granted, you would explain those same extenuating circumstances in the appeal requesting the late course drops.  Sometimes the two appeal letters will be quite similar, especially if the same circumstances led to both appeals.

Can I submit the same documentation for both appeals?

Yes, if both appeals are based on the same extenuating circumstances, it may be appropriate to use the same documentation for both appeals.  Note however, that the 21-day deadline appeal must confirm the full time line of the extenuating circumstances (from the time the course finished to the time the appeal was initiated).  The documentation for a late course drop appeal only needs to confirm the extenuating circumstances that took place during the time that course was taken.

Can I submit my appeal requesting to waive the deadline and the late appeal at the same time?

No, do not submit them at the same time. You must submit the appeal requesting to waive the deadline first.  If that appeal is granted, you will then be permitted to submit your late appeal.

My appeal requesting to waive the appeal deadline was granted.  Now what?

Once your appeal requesting to waive the 21-day deadline has been granted, you may submit your late appeal.  When you go back into the on-line appeal system you will notice that you now have a third option called “Submit a Late Appeal”.  Choose this option and proceed with submitting your late appeal.  The system will skip over the payment step this time as no additional appeal is required.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Level: Appeal to the Board of Studies

What is the Board of Studies?

The Board of Studies is the second level of appeal where students may appeal a decision made by the Associate Dean (Studies). See the Appeals Regulations in the Academic Calendar for more information.

  • Appeals must be in writing accompanied by a signed Board of Studies appeal form
  • Appeals must be received in the Faculty Office by the stated deadlines (within 21 calendar days after the decision of the Associate Dean (Studies) is rendered)
  • All materials in the previous appeal are forwarded to the Board for review
  • Students may only add an additional letter to the Board addressing the decision of the Office of Associate Dean (Studies).

What are the Terms of Reference for the Board of Studies?
Read the terms of reference here [pdf].

What is the difference between an appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) and an appeal to the Board of Studies?
The first stage of the appeal process is an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies).  If that appeal is denied and you wish to appeal the decision, the next step is to appeal to the Board of Studies. If your appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) is denied, no changes will be made to your transcript. You will receive information in your decision letter explaining that you have the option to appeal the Associate Dean’s decision to the Board of Studies.  An appeal to the Board of Studies must be submitted within 21 days of receiving your appeal decision letter.

Do I have to pay another appeal fee to appeal to the Board of Studies?
No. There is no additional fee to appeal to the Board of Studies.

How much time do I have to appeal to the Board of Studies?
You have 21 days from the time your decision letter is sent to submit your appeal to the Board of Studies.

How do I submit an appeal to the Board of Studies?
See Board of Studies Appeal Form

What if I have new documentation to include that wasn’t part of my original appeal?

Any new documentation you submit will be first reviewed by the Associate Dean (Studies). This will allow him or her an opportunity to review your appeal again with the new documentation taken into consideration.  The Associate Dean (Studies) may choose to allow the appeal to proceed to the Board of Studies with the new documentation now included or change his or her decision and grant the appeal based on the new documentation.

How does this appeal work?

Your appeal to the Board of Studies will be submitted to the Arts and Science Faculty Office and it will be received by the Secretary to the Board of Studies.  The Secretary will review the appeal to ensure it is complete and contact you to arrange a meeting time and provide you with further instruction.  You will have an opportunity to review your appeal and related materials before it is forwarded to the Board members.  Your appeal will be heard by a Board during a meeting of its members.  The Board members are all provided with a copy of your appeal and they will review it in advance of the meeting.  You have the option of attending this meeting and having an opportunity to present your appeal and answer questions from Board members.  You may also have a Dispute Resolution Advisor or other support person or representative attend the meeting with you.  Otherwise, you may choose to not attend this meeting and it will proceed in your absence.        

Who is on the Board?
The Board membership consists of

  • three students
  • nine faculty members from a cross-section of Arts and Science departments

All Board hearings shall be heard by four members, one of whom in normally a student. Members who are close to the case, or for other reasons need to declare a conflict of interest, will not be in attendance.

  • a secretary to the Board and
  • an informational officer from the Arts and Science Student Services Office.

The Associate Dean (Studies) is not a member of the Board but will attend when a student chooses to appear before the Board. The Associate Dean (Studies) is there to clarify specific aspects of his or her decision and to speak to the larger context of the decision within the Faculty of Arts and Science policies, regulations and practices.

What do I need to know before my meeting with the Board?

  • You are permitted, in fact encouraged, to have representation at the hearing. You may wish to bring a trusted friend, family member, student advocate, a Dispute Resolution Advisor or even legal representation.
  • The Board will have received and read your written appeal in advance of the meeting.
  • During the meeting, anyone can call for a break in the proceedings. If you feel you would like a break to compose your thoughts, you may request one from the Chair at any time.

What will happen at my meeting with the Board?

  1. Prior to inviting you into the meeting, the Board will take a few minutes to review any jurisdictional matters and to identify anything in the documentation that requires clarification.
  2. After you are called into the meeting, the Chair will ask members to introduce themselves.
  3. After introductions, you will be invited to make a presentation clarifying any aspect of the information you have presented to the Board in written form. Since the Board will have read the written submission and already be familiar with facts presented by you, your professor(s) (if applicable) and the decision of the Associate Dean (Studies), it is not necessary to re-state your claims. Any introductory comments you might make should take no longer than 5 or 10 minutes.
  4. After your presentation, the Chair will ask the Associate Dean (Studies) if he or she wishes to make any statements concerning his or her decision, past precedents or the academic regulations related to the case.
  5. At this point in the proceedings, the Board may ask questions clarifying what you have said or written. These questions are intended to offer you a full and fair opportunity to state your case. It is important therefore to answer the questions directly and completely.
  6. After questions from the Board, all parties will be given a chance to make any final or summary comments. If you wish to do so, it is an opportunity for you to summarize the main points of your case.
  7. Following presentations and questions, all participants will leave to allow the Board to discuss the case and come to a decision. The decision of the Board will be to uphold the Associate Dean (Studies) decision, modify the decision or grant the student's appeal.

What happens after the meeting?

  1. Immediately following the meeting, the Secretary to the Board will email you with a brief notice of the Board's decision.
  2. The Chair of the Board will compose a letter outlining the decision, the reasons for the decision and the possibilities for an appeal (if the decision is not in your favour). This letter will be sent to you by mail.
  3. Decisions of the Board may be appealed on procedural grounds by either party to the University Student Appeals Board by filing a written notice of intention to appeal with the Secretary of Senate within two (2) weeks of receipt of the Board's decision.

Note: Any change in academic registration may impact government student financial assistance eligibility and/or funding. Please consult with the Student Awards Office, Office of the University Registrar, Gordon Hall, to understand the potential implications of changes to course or program registration and/or the consequences of not successfully completing the required course load.

What happens if the Board overturns the Associate Dean (Studies) decision?

If your appeal is granted, the Faculty Office will be notified and the appropriate changes will be made to your transcript or action will be taken to fulfill your appeal request.

What happens if the Board uphold the Associate Dean (Studies) decision?

If your appeal is denied, no changes will be made to your transcript and you will have the option to appeal the decision of the Board of Studies to USAB (within 21 days of receiving your appeal decision).  Note: appeals to USAB have specific terms of reference.  You should consult with the Office of the University Ombudsperson (room 237 Robert Sutherland Hall, ombuds@queensu.ca, 533-6495) for advice on how to proceed with this appeal.  

 

Third Level: Appeal to the University Student Appeal Board

The third, and final level of appeal is to the University Student Appeal Board:

  • Appeals to the University Student Appeal Board relate only to the process by which the previous decisions were rendered and does not deal with the merits of the appeal itself.
  • Contact Harry Smith in the Office of the Ombudsperson (phone: (613) 533-6495; email: ombuds@queensu.ca).

For general information please refer to the Queen’s University Senate Policy on Student Appeals, Rights and Discipline: http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/policies/senateandtrustees/SARDPolicy.pdf

Submit an Online Appeal

Have Questions?

Call us at 613-533-2470 or email us.

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