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March in solidarity

Queen's community shows support for those affected by racist and homophobic incident.

  • Students, faculty, and staff gather in solidarity with Queen's Indigenous and LGBTQ2+ communities.
    Students, faculty, and staff gather in solidarity with Queen's Indigenous and LGBTQ2+ communities. (University Communications)
  • Kassie Hill and Emma Sparks, Co-Presidents of the Queen's Native Student Association, speak at the rally.
    Kassie Hill and Emma Sparks, co-presidents of the Queen's Native Student Association, speak at the rally. (University Communications)
  • Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs expresses the university's support and commitment to those affected.
    Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, expresses the university's support and commitment to those affected. (University Communications)
  • Queen's students, faculty, and staff gathered in front of the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre to hear speakers in advance of the march.
    Queen's students, faculty, and staff gathered in front of the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre to hear speakers in advance of the march. (University Communications)
  • Jane Mao, Chown Hall Residence Don and part of the Education on Queer Issues Project (EQuIP), speaks to supporters before the march.
    Jane Mao, Chown Hall Residence don and part of the Education on Queer Issues Project (EQuIP), speaks to supporters before the march. (University Communications)
  • The Pride and Métis flags flying at the centre of campus.
    The Pride and Métis flags flying at the centre of campus. (University Communications)
  • Marchers moving down Union Street to the heart of campus.
    Marchers moving down Union Street to the heart of campus. (University Communications)
  • The Haudenosaunee flag flying from Principal Patrick Deane's office at Richardson Hall.
    The Haudenosaunee flag flying from Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane's office at Richardson Hall. (University Communications)
  • Queen's Student Wellness Services staff wave to marchers and display signs of support.
    Queen's Student Wellness Services staff wave to marchers and display signs of support. (University Communications)
  • The Anishinaabe flag flying from Provost Tom Harris' office at Richardson Hall.
    The Anishinaabe flag flying from Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris' office at Richardson Hall. (University Communications)

Queen’s community members turned out in the hundreds to stand up for those threatened by a racist and homophobic poster, recently discovered in a student residence building. Students, faculty, and staff marched in solidarity through the heart of campus from the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre to Chown Hall and back, condemning the act of discrimination.

The march began with speeches from student representatives, Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre staff, and senior Queen’s administrators.

“Today, I stand here proud to be who I am,” says Kassie Hill, Co-President of the Queen’s Native Student Association. “I’m proud to be a representative of Indigenous students on campus, and I can say that whoever did this failed to diminish my flame because I am more passionate and more ignited to make change than ever.”

Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation), Kandice Baptiste, Director of Four Directions, and Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, were among those who also spoke to the crowd.

"It was uplifting to see so many members of the Queen’s community attend the students’ march, and stand up to the vile, hateful, racist, violent and homophobic sentiments expressed in the poster placed in Queen’s residence," says Hill. "As terrible as this incident was, it has provided us with an opportunity to make a bold statement and commitment and to act to create real change not only on this campus, but in this country and beyond. It is time to question systems and barriers, and it is time to acknowledge and validate our ways of knowing and being in the world. I look forward to working with our students, my fellow Indigenous colleagues, and all members of the Queen’s community to take action towards lasting change."