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An opportunity to serve

Queen’s Law Professor Grégoire Webber takes on new role advising Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada.

Queen’s University Professor Grégoire Webber has traded his office in Macdonald Hall for one on Parliament Hill.

Dr. Webber has been appointed as the Legal Affairs Advisor to the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. Dr. Webber will take a leave of absence to join the minister’s office, effective Aug. 1.

Queen's University law professor Grégoire Webber has accepted a position as Legal Affairs Advisor to the Minister of Justice.

“It is a special privilege to have been offered this opportunity,” says Dr. Webber. “I hope to be able to make a contribution.”

In his new role, Dr. Webber will offer his perspective and insight to assist the work of the minister on a wide range of issues – each of which will have a long-lasting impact on Canadian society. Dr. Webber will advise Minister Wilson-Raybould – Canada’s third female and first Indigenous Minister of Justice – as she carries out her duties to provide legal advice to cabinet and ensure government bills adhere to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Less than one year into the government’s mandate, the ministry has been tasked with passing assisted dying legislation, reforming Canada’s criminal justice system and legalizing marijuana. Many complex issues with broad-reaching legal implications remain, including a review of how Indigenous Canadians are impacted by the justice system and the inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls.

Dr. Webber's new position dovetails well with his current work as Canada Research Chair in Public Law and Philosophy of Law, while harkening back to his pre-academic career as a senior policy advisor with the Privy Council Office.

“Grégoire will be sorely missed during his absence, but we’re pleased to be able to provide him leave for this opportunity,” says Queen’s Law Dean Bill Flanagan. “During his tenure at the law school to date, he has provided a wealth of energy and ideas, including the co-founding of our new cross-disciplinary program in legal philosophy. His selection for this role with the minister is an acknowledgement of the quality of our faculty at Queen’s Law, and his experiences there will ultimately benefit the school upon his return.”