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Promoting undergraduate research

  • The 2019 USSRF recipients gather with Principal Patrick Deane and Vice-Principal (Research) Kim Woodhouse during the 2019 Celebration.
    The 2019 USSRF recipients gather with Principal Patrick Deane and Vice-Principal (Research) Kim Woodhouse during the 2019 Celebration.
  • USSRF recipient Claire Simon takes a moment in front of her poster presentation with her faculty supervisor Dr. Lisa Pasolli.
    USSRF recipient Claire Simon takes a moment in front of her poster presentation with her faculty supervisor Dr. Lisa Pasolli.
  • Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane hands out certificates of achievement to the 2019 USSRF recipients.
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane hands out certificates of achievement to the 2019 USSRF recipients.
  • Samantha Simpson, one of the 2019 USSRF recipients, explains her research poster at Stauffer Library.
    Samantha Simpson, one of the 2019 USSRF recipients, explains her research poster at Stauffer Library.
  • USSRF recipients present their projects to attendees during the 2019 Celebration at Stauffer Library
    USSRF recipients present their projects to attendees during the 2019 Celebration at Stauffer Library
  • Owen Saunders shares his experience with the USSRF program
    Owen Saunders shares his experience with the USSRF program.

Summer is not always synonymous with studies, but for the recipients of the 2019 Undergraduate Student Summer Research Fellowships (USSRF), this past summer was an opportunity to gain a valuable experience in discovery-based learning and to develop their research skills.

Research at Queen's
Did you know that the university recently launched a new central website for Queen’s research? From in-depth features, the latest news, and featured researchers, the site is a destination showcasing the impact of Queen’s research. Discover Research at Queen’s.

Through this program sponsored by the Vice-Principal (Research) portfolio, students, under the guidance of faculty researchers, have the unique opportunity to develop their own research projects in the social sciences, humanities, or creative arts. This past year, 19 fellowships of $6,000 were available to continuing students interested in the 16-week summer program. Two additional fellowships of $5,000 plus travel and room and board were available to students whose projects took place at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) in East Sussex, England.

“Research can be a rewarding part of the undergraduate experience,” says Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “The USSRF program provides students with critical research, analytical, and presentation skills that will help prepare them for future studies or careers.” 

Recently, as part of the annual USSRF celebration, the 21 recipients had a chance to display project posters and speak to their projects. At the event, hosted by Principal Patrick Deane and Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research), attendees heard from two recipients about their own experiences with the program. 

Clare Simon is a history student under the supervision of Queen’s researcher Dr. Lisa Pasolli. Simon’s project, “Not just somebody’s mother: university Campus Daycare Co-operatives in British Columbia and Ontario, 1960s to 1970s,” analyzed case studies from Simon Fraser University, University of Toronto, and Queen’s. Her research led her to explore the history of university daycares and situated their development within the context of contemporary ideologies.

“Being able to create and develop my own project as an undergraduate student is an exciting and unique experience,” says Simon. “The USSRF program has given me valuable skills which I will continue to apply in my undergraduate degree and, hopefully, graduate degrees as well.”

Owen Saunders is a political studies student who worked with Queen’s researcher Dr. Christian Leuprecht. Saunders’s project, “Cyber Electoral Interference in the Five Eyes Countries,” examined Canadian responses to cybersecurity threats in comparison to the US, the UK, Australia, and New Zealand. His project also gave him the opportunity to conclude with policy recommendations based on this research.

“The USSRF application and research experience provides a fantastic opportunity to work one on one with a professor in your department, enhancing your research and writing skills,” says Saunders.

Since 2011, more than 200 students have taken part in the USSRF program. The application deadline for the 2020 program is March 2 at 9 am.

Research posters from this year’s USSRF recipients will be on display in Stauffer Library from Oct. 28 to Nov. 8. For more information, visit the USSRF program website