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Operating at a higher level

Contributions to computer-assisted surgery earns Randy Ellis a fellowship with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Queen’s University computing professor Randy Ellis has been named a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The honour recognizes Dr. Ellis’ exceptional engineering achievements and contributions to the engineering profession.

Dr. Randy Ellis (Computing) is one of only seven Canadians to hold a fellowship in both the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

“I am very pleased and honoured to be named a fellow of the ASME,” Dr. Ellis says. “Even though this is an individual honour, I see it as recognition of my research group’s collective efforts over the past 25 years.”

Dr. Ellis, who holds the Queen’s Research Chair in Computer-Assisted Surgery, was nominated for his ongoing work in the field. Over the past 25 years, Dr. Ellis and his research partners have produced more than 300 scientific contributions detailing technical improvements to the technology integrating 3D imaging, surgical planning and intraoperative navigation.

These developments were translated into clinical practice in one of the world’s first computer-assisted surgical suites, which was designed and commissioned by Dr. Ellis at Kingston General Hospital. These breakthroughs can be traced back to a “chance conversation” in the lounge of the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.

 “I was talking with one of my PhD students about how to find faults in robotic joints. We were overheard by someone from the bioengineering side who asked if we could apply that math to human joints, and the research took off from there,” he says.

This is the second notable fellowship Dr. Ellis has received this year. He was previously named a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), making him one of only seven Canadians to hold both distinctions.

Founded in 1880 by a small group of leading industrialists, ASME has grown to include more than 140,000 members in 151 countries.  It serves to promote the art, science and practice of multidisciplinary engineering around the globe. To learn more about ASME, please visit www.asme.org.